A North Carolina teacher says her student "spiked her coffee with butt-enhancing pills."

According to WBTV, 61-year-old Ellen Vick, a teacher at Independence High School in Charlotte, N.C., told police Monday that a student put a "butt-enhancing" drug in her coffee during class.

Investigators say the drug was "GluteBoost," a supplement that claims to plump up one's derriere.

As WCNC notes: "One month's supply with of GluteBoost sells for $50 on the company's website. The pills [claim to] use "natural supplements that will enhance your butt size."

Police are reportedly still investigating the incident, and there have not been any arrests. The student, however, is said to have been "disciplined according to the district code of conduct," WBTV reports.

This is not the first time that a student has gotten into hot water for spiking a teacher's beverage.

According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, three eighth-graders reportedly spiked a teacher's soft drink with Germ-X hand sanitizer in 2008.

And last May, a high school student in California allegedly "slipped dry erase cleaning fluid and bleach into her teacher's coffee mug when she wasn't looking," NBC News reports.

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  • Food

    <strong>2 in 3</strong> teachers <strong>(67%)</strong> purchase food or snacks to satisfy the basic nutritional needs of their students -- even ones who are already enrolled in their schools' free or reduced-price meal program.

  • Clothing

    <strong>1 in 3</strong> teachers purchase clothing for children, including jackets, hats and gloves <strong>(30%)</strong> or shoes and shoe laces <strong>(15%)</strong>.

  • Toothbrushes

    <strong>18 percent</strong> of teachers purchase personal care items, such as toothbrushes and sanitary products.

  • Hygiene Products

    Nearly <strong>1 in 3</strong> teachers <strong>(29%)</strong> purchase items such as toilet paper and soap that their school cannot provide enough of due to budget cuts.

  • Field Trips

    <strong>More than half</strong> of all teachers have paid the costs of field trips for students who couldn't afford to participate otherwise.

  • Alarm Clocks

    <strong>Several teachers</strong> reported purchasing alarm clocks for students. Due to work schedules or family circumstances, guardians were unable to wake their children for school, which led to absences and academic underperformance.