Sarah Klein Headshot

Fix Your Form: How To Do The Perfect Bridge On A Ball

Posted: Updated:

If you don't know your way around a weight room, heading to the gym can be intimidating -- and even dangerous. But paying attention to a few simple rules of proper technique can make you slimmer, stronger and healthier all over.

That's why we asked John Romaniello, trainer, author and founder of Roman Fitness Systems to show us what's what when it comes to strength training.

He'll be helping us tackle some of the most common mistakes we all make while building muscle, plus giving us tips and tricks for better form. This week, we're perfecting the glute bridge on a stability ball.

The Faux Pas: "Most people let the hips sag to the ground rather than keeping them elevated," says Romaniello, similar to how we often slack off doing a regular bridge. And that means you probably won't see the results you're hoping for. "This reduces tension and recruitment of the glutes and hamstrings, which are the muscles you're trying to target."
2012-08-20-hamstringball2.jpg

The Fix: "Keep your hips in the air by contracting your core muscles and glutes," he says. And when he says "in the air," he really means it, as you can see here.
2012-08-20-hamstringball3.jpg

Tell us how it goes in the comments below, and be sure to check back over the following weeks to fix your form on common gym machines.

Check out more in our Fix Your Form series below:

Close
Fix Your Form
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Photos by Damon Dahlen, AOL

For more on fitness and exercise, click here.

Around the Web

How to Exercise

Fitness 101: The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Exercise

How to Exercise: 6 steps - wikiHow

Exercise: How To Get Started -- FamilyDoctor.org

 
From Our Partners