By MAGGIE MICHAEL, Associated Press

CAIRO -- A heavy metal concert has prompted a police investigation after an Islamist lawyer claimed it was attended by Satanists at a well-known cultural center in Egypt's capital Cairo.

A security official says Muslim Brotherhood lawyer Ismail el-Washahi filed a suit accusing the El-Sawy Culture Wheel of hosting people wearing black t-shirts, carrying Satanists' drawings and accessories while dancing at the concert. The suit claims "Satanist rituals were held."

The center denied the claims, saying some violations of its rules, like smoking, occurred but were dealt with. An investigation began Monday, said the official, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to talk to the press.

The allegations recall a high-profile case 15 years ago when state security cracked down on "Satan worshippers," arresting some 100 heavy metal fans.

Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Graffiti depicting a high ranking army officer with an eye patch and Arabic writing that reads, "your eye, the square says the truth, we will always say no," is seen at a protest encampment in front of the cabinet building in Cairo, Egypt Sunday, Dec. 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 26: Egyptian people take photos of graffiti written on the walls in Mohammed Mahmoud Street off Tahrir Square on January 26, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 26: Egyptian people walk past graffiti written on the walls in Mohammed Mahmoud Street off Tahrir Square on January 26, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian woman walks past graffiti reading 'Revolution' outside the American University, off Tahrir Square in Cairo on December 21, 2011. (FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • CAIRO, EGYPT - JANUARY 26: Egyptian people walk past graffiti written on the walls in Mohammed Mahmoud Street off Tahrir Square on January 26, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian soldier assists an elderly voter as he walks with a relative past graffiti depicting the Egyptian uprising at a polling station in Qaliubia, some 40 kms north of Cairo, during the third and final round of landmark parliamentary elections on January 3, 2012. (MOHAMMED HOSSAM/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian boy flashes the 'V' sign for victory as he stands in front of a political graffiti painted on a wall along a road leading to Cairo's Tahrir Square on December 24, 2011. (FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian couple sit by an Arabic graffiti that reads 'April 6' as the Egyptian youth movement, on a side road of Cairo's Tahrir Square on December 28, 2011. (FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian man sits close to graffiti depicting former president Hosni Mubarak hanging at the gallows, as he watches others taking part in a sit-in at Tahrir Square demanding further reforms in Cairo, on July 27, 2011, months after the resignation of Mubarak. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An Egyptian man crawls through a gap in a barrier of cement blocks that closes the road leading to the protest camp in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. The Arabic writing reads "the gap, heads up." (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • An Egyptian holds a banner in front of graffiti showing Ahmed Harara, who lost one eye in the revolt that ousted Hosni Mubarak and the other during recent protests to oust the military rulers, at an encampment in front of the cabinet building in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Dec. 9, 2011. Arabic reads "Liars." (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • An Egyptian man holding a national flag walks past Arabic graffiti which reads 'The Eyes of Freedom Street', sprayed on a wall by protesterss who want to change the name of Mohammed Mahmud street -- the scene of confrontations between Egyptian security forces and anti-military activists in central Cairo -- as tens of thousands converged on the nearby Tahrir Square on January 25, 2012 to mark the first anniversary of the country's revolt against the former regime. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • In this Monday, Jan. 23, 2012 photo, Egyptian women walk past graffiti depicting a military tank on a wall under a bridge in Cairo, Egypt. In May, Mohamed Fahmy, known in the graffiti world as Gazneer, made one of Cairo's largest and longest surviving pieces of street art under a bridge used by taxi drivers to urinate. It was an image of a military tank pointed toward a boy on a bike who, rather than carrying a traditional bread delivery, was carrying the city on his head. It was a symbolic reference to youth who care for the nation and are heading toward a collision with Egypt's military rulers. On his blog, Ganzeer wrote: "Our only hope right now is to destroy the military council using the weapon of art." (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

  • An Egyptian man passes by graffiti that reads in Arabic, "I wish to be a martyr, what do you wish for?" near a protest camp in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • In this Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012 photo, a man cleans a side walk as graffiti is shown on the wall with Arabic writing from top left to top right that reads, "the answer and the other answer, we will not forget these dates, the people will still revolt, raise the revolutionary flag, hit Tantawy, the revolution will bring justice, we are for Tahrir," in Cairo, Egypt. Taking control of the streets was critical for the thousands of Egyptians who eventually overthrew their authoritarian leader nearly one year ago, but the battle for freedom of expression continues to be fought by graffiti artists who support the country's military rulers and those who want them to relinquish power. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

  • In this Saturday, Dec. 24, 2011 photo, two boys look through concrete blocks built by Egyptian military with Arabic writing that reads, "freedom," near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. Taking control of the streets was critical for the thousands of Egyptians who eventually overthrew their authoritarian leader nearly one year ago, but the battle for freedom of expression continues to be fought by graffiti artists who support the country's military rulers and those who want them to relinquish power. (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

  • Two women walk by a mural depicting faces of some Egyptians killed before and after the revolution, Arabic reads "No conciliation", at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2011. SCAF in the graffiti refers to the ruling Supreme Council of the Army Forces. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egyptian protesters sit in front of graffiti showing protesters chat slogans and the on the right side the face of Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, the head of Egypt's ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), with arabic writing, center, that reads "if you see the fangs of the lion bared, then don't think the lion is smiling," at a rally to mark the first anniversary of the "Friday of Rage," in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Jan. 27, 2012. Some 10,000 Egyptian protesters converged on Cairo's downtown Tahrir Square to mark the first anniversary of "Friday of Rage," a key day in the popular uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

  • Egyptian army soldiers beat a protester wearing a Niqab, an Islamic veil, during clashes near Cairo's downtown Tahrir Square, Egypt, Friday, Dec. 16, 2011. Activists say the clashes began after soldiers severely beat a young man who was part of a sit-in outside the Cabinet building. At background graffiti depicts members of the military ruling council and Arabic reads: "Killer". (AP Photo/Ahmed Ali)

  • In this Saturday, Dec. 24, 2011 photo, men sit near revolutionary murals depicting those who lost their eyes during clashes near Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. Taking control of the streets was critical for the thousands of Egyptians who eventually overthrew their authoritarian leader nearly one year ago, but the battle for freedom of expression continues to be fought by graffiti artists who support the country's military rulers and those who want them to relinquish power. Arabic writing on the wall, far left, reads, "Kafr El-Sheikh revolutionaries." (AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty)

  • An Egyptian woman walks by graffiti depicting a police officer who is accused of targeting the eyes of protesters amid recent clashes between police and demonstrators that left more than 40 people dead, in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • A man prays next to a security barrier in Tahrir Square during a rally to mark the one year anniversary of the uprising that ousted President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo, Egypt, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012. Tens of thousands of Egyptians rallied Wednesday to mark the first anniversary of the country's 2011 uprising, with liberals and Islamists gathering on different sides of Cairo's Tahrir Square in a reflection of the deep political divides that emerged in the year since the downfall of longtime leader Hosni Mubarak. The graffiti at right, in Arabic, reads at top, "freedom," and below "down with the military rule."(AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

  • An Egyptian boy walks in front of anti-Parliamentary elections graffiti at Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Dec. 22, 2011. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • Egyptians line outside a polling station in front of a graffiti showing the Pyramids and Arabic word Egypt, in Giza, Egypt, Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • An Egyptian girl stands by a graffiti depicting a chessboard with a checkmate, at the site of recent clashes between police and demonstrators that left more than 40 people dead, in Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Dec. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)