Hurricane Irene and its remnants raked the Caribbean, the eastern U.S. and Canada for more than a week a year ago. Though it never hit the U.S. as anything stronger than a minimal hurricane, it killed at least 67 people in all and ranks as the costliest Category 1 storm on record since at least 1980. It caused an estimated $15.8 billion in total damage.

Below is a look at Irene's toll, region by region, in the order the storm hit, based on official statistics, private estimates and Associated Press reports. Power outage figures are per customer, which is defined as one home or business.

State-by-state damage figures are estimates; they do not add up to $15.8 billion because many states do not calculate some losses, such as uninsured property damage.

CARIBBEAN:

Deaths: 8

Damage: At least $370 million

Power outages: Millions

The Caribbean fared better than initially feared because the worst of the storm missed major population centers. But hundreds of homes were damaged on Puerto Rico, the British Virgin Islands, the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas. Lightning sparked a fire that burned a house owned by billionaire Richard Branson in the British Virgin Islands; guests inside at the time included actress Kate Winslet. No one was injured.

FLORIDA:

Deaths: 2

Damage: Negligible

Power outages: None

Irene threatened Florida's Atlantic coast but then veered north and missed the state. Still, the storm brought some rain and heavy surf. A teacher and a tourist died in rough waters off New Smyrna Beach. Waves also damaged sea turtle nests along the central coast.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Deaths: None

Damage: At least $5 million

Power outages: 8,000

Irene brushed the coast, snapping tree limbs and flooding streets in beach towns. The worst damage was to beaches, with erosion reported along the central coast.

NORTH CAROLINA

Deaths: 7

Damage: At least $1.2 billion

Power outages: 660,000

The center of Irene made its first U.S. landfall as a Category 1 hurricane near Cape Lookout on the Outer Banks, a series of barrier islands. The storm cut a breach through Hatteras Island, resulting in the construction of a temporary bridge.

VIRGINIA:

Deaths: 5

Damage: At least $182 million

Power outages: 1.1 million

While Irene struck Virginia's southeastern coast and caused minor flooding and wind damage, the storm's effects were most severe farther inland, closer to the area around the state capital, Richmond. Strong winds knocked down trees and caused the second-largest power outage in state history. Thousands of homes were damaged. More than 200 roads had to be closed.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Deaths: None

Damage: At least $15 million

Power outages: More than 38,000

Some water leaked inside the Washington Monument, which had been damaged by an earthquake less than a week earlier. Hundreds of trees fell in the nation's capital, some onto homes. "We fared much better than we could have," Mayor Vincent Gray said.

MARYLAND

Deaths: 3

Damage: At least $518.2 million

Power outages: 750,000

Irene forced the evacuation of Ocean City, but the coastal resort town avoided serious damage. A nuclear reactor was knocked offline by an automatic shutdown when siding blew into a transformer. Trees smashed into roofs of homes in the town of Hollywood. Long delays in restoring power helped lead Gov. Martin O'Malley to order a study to find ways to improve electricity distribution.

DELAWARE

Deaths: 2

Damage: $43.2 million

Power outages: At least 119,000

A tornado damaged several homes in southern Delaware. Beaches were slightly damaged, and an access road through a wildlife refuge was washed out.

PENNSYLVANIA

Deaths: 6

Damage: $58 million

Power outages: 1.3 million

Irene's high winds and heavy rains uprooted trees, flooded creeks and rivers and caused widespread power outages across the eastern half of Pennsylvania. Three of the six deaths blamed on the hurricane resulted from falling trees. Recovery efforts were hampered by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee, which struck the state less than two weeks later.

NEW JERSEY

Deaths: 11

Damage: $1 billion

Power outages: 2 million

Irene's center made its second U.S. landfall near Atlantic City with tropical storm-strength winds of 69 mph — 5 mph slower than needed for hurricane status. Yet it dumped as much as 10 inches of rain and caused record flooding in northern parts of the state. Many homes were damaged or destroyed, and thousands of people were displaced.

NEW YORK

Deaths: 10

Damage: More than $1.3 billion

Power outages: 1.1 million

Irene's eye made its third U.S. landfall in Brooklyn but did not materialize into the big-city disaster many had feared. The city had shut down its subway system for the first time in history and evacuated thousands of coastal residents. Only minor flooding was reported. But inland, the storm caused severe flooding that closed hundreds of roads and bridges. Tourist destinations in the Catskill and Adirondack mountains lost millions of dollars in revenue over the summer as they sought to repair damage to trees, hillsides and lakes that were drained by demolished dams.

