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Afghanistan: Footage Appears To Show Drunken, Stoned U.S. Security Contractors (VIDEO)

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Cellphone footage obtained exclusively by ABC appears to show a group of drunken, stoned U.S. security contractors in the Afghan capital of Kabul.

In the video, a bare-chested man identified as a security manager working for Jorge Scientific hobbles around, barely conscious in front of the camera. A second man, who is said to be the company's medical officer, stares into the lens, apparently under influence of drugs.

ABC reports that Jorge Scientific had won a $47 million U.S. government contract to train Afghan police. The network says it obtained the video from two former employees of the company, who claim similar incidents occurred frequently.

ABC will air the full video tonight on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer and Nightline.

The U.S. is scheduled to withdraw most of its troops in Afghanistan by 2014.

The Wall Street Journal notes that while contractors have played an important role in the war effort before, they are expected to take on additional responsibilities as the U.S. forces are set to withdraw.

"As the U.S. and its allies prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan, private contractors have taken on roles traditionally considered in the purview of the military, from flying spyplanes to operating drones and sifting intelligence," the newspaper explains.

This is not the first controversial video implicating U.S. security personel in Afghanistan. In January 2012, a video surfaced which showed U.S. Marines urinating on corpses of Afghan fighters. And in April 2012, the Los Angeles Times released a photo of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan posing with the remains of suicide bombers.

Contacted by ABC, Jorge Scientific said that it has taken "decisive action to correct the unacceptable behavior of a limited number of employees." The Pentagon told ABC that the military was unaware of the video until contacted by the network.

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