Huffpost Politics

Paul Ryan On Mitt Romney Video: Candidate's Remarks Were 'Obviously Inarticulate' (VIDEO)

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RENO, Nev. — Mitt Romney's running mate is calling the Republican presidential nominee "obviously inarticulate" when he remarked that nearly half of Americans believe they are victims and entitled to a range of government support.

Wisconsin congressman Paul Ryan made the comment in an interview aired Tuesday by KRNV-TV in Reno, Nev.

Romney has defended his remarks, but he has also called them "not elegantly stated."

Asked what he thought of Romney's remarks, Ryan told the Nevada station: "He was obviously inarticulate in making this point." Ryan went on to say the point the Republicans are making is that, under the Obama economy, government dependency is up and economic stagnation is up.

Asked if he thought Romney regrets the remarks, Ryan says he thinks Romney would have said it differently, adding, "that's for sure."

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