CONNECTICUT

Deaths: 2

Damage: $235 million

Power outages: 830,000

Irene's center made its fourth and final U.S. landfall in Connecticut, hitting with 60 mph winds and drenching rains that destroyed dozens of coastal homes and flooded fields along rivers. Power outages broke a single-event record that had stood since Hurricane Gloria in 1985. The storm led lawmakers to pass legislation intended to improve utility companies' response to storms and prevent large power failures.

RHODE ISLAND

Deaths: None

Damage: $103.7 million

Power outages: 344,000

Long-term power outages were considered the worst effect. Trees blocked roads, but widespread flooding didn't materialize. A state Senate committee called for better communication among the state's emergency management agency, the utility company and local leaders.

MASSACHUSETTS

Deaths: 1

Damage: $194.5 million

Power outages: 786,000

Power lines and trees were taken down, and flooding closed many roads. Repairs to an area ravaged by a rare tornado two months before were hindered. The state's major population center, Boston, was barely afflicted.

VERMONT

Deaths: 6

Damage: $733 million

Power outages: 117,000

Irene's rains caused Vermont's most devastating natural disaster since flooding in 1927. About a dozen communities were cut off, some for days, after raging rivers tore out roads and bridges in the mountainous state. More than 500 miles of roads and dozens of bridges, including many of the state's famous covered bridges, were damaged or destroyed. Thousands of people were displaced. The damage estimate almost equals two-thirds of Vermont's annual general fund budget. Floodwaters coursed through a cemetery and ripped coffins from the ground, strewing remains for miles. A year later, road and bridge repairs are done, but some of the road projects need to be redone eventually because the work was stopgap. Some displaced residents still have not found permanent housing.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Deaths: 1

Damage: $35 million

Power outages: 175,000

Rain caused major flooding and closed hundreds of roads. Some trails in White Mountain National Forest are still closed; others are being restored.

MAINE

Deaths: 2

Damage: $22.7 million

Power outages: More than 300,000

Lobstermen moved traps, boaters sought safe harbors and Gov. Paul LePage declared a state of emergency as Irene approached. Heavy rain in western Maine washed out two bridges near a popular ski resort.

CANADA

Deaths: 1

Damage: $130 million

Power outages: More than 250,000

Irene crossed into Quebec as a post-tropical storm. Parts of southern Quebec experienced flooding, resulting in road washouts and one death when a culvert collapsed and a vehicle was swept into a river near Montreal. Heavy winds downed trees and knocked out electricity to tens of thousands in Quebec and New Brunswick. At the height of the storm 250,000 were without power in Quebec.

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  • Tom Scorsone

    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., Tom Scorsone, of the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department, works on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this file photo of Aug. 28, 2011, a man surveys the floodwaters on Manhattan's West Side after Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, hit New York. Two years before Irene created the prospect of a flooding nightmare in New York City, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: Massive, moveable barriers to shield the city from a storm-stirred sea.(AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)

  • n this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., crews from the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department work on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, people near New York's Brooklyn Bridge wade through floodwaters brought on by Hurricane Irene, which weakened to a tropical storm just before hitting New York's Coney Island. Two years prior to Irene, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: massive, moveable barriers to shield New York City from a storm-stirred sea. The network would protect Manhattan and parts of the four outer boroughs and New Jersey, but not some vulnerable swaths of Brooklyn and Queens. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

  • In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., crews from the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department work on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2011, file photo, waves crash against the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, N.J. as Hurricane Irene approached the northeast. Two years before Irene, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: Massive, moveable barriers to shield New York City from a storm-stirred sea. One strategy entailed an estimated $9.1 billion set of barriers at three critical points around the city's waterways. The network would protect Manhattan and parts of the four outer boroughs and New Jersey, but not some vulnerable swaths of Brooklyn and Queens. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, waves crash into the pier at Brooklyn's Coney Island as Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, approaches New York. Irene proved not to be the catastrophe forecasters feared in the city, but in the wake of last year's near-miss, elected officials and community groups are pressing for an evaluation of whether sea barriers make sense for New York, and the city has been gathering information, while stressing that the barriers represent only one of many ideas under study.(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, a biker makes his way around a taxi stranded in floodwaters of Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, in New York. Two years before Irene created the prospect of a flooding nightmare in New York City, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: massive, moveable barriers to shield the city from a storm-stirred sea.(AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)

