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Marijuana Legalization TV Ad Says: 'Let's Have Marijuana Tax Money Go To Our Schools Rather Than Criminals'

10/03/2012 03:13 pm ET | Updated Oct 04, 2012

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol has released a new television ad in support of Colorado's Amendment 64 that will be airing across the state with a clear message to voters this November: Money generated from marijuana sales should go to Colorado schools, not to drug cartels.

"We all know where the money from non-medical marijuana sales is currently going," the narrator says as dollar signs cascade down from Colorado and into Mexico. "It doesn't need to be that way."

The narrator in the ad goes on to state: "If we pass Amendment 64, Colorado businesses would profit and tax revenues would pay for public services and the reconstruction of our schools. Let's vote for the good guys and against the bad guys -- let's have marijuana tax money go to our schools rather than criminals in Mexico."

Amendment 64 has received support from both Democrats and Republicans in Colorado, the NAACP, former cops and other members of the law enforcement community as well as more than 100 professors from around the nation. The measure appears to be popular among Colorado voters with several recent state polls showing wide support.

If marijuana is legalized in Colorado it would be taxed and regulated similar to alcohol and tobacco. It would give state and local governments the ability to control and tax the sale of small amounts of marijuana to adults age 21 and older. According to the Associated Press, analysts project that that tax revenue could generate somewhere between $5 million and $22 million a year in the state. An economist whose study was funded by a pro-pot group projects as much as a $60 million boost by 2017.

Voters in Colorado, Oregon and Washington state will all be considering whether or not to legalize marijuana for recreational use this November. This is the second time that Colorado voters will decide on pot legislation -- state voters considered and rejected a similar recreational pot legalization initiative in 2006.

States where medical marijuana is legal:

Legal Marijuana Across The U.S.

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