Huffpost Politics

NDAA Trends On Twitter During The Debate

Posted: Updated:
President Barack Obama greets Mitt Romney before the final presidential debate on Oct. 22, 2012. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)
President Barack Obama greets Mitt Romney before the final presidential debate on Oct. 22, 2012. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Among the many topics not discussed in Monday night's debate was the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act, a law signed by President Barack Obama that strengthens the government's power to detain U.S. citizens indefinitely without charge. Many activists see the NDAA as a devastating assault on civil liberties, but the debate moderator, Bob Schieffer, chose not to ask about it, and neither of the candidates brought it up on his own.

One place where it did receive a lot of mentions was on Twitter.

Stopndaa.org, a website paid for by the activist groups Revolution Truth and Demand Progress, had posted a rallying call to anti-NDAA protestors, exhorting them to get #stopndaa trending on Twitter during the debate.

It seems to have worked. Within a half hour after the debate began, the slogan was trending and, according to a hashtag analytics site referenced by Salon.com, the tweets hit 31,600 per hour.

An online post credited to the protest group Anonymous and the website Suicide Girls also joined in the call for "tweet jacking."

"The last of the Presidential Debates is upon us," read the post. "Those of us who are awake to the human rights travesty known as the NDAA and are concerned for our civil liberties have been ignored completely."

Also on HuffPost:

Close
7 Ways To Get Yourself Indefinitely Detained
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

NDAA protest hits Twitter during debate

Twitter interest in final debate remains high

 
  Obama Romney
Obama Romney
332 206
Obama leading
Obama won
Romney leading
Romney won
Popular Vote
33 out of 100 seats are up for election. 51 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Holdover
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats* Republicans
Current Senate 53 47
Seats gained or lost +2 -2
New Total 55 45
* Includes two independent senators expected to caucus with the Democrats: Angus King (Maine) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.).
All 435 seats are up for election. 218 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats Republicans
Seats won 201 234
Click for Full Results
Register To Vote