Four years after throwing its support behind then-presidential candidate Barack Obama, the Orlando Sentinel is saying it's time to change course.

In an editorial announcing the paper's endorsement of GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, the editorial board of the large Florida daily delivers some harsh criticisms of the president, while admitting that they're not entirely satisfied with Romney's positions.

"We have little confidence that Obama would be more successful managing the economy and the budget in the next four years," the editorial board writes, after outlining their displeasure with nagging deficits and a slow economic recovery. "For that reason, though we endorsed him in 2008, we are recommending Romney in this race."

The editorial goes on to accuse Obama of not pursuing sufficient bipartisan efforts to tackle the debt and deficit, while praising Romney for making entitlement reform a prominent campaign issue. The paper also makes clear that its opposition to Obama doesn't stem from conspiracy theories or fringe arguments about his supposed lack of patriotism, and that its support for Romney doesn't come without some reservations.

"Romney is not our ideal candidate for president," the board writes. "We've been turned off by his appeals to social conservatives and immigration extremists. Like most presidential hopefuls, including Obama four years ago, Romney faces a steep learning curve on foreign policy."

The Sentinel is not alone in expressing dissatisfaction with a candidate they endorsed in 2008. The Tennessean, a pro-Obama paper four years ago, came out with a Romney endorsement earlier this week. The New York Observer, owned by Donald Trump's son-in-law, also recently announced its support for Romney after backing Obama in 2008.

Romney also picked up the endorsements of some more reliably conservative newspapers this month, two of which could provide a swing state boost. Romney's campaign, aware that Obama trounced 2008 GOP presidential candidate John McCain in newspaper endorsements, has been making a play for support from big papers in battleground states, meeting with editorial boards in the hopes of winning them over.

One other key swing state paper, the Denver Post, also made its pick on Friday, endorsing Obama. The Post also supported him in 2008.

UPDATE: 2:25 p.m. -- The Salt Lake Tribune also endorsed Obama on Friday, criticizing Romney for "lavishing vastly diverse audiences with words, any words, they would trade their votes to hear." While not a swing state -- it's gone red for the last 11 presidential elections -- Romney has strong ties to Utah both through its large Mormon population and his overseeing of the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City. The paper also endorsed Obama in 2008.

UPDATE: 3:25 p.m. -- Another large Florida daily newspaper, the Tampa Bay Times, offered an endorsement for Obama on Friday. It supported Obama in 2008 as well.

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  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney participate in the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, left, addresses President Barack Obama during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/Pool-Shannon Stapleton)

  • President Barack Obama, left, speaks to Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/Pool-Win McNamee)

  • Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama speak during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speak during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, in Hempstead, N.Y. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • HEMPSTEAD, NY - OCTOBER 16: Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) speaks as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) listens during a town hall style debate at Hofstra University October 16, 2012 in Hempstead, New York. During the second of three presidential debates, the candidates fielded questions from audience members on a wide variety of issues. (Photo by Shannon Stapleton-Pool/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Republican Presidential nominee Mitt Romney (rear) and US President Barack Obama debate on October 16, 2012 during the second of three presidential debates at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. AFP PHOTO / Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Republican Presidential nominee Mitt Romney (L) and US President Barack Obama debate on October 16, 2012 during the second of three presidential debates at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney both speak at the same time during the second presidential debate October 16, 2012 at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama and Republican Presidential nominee Mitt Romney debate on October 16, 2012 at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. Undecided voters asked questions during a town hall format. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • US President Barack Obama (R) and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) participate in the second presidential debate, the only held in a townhall format, at the David Mack Center at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, October 16, 2012, moderated by CNN's Candy Crowley. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)