This clairvoyant can meet you for the first time and know an uncomfortable amount of information about your life — but that's because you've already given it all to him.

In a video released by the Belgian government, strangers in Brussels were invited to meet Dave Guillame and were told it was for his new TV show.

"Interesting love life," he tells a blonde woman, "I see three? Four people?"

"Not a lot of people know that," she responds.

"Do you know your bank account number?" he asks another, then tells her he knows she has a negative balance and starts listing her account numbers off one by one.

But after wowing guests with his amazing powers of seeing, a curtain falls away to reveal a team of reportedly "top-notch" hackers who had been tapping into the visitors' lives all along.

"Your entire life is online .... and it might be used against you," the video ominously warns in the end.

"Be vigilant."

But being vigilant for some is often an afterthought. Gawker reported on a Twitter account called @NeedADebitCard that "shames" users by rewteeting those who have tweeted pictures of their credit card with the number visible.

In January, thieves created a false profile with stolen online photos of a woman and her two-year-old girl asking for donations toward a heart transplant the child needed — but her daughter had already passed away. ID Analytics estimates nearly 140,000 children's identities are stolen every year.

Belgium's campaign promoting safe Internet use is just one of many attempts by governments and organizations to raise awareness about keeping your online private information safe.

The Center for Safe Internet Pharmacies released a PSA in July warning that many online pharmacies are illegal and sell drugs that are tainted, ineffective or something else than what you ordered.

In the U.S., the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) identity theft campaign is called "AvoID Theft: Deter, Detect, Defend" and provides information on how to prevent identity fraud and what to do if you think identity has been stolen.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • You Luv 'Call Me Maybe'

    Remember when you were having that <em>really bad</em> day and blasted Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe" 23 times on Spotfiy? Yeah... well, we witnessed that low moment via your Facebook profile's ticker, the real-time mini feed located in the upper right hand corner of Facebook pages. If you don't want to share your (possibly embarrassing) musical preferences with your Facebook friends, make sure to turn off the "Share to Facebook" button (at the top right of your Spotify desktop app).

  • You Can't Resist Clicking On Sketchy, Sexy Video Links

    Some Facebook apps, like Socialcam, are designed to make you click on content by using sleazy, eye-catching headlines. "Socialcam's 'trending' videos read like a bunch of crossovers between the 'American Pie' franchise and 'Jackass,'" <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/socialcams-so-sleazy-its-insightful/2012/06/05/gJQAor3FGV_story.html" target="_hplink">The Washington Post wrote</a> in June. If you're a SocialCam user, remember that the spam-like titles of videos you view automatically pop up on your profile, so your friends all might know when you've watched "CraZy ThReeSom!" or "Two Wasted Chicks" last week.

  • You Can't Get Enough Sideboob In Your News

    Glancing at a juicy article on how Miley Cyrus <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/22/miley-cyrus-side-boob-actress-sex-scenes-losing-virginity_n_1536026.html" target="_hplink">flashed some sideboob</a>? While this wouldn't phase some Facebook users, others would prefer not to have anything with the word "sideboob" published on their profiles or in friends' News Feeds. Facebook's social reader apps track the articles you read, and with permission you grant when first downloading the app, then post the stories automatically to your wall. So be wary of those scandalous headlines promising half-naked pictures.

  • How Old You Are

    Some people love getting birthday wishes via Facebook. But putting your your full date of birth on any social networking site means strangers are privy to information that can be used to steal your identity. If you want to keep your birthday up online, consider taking the safe route and nix the year.

  • You Went Out Boozin' Every Night Last Week

    Friends or apps can now tag your location via Facebook. But maybe you don't want everyone to know you're visiting that neighborhood dive bar for the fourth night this week. "There isn't a specific setting to block people from tagging you in a post that includes a location," <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/location/privacy" target="_hplink">Facebook's site reads</a>. This means if you don't want your whereabouts known, you'll have to change your Timeline setting to approve all tags before they're posted, or manually remove the tags once they've been published.

  • You Are Addicted To Artsy Pics Of Beaches And Breakfast Food

    Photo-sharing app Instagram is relatively direct in telling you where your pictures are posted. But you might unknowingly be photo-spamming your friend's Facebook feeds by letting the app re-post every picture you "like" onto Facebook. And things could get a little dicey depending on <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/30/instagram-porn_n_1842761.html?utm_hp_ref=technology" target="_hplink">what types of images you view.</a> Luckily this feature is easy to change. Just go into the settings options on your Instagram app, click the "Share Settings" tab and turn off the setting that shares "Liked" photos to your Facebook timeline.

  • What Your Kids' Names Are

    Tagging or naming younger children on Facebook can be a dangerous move. Similar to putting your full birthday on the interent, you could be offering up too much information and enabling a breach of privacy. "If your child isn't on Facebook and someone includes his or her name in a caption, ask that person to remove the name," <a href="http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine-archive/2010/june/electronics-computers/social-insecurity/7-things-to-stop-doing-on-facebook/index.htm" target="_hplink">Consumer Reports advises</a>.