Apple launched its maps application earlier this month, much to the chagrin of the many Google Maps fans of the iPhone world. The product was indeed such a spectacular failure that Apple's CEO Tim Cook eventually apologized for the half-baked idea, urging users to head to other sites for their mapping needs until the product is fixed.

Of course, Apple isn't the only company to launch a faulty product. Check out some of the biggest product launch fails of all time below:

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  • Apple Maps

    Apple CEO <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/28/tim-cook-apology-apple-maps_n_1922378.html">Tim Cook issued an apology</a> Friday for the company's new Maps app. Cook directed users to other map apps in the Apple store or websites like Google or Nokia until Apple's version is fixed.

  • Bank Of America Debit Card Fee

    Bank of America announced last year that it was planning to charge customers a $5 fee to use their debit cards. After an intense customer backlash, the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/01/bank-of-america-debit-card-fee_n_1069425.html">company dropped the plan</a>.

  • New Coke

    In 1985 <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7209828/ns/us_news/t/it-seemed-good-idea-time/#.UGXCa_mfHll">Coca-Cola decided to mess</a> with its iconic product, according to NBCNews.com. The result: Epic failure. With customers comparing the change to trampling the American flag, the company pulled the product after just a few months.

  • Crystal Pepsi

    Pepsi <a href="http://investorplace.com/2011/02/loud-sun-chips-pepsi-branding-disaster-failure/">launched a clear version</a> of its cola drink in 1993, but the product didn't last long. The company pulled it from the shelves in 1994, according to InvestorPlace.com.

  • Lawn Darts

    Lawn darts, everyone's favorite 1980s backyard game, turned out to be pretty dangerous. The Consumer Product Safety Commission <a href="http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/gadgets/toys/4347051#slide-1">recalled the toys in December 1988</a> after many were injured and three people died sending the steel darts through the air, according to Popular Mechanics.

  • Ford Edsel

    In 1957, Ford launched the Edsel, a car the company billed as hot and revolutionary, according to the <em>Washington Post</em>. Problem: <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/09/03/AR2007090301419.html">It turned out to be sort of "blah."</a> By the time the company pulled the car in 1959, it had lost about $250 million.

  • Window's Vista

    When it debuted in January, 2007, Microsoft's newest operating system was <a href="http://www.spike.com/articles/n2yhee/the-top-10-epic-fails-in-product-launch-history?page=2">slammed by consumers</a>. As a result, businesses and personal computer users were slow to adopt it, according to Spike.

  • The Arch Deluxe

    McDonald's launched a luxury burger geared towards the adult set in 1996 with a <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1998/04/19/magazine/steal-this-burger.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm">$100 million advertising campaign</a>, according to <em>The New York Times</em>. But the mature hamburger was ultimately a flop.

  • Apple Newton

    In 1993, Apple <a href="http://www.dailyfinance.com/photos/top-25-biggest-product-flops-of-all-time/#photo-11">launched the PDA device, a precursor to the palm pilot</a>, according to DailyFinance, but it turned out to be a bust, thanks to its high price and bulkiness. The company pulled the Newton in 1998.

  • Sony Betamax

    Sony poured <a href="http://articles.latimes.com/1989-09-28/business/fi-409_1_sony-corp">20 years of research into its Betamax</a> videocassette recorder, but was ultimately beat out by the competition, according to the <em>Los Angeles Times</em>. Matsushita developed the VHS system, which became more popular among companies making the devices -- and companies making films -- rendering the Betamax obsolete.

  • Qwickster

    In September of last year, Neflix announced that it would be separating its online streaming service from its DVD service and calling <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/30/tech-fails-2011_n_1173313.html">the DVD branch "Qwickster."</a> The proposal turned out to be such an epic fail that the company scrapped the experiment last November before it even launched.

  • Clairol's "Touch Of Yogurt" Shampoo

    When Clairol came out with its yogurt-based shampoo in 1979, they thought it would be a success, thanks to <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/06/worst-product-launches-ever_n_1182219.html">widespread interest in the test marketing</a> phase. But it turned out to be a flop; customers apparently don't want to put food in their hair.

  • BlackBerry Playbook

    BlackBerry launched its Playbook without apps for email, contacts or any of the other things people use tablets for. The result: The <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/30/tech-fails-2011_n_1173313.html#s577006&title=BlackBerry_PlayBook">company slashed prices</a> on the device as the holidays approached.

  • HD DVD

    Toshiba's HD DVD experiment ended up <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/blog/storage/hd-dvd-post-mortem-why-did-toshiba-fail/294">being trounced by Sony's</a> Blu-Ray player as studios and customers opted for the latter.

  • The Yugo

    The car deemed by many to be one of the worst vehicles ever exported to the U.S. was met with widespread criticism when it <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500395_162-4616249.html">landed on American shores in 1986</a>. Available for just $3,990, the car did terribly in crash tests, according to CBS News.

  • Nike Black And Tan Sneakers

    Nike launched a sneaker (not pictured) in the lead up to St. Patrick's Day that offended some Irish people. The shoe called "Black and Tan"<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/14/nike-black-and-tan_n_1344197.html"> shares its name</a> with a British paramilitary unit that attacked Irish civilians in the 1920s.