  • In this March 20, 2012, file photo, silt from Tropical Storm Irene covers a farmers' field Tuesday, March 20, 2012 in Waitsfield, Vt. A year after Hurricane Irene tore through farms from North Carolina to Vermont, some farmers are still grappling with the aftermath. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, farmer's fields are flooded from Tropical Storm Irene in this aerial view on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 in Rutland, Vt. A year after Hurricane Irene tore through farms from North Carolina to Vermont, some farmers are still grappling with the aftermath. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, water covers Main St. in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene in Waterbury, Vt. Vermont has become a national leader in how to respond to natural disasters, Gov. Peter Shumlin says, and there's little he'd change about the state's handling of flooding after Irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, an excavator works in the White River in Stockbridge, Vt. Tropical Storm Irene had a major effect on Vermont,s rivers. Hurricane Irene and its remnants raked the Caribbean, the eastern U.S. and Canada for more than a week a year ago. Though it never hit the U.S. as anything stronger than a minimal hurricane, it ranks among the costliest in history, causing more than $5.3 billion in damage, and killed at least 67 people in all. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, a sign remembers Tropical storm Irene in East Granville, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by the storm. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, workers begin repair to damage by Tropical Storm Irene on U.S. Route 4 in Mendon, Vt. Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin hailed the reopening of U.S Route 4 in such a short time. Vermont has become a national leader in how to respond to natural disasters, Gov. Peter Shumlin says, and there's little he'd change about the state's handling of flooding after Irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, Nina Brennan, right, and Phyllis Berry clean mud from in front of the Proud Flower store in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene in Waterbury, Vt. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE -In this Oct. 31, 2011, file photo, a mobile home sits partially demolished by Tropical Storm Irene in Berlin, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by the storm. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, Janet Lumbra stands outside the recreational trailer where she lives in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever.

  • FILE-In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, rescue personnel bring stranded residents to shore in Montpelier, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, the destroyed home of Janet Lumbra is seen in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever.

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, destruction on Route 4 from Tropical Storm Irene is seen in Killington, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, people walk along a washed out section of Route 12 in Berlin, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, damage from Tropical Storm Irene is seen in Woodlawn Cemetery in Rochester, Vt. A year after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene washed 50 graves from their resting places, progress is slow toward repairing Woodlawn Cemetery and rebuiring dozens of sets of remains washed into the open.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, burial vaults are lined up in Woodlawn Cemetery in Rochester, Vt. A year after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene washed 50 graves from their resting places, progress is slow toward repairing Woodlawn Cemetery and rebuiring dozens of sets of remains washed into the open.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, Janet Lumbra looks over the remains of her home in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • Mike Parillo

    Mike Parillo, a volunteer at the Walter Elwood Museum , looks over items and records that were save and restored following flooding from last year's Hurricane Irene are on display on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Amsterdam, N.Y. The flooding damaged about 40 state parks and historic sites, including sand erosion at Long Island's Jones Beach, miles of toppled trees, and a destroyed water main at Bear Mountain in the Hudson Valley. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Items that were saved at the Walter Elwood Museum and restored following flooding from Hurricane Irene are on display on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Amsterdam, N.Y. The flooding damaged about 40 state parks and historic sites, including sand erosion at Long Island's Jones Beach, miles of toppled trees, and a destroyed water main at Bear Mountain in the Hudson Valley.(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Alessa Wylie

    Alessa Wylie, director of Old Fort Johnson, stands in a hallway at the museum while showing off restoration work done there after damage caused by flooding from Hurricane Irene last year, on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Fort Johnson, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • In this Aug. 28, 2011 photo, a flooded road is seen in Hatteras Island, N.C., after Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations. Irene caused more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast to reportedly lose power over the weekend, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

  • Sandy Gaffney reflects in her new trailer home on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 in Berlin, Vt. Gaffney lost the first home she ever owned when Tropical Storm Irene hit her mobile home park less than a year after she moved in. After months of struggle, bonding with and helping other flood victims, and speaking out, she's moved back in the Weston's Mobile Home Park, into a renovated trailer, and turned into an activist.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • New trailer homes are seen at Weston's Mobile Home Park on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 in Berlin, Vt. Sandy Gaffney lost the first home she ever owned when Tropical Storm Irene hit her mobile home park less than a year after she moved in. After months of struggle, bonding with and helping other flood victims, and speaking out, she's moved back in the Weston's Mobile Home Park, into a renovated trailer, and turned into an activist.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2011 file photo, crews from Connecticut Light and Power replace a damaged transformer in East Windsor, Conn., in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene. The Public Utilities Regulatory Authority said Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012, it will consider reducing the allowed profit for CL&P as a penalty for the way the utility handled power outages during storms in August and October 2011. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

  • Workers install a foundation at a house that was damaged after flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, in Prattsville, N.Y. Hurricane Irene was trumpeted as a potentially huge disaster that could wipe out New York City. It initially underwhelmed but then stalked inland and tore apart a landlocked state. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)