Sept 21 (Reuters) - General Motors Co is recalling 473,841 Chevrolet, Pontiac and Saturn sedans globally to fix a condition that could lead the cars to roll when the drivers think they are in park, the No. 1 U.S. automaker said on Friday.

GM said it was aware of four crashes that resulted from the problem, but no injuries.

The company said the recall affected Chevy Malibu, Pontiac G6 and Saturn Aura cars from model years 2007 through 2010 and equipped with four-speed automatic transmissions. GM will repair the condition in which the transmission gear position may not match the gear on the shifter.

The recall affects 426,240 in the United States, 40,029 in Canada and 7,572 in other markets.

Dealers will add a reinforcement to the shift cable end fitting to prevent that part from fracturing, GM said. Owners will be notified by letter to schedule the free repairs at dealers, and those who have had the work done already will be eligible for reimbursement.

The company also said it was recalling 6,475 Chevy Sonic subcompact cars globally because they might not alert the driver to a faulty turn-signal bulb.

Dealers will reprogram an incorrectly calibrated module for the cars built between May 29 and August 29 at GM's Orion, Michigan, plant.

The recall affects 4,716 cars in the United States and 1,759 in other markets.

GM said it was unaware of any crashes or injuries stemming from the problem. Owners will be notified of the Sonic recall by letter beginning Oct. 3.

Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Cars

    Car dealerships are one place where price negotiations are expected. While sales staff like to focus on monthly payments, it's smarter to negotiate the overall price, <a href="http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/13/12-things-you-should-always-haggle-over/#1-cars" target="_hplink">according to <em>Time</em></a>. If you're buying a used car, always be sure to look up the vehicle's actual Blue Book value. Have the car inspected and haggle for a lower price if it needs servicing.

  • Mortgage Rates

    The <a href="http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/pubs/consumer/homes/rea09.shtm" target="_hplink">FTC advises consumers</a> to shop around and negotiate all mortgage rates and fees, and doing so can save thousands of dollars. Those with good credit scores can often negotiate for a lower APR, while everyone should discuss lowering or eliminating certain <a href="http://www.lender411.com/five-mortgage-closing-costs-you-can-negotiate-lower/" target="_hplink">closing fees</a> and processing charges.

  • Rent

    Monthly rent rates are totally negotiable, especially when you're renewing a lease. "If you pay on time every month, it'll be worth it for your landlord to offer you a better rate than to take a gamble with a new tenant," says HuffPost Money Editor Emily Cohn.

  • Cable/Phone/Internet Services

    Customers often get caught by surprise when their monthly service charges skyrocket due to expired promotional rates. "Generally, keep track of what competitors are currently charging new customers, and indicate to your current provider that you are considering switching. Tell them the deal you saw, and ask them to match or beat," Edgar Dworsky, founder of ConsumerWorld.org <a href="http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/13/12-things-you-should-always-haggle-over/#11-phone-tv-and-internet-service" target="_hplink">told <em>Time</em></a>.

  • Credit Card Fees

    While not everyone is capable of haggling for a lower interest rate, you may have luck negotiating out of penalty fees, especially if you're generally a good customer. If you're looking into opening a new card, be sure to <a href="http://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0711/7-Fees-That-You-Should-Always-Negotiate.aspx#axzz24lTQxmHG" target="_hplink">mention competitors' offers and rates</a> to the company representative.

  • Gym Memberships

    Customers can often negotiate the elimination of annual fees or registration costs when beginning or renewing memberships. Often, the <a href="http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/13/12-things-you-should-always-haggle-over/#12-subscriptions-and-memberships" target="_hplink">threat that you may take your business elsewhere</a> is enough to bend a customer-service rep into giving you a deal, according to <em>Time</em>.

  • Home And Yard Maintenance

    With the home <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/june-jobs-report-unemployment-rate_n_1653579.html" target="_hplink">construction industry still struggling</a>, maintenance workers are more willing to negotiate prices for services. Discuss <a href="http://finance.yahoo.com/news/pf_article_111978.html" target="_hplink">opting for lower-cost materials</a> and discounts on labor, advises Yahoo Finance.

  • Clothing

    Be sure to inspect clothes off the rack before bringing them to the checkout counter. If you find a pull or a small stain, pointing it out to a salesperson might snag you a discount on the item.

  • Anything Used

    If you're going to haggle on anything, it should be on used goods. You should take the price tag at a garage sale or antique shop as a suggestion.

  • Vacation Packages

    Much like credit card companies, travel sites compete with each other for customers, so make sure to shop around before booking a vacation. If you're using a travel agent, don't be afraid to reference deals you find online. If a travel site or agent won't <a href="http://moneyland.time.com/2012/08/13/12-things-you-should-always-haggle-over/#8-vacation-lodging" target="_hplink">budge on the per-night rate</a>, they may offer a deal on transportation or throw in a perk, like a spa service.