Google's at it again with a new Olympics-themed doodles game.

Today's installment of the logo-turned mini-game features a canoe racing down a river laden with obstacles. Players must navigate the boat between rocks by pushing the right and left arrow keys. The quicker you alternate keys, the faster your boat will move. But here's the really difficult part: Olympian wannabes must try and weave between several "gates" to avoid penalties. In other words, you won't rack up winning points with just your speed in this tricky little doodle.

The Canoe Slalom competition has already taken place in the 2012 London Olympic games; it ran from July 29 to August 2. The races included both a men and women's kayak race, as well as a men and women's double canoe. France took home two gold metals in this category, with Great Britain and Italy each grabbing one gold.

Canoeing was first played as an Olympic sport on flat water in the 1936 Berlin Games. The slalom, raced on white-water rapids, wasn't contested in the Olympics until 1972, and was permanently added to the Olympic program in 1992. To power this particular course in Hertfordshire, England, about 13,000 liters of water rushed through the raging river every second, according to the London Olympics website.

Today's canoe race is Google's 13th official London Games doodle, per the company's website. Earlier this week Google produced its first Olympics mini-game, giving users the chance to race the 110 meter, while yesterday provided bored 9-to-5-ers the opportunity to shoot hoops like a basketball all-star.

Let's hope we get a couple more addictive game before the Olympics Closing Ceremony, scheduled for this Sunday, August 12.

What was your Slalom racing score? Can you beat our subpar 29 points? Leave your canoe stats below in the comments section or tweet them to us at [@HuffPostTech].

CORRECTION: The original version of this post misstated the number of types of Olympic canoeing there are, as well as the start date of the sport in the Games based off of what was written on the 2012 Olympics website.