A North Dakota college football player claims that his coach kicked him off the team after he was seen kissing his boyfriend during a game.

According to LGBT activist Dan Savage, North Dakota State College of Science student Jamie Kuntz traveled with his team to a game against Snow College in Pueblo, Colo. over Labor Day Weekend. Though 18-year-old Kuntz was not scheduled to play the day due to a previous injury, he filmed the game from the press box while sitting with his boyfriend.

"We were getting destroyed," Kuntz told Savage. "The game was a total blowout. And I guess I got bored and so I kissed my boyfriend and some of my teammates saw us."

Still, a number of media outlets including Outsports are drawing attention to another point: Kuntz's boyfriend happens to be 65 years old. Still, Kuntz told HuffPost Gay Voices in a telephone interview that he believes it was solely a matter of homophobia rather than ageism: "I don't think it matters how old he is. If it would've been an older woman, I would've been congratulated for it."

Outsports' Jim Buzinski, who spoke with Kuntz last week, reports that Chuck Parsons, the head football coach at the North Dakota State College of Science, confronted about Kuntz about the kiss while returning to North Dakota on the bus. Kuntz reportedly lied at first, telling Parsons the man he was kissing was his grandfather. He later told his coach that he was gay in a text message, and apologized for lying.

“He said he didn’t care what people did in their personal lives, but it was a big mistake to do that on a football trip," Kuntz recalled to Savage. After Kuntz says he apologized a second time, Parsons handed him a letter dismissing him from the team, calling the player's actions "detrimental" and a "distraction."

As Savage also reports, other members of Kuntz's team have been caught drinking, while others have “criminal charges and convictions," yet remain on the team. "I really didn't even think anyone was looking in the press box, and I don't even know why anyone would be looking in the press box while they were playing the game," Kuntz told HuffPost Gay Voices.

Officials at North Dakota State College of Science, where Kuntz has since withdrawn, have yet to comment on the case. Meanwhile, Kuntz said he hopes to transfer to a new school, possibly the University of Minnesota or the University of Colorado, in time for the spring semester.

"I want to go to a bigger city for a fresh start," Kuntz said. Although Kuntz was not out to his family and many of his friends, he said all have been very supportive: "The only thing my mom is struggling with is the age of my boyfriend, but that's understandable. She'll get used to it eventually."

The case comes just as Baltimore Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo and Minnesota Vikings punter Chris Kluwe have publicly expressed their support for gay marriage.

"I can assure you that gay people getting married will have zero effect on your life. They won't come into your house and steal your children," Kluwe wrote in an open letter to Maryland state delegate Emmett C. Burns, Jr. after Burns himself sent a letter to Ravens owner Steve Biscotti expressing his disdain for Ayanbadejo's support for same-sex marriage. "You know what having these rights will make gay Americans? Full-fledged citizens, just like everyone else, with the freedom to pursue happiness and all that that entails."

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  • Megan Rapinoe

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  • John Amaechi

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  • Gareth Thomas

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  • Martina Navratilova

    The Prague-born tennis pro, who came out as bisexual in 1981, is credited with having "expanded the dialogue on issues of gender and sexuality in sports,"<a href="http://espn.go.com/sportscentury/features/00016378.html" target="_hplink"> according to ESPN</a>. "Martina was the first legitimate superstar who literally came out while she was a superstar," Donna Lopiano, executive director of the Women's Sports Foundation, said. "She exploded the barrier by putting it on the table. She basically said this part of my life doesn't have anything to do with me as a tennis player. Judge me for who I am."

  • Matthew Mitcham

    The Olympic diver, who took home the gold medal in 2008 in the ten meter platform, revealed his sexuality in an <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2008/05/23/1211183107597.html" target="_hplink">exclusive interview</a> with <em>The Sydney Morning Herald</em>. Mitcham, then 20 years old, credited partner Lachlan with helping him battle depression and emotional burnout in the years before his Olympic triumph.

  • Johnny Weir

    Known as much for his colorful fashion sense as his slick moves on the ice, Weir faced intense media scrutiny over his sexual orientation before<a href="http://www.afterelton.com/people/2011/01/johnny-weir-finally-really-out" target="_hplink"> finally coming out</a> in his recently published memoirs. "With people killing themselves and being scared into the closet, I hope that even just one person can gain strength from my story," Weir said at the time. "A lot of the gays got downright angry about my silence. But pressure is the last thing that would make me want to 'join' a community."

  • Billie Jean King

    Unfortunately, the tennis pro's<a href="http://lesbianlife.about.com/od/lesbiansinsports/p/BillieJeanKing.htm" target="_hplink"> 1981 outing</a> was not her choice; she was forced out when her former female lover sued her for palimony and nearly lost all of her commercial endorsements as a result. But her career was far from over, and in 2000, she became the first open lesbian ever to coach an Olympic team.

  • Gus Johnston

    The Australian hockey champ, who retired this year, came out earlier this week in an emotional YouTube video, <em>The Sydney Morning Herald</em> <a href="http://www.smh.com.au/national/playing-it-straight-20111022-1mdj3.html" target="_hplink">is reporting</a>. "I regret immensely that I wasn't strong enough as a leader, that I didn't step up when I was playing and share this about myself,'' he is quoted as saying in the video.

  • Sarah Vaillancourt

    Originally from Quebec, the Canadian hockey champ<a href="http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/othersports/2003817138_goodread02.html" target="_hplink"> decided to stop </a>hiding her sexual orientation while still a freshman at Harvard University. "If they weren't going to accept me on the team," she told <em>The Seattle Times</em>, "I wasn't going to stay."

  • Greg Louganis

    In 1995, the Olympic diving hero (who <a href="http://www.outsports.com/local/2006/0417louganis.htm" target="_hplink">became the first man</a> in 56 years to win two gold medals in diving when he captured the platform and the springboard events in Los Angeles 11 years earlier) shocked fans when he decided<a href="http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/Greg-Louganis-Comes-Out-on-The-Oprah-Show-Video" target="_hplink"> to come out</a> as both gay and HIV-positive on <em>The Oprah Winfrey Show</em>. "People who were close to me -- family and friends -- they knew about my sexuality," he said in 2006. "I just did not discuss my personal life, my sexuality with the media. That was my policy."

  • Billy Bean

    Formerly of the San Diego Padres, baseball player Billy Bean came out in 1999, five years after he retired. Now, however, he says he has regrets about ending his baseball career after just six seasons. "If I had only told my parents, I probably would have played two or three more years and understood that I could come out a step at a time, not have to do it in front of a microphone," he<a href="http://outsports.com/jocktalkblog/2011/09/27/moment-7-major-leaguer-billy-bean-comes-out-still-regrets-retiring/" target="_hplink"> is quoted by</a> Outsports as saying. "And I was completely misguided. I had no mentor. I think that's where the responsibility comes in for people who have lived that experience, and we take for granted that everybody's adjusted and gets it."

  • Rosie Jones

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  • Robert Dover

    The champion rider, who competed in six consecutive Olympics, says he's never had much of a problem with being open about his sexual orientation in the equestrian world. Still, as he he<a href="http://www.outsports.com/olympics/2004/0804robertdover.htm" target="_hplink"> told Outsports</a>, "I did not connect my social life to my work life for many years, and while I never ran away from the issue of my homosexuality, I must admit that I had no real interest in bringing attention to it, especially with the press...what changed everything was a combination of meeting my soul-mate Robert Ross, whom I was so proud to be with that I wanted everyone to know, and the AIDS epidemic which affected so many people dear to me."

  • Ilana Kloss

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