Every version of the tale is different, but certain elements persist: A wanderer encounters somebody disrespecting a corpse that, in life, had not paid its debts. Outraged by this behavior, the wanderer pays off the man’s debts, and then continues his wandering. Down the road, he faces hardships of his own, and is only saved by a travelling companion -- a stranger -- who helps him avoid disaster. In the end, the stranger reveals himself to be the spirit of the body who was redeemed at the beginning of the tale.

The grateful dead.

"You can’t get more Jewish than that," Yaakov Dov Miller says.

A Jewish musician who followed the Grateful Dead in the late '80s and early '90s, Miller will co-lead "Blues for Challah: Second Set," the second-annual gathering of Jewish Deadheads at the Isabella Freedman retreat center.

Organizers got the idea for a Grateful Dead-themed Jewish weekend while hosting another retreat, "Sacred Undertaking: Embracing Life by Caring for the Dead," which explored the traditions and rituals of the Jewish secret society known as the Chevra Kadisha, those responsible for watching the bodies of the dead before burial.

“What blew my mind as a very Jewish value from the very beginning -- and this is really what it’s about -- is that the story of grateful dead is about Livayat HaMet and Chesed shel Emes," Miller says.

He's referring to the Jewish practice of accompanying a dead body to the grave, a selfless act that is perhaps the most sacred of all Jewish rituals related to death. After all, one could ask, who's going to repay the favor?

The grateful dead folktale, from which the iconic California band got its name, provides an answer: an eternal, thankful spirit.

Even from the grave, kindness repays kindness. Physical life may end, but the song echoes on forever.

As it is written: "The fields are full of dancing / Full of singing and romancing / 'Cause the music never stopped."

Below you'll find a collection of photos, anecdotes, scripture and quotes that illustrate the deep connection between the Grateful Dead's psychedelic soundscapes and Judaism's spiritual practices and insights. Please contribute!

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  • "<a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah: Second Set</a>," the second-annual Grateful Dead Shabbat at the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center, will take place at the end of November. <br><br> For a wonderful essay on this phenomenon, read Douglas M. Gertner's "<a href="http://www.jambands.com/features/1999/02/15/who-were-the-grateful-dead-and-why-were-they-always-following-jews-around?1">Who were the Grateful Dead and why were they always following Jews around?</a>"

  • Interspersed throughout the slideshow is a Jewish version of the grateful dead folktale, which was read at the retreat. "The Grateful Dead" is from "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Miriams-Tambourine-Jewish-Folktales-paperbacks/dp/0192821369">Miriam's Tambourine: Jewish Folktales from Around the World</a>" by Howard Schwartz (slide 1 of 5)<br><br> The <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Tobit">Book of Tobit</a>, an apocryphal text originally written in Hebrew but never included in the Jewish canon, is one of the <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=LbZPv-2LO6YC&pg=PA66&lpg=PA66&dq=Book+of+Tobit+grateful+dead+hebrew&source=bl&ots=2XSKcIPR0g&sig=LrebmkzOwvm0ABEtsq4ot-YaEyc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=XISSULPxOqbo0gHK-YCIDg&ved=0CFUQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=grateful%20dead%20hebrew&f=false">earliest known uses of the grateful dead motif</a>.

  • Let my inspiration flow<br> in token lines suggesting rhythm<br> that will not forsake me<br> till my tale is told and done<br> <br> While the firelight's aglow<br> strange shadows in the flames will grow<br> till things we've never seen<br> will seem familiar ...<br><br> The storyteller makes no choice<br> soon you will not hear his voice<br> his job is to shed light<br> and not to master<br><br> ...from "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/terr.html">Terrapin Station</a>," lyrics by Robert Hunter, music by Jerry Garcia<br><br>Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • "...there’s lots of souls of the world out there that need light. And that’s what we’re supposed to do in this world is spread light." <br><br> -- <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhBd16StBUo&noredirect=1">Rabbi Moshe Shur</a>, who will lead traditional services at the Blues for Challah retreat in addition to giving a talk titled, "Jerry, Shlomo, and Me: Tales from the Golden Road"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • "Make me to hear joy and gladness; that the bones which Thou hast crushed may rejoice." <br><br> -- <a href="http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt2651.htm">Psalm 51</a>

  • A Jewish version of the grateful dead folktale, which was read at the retreat. "The Grateful Dead" is from "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Miriams-Tambourine-Jewish-Folktales-paperbacks/dp/0192821369">Miriam's Tambourine: Jewish Folktales from Around the World</a>" by Howard Schwartz (slide 2 of 5)<br><br> <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0505.html#rappoport">Here is another version of this story.</a>

  • Wake up to find out <br> that you are the eyes of the World <br> but the heart has its beaches <br> its homeland and thoughts of its own <br> Wake now, discover that you <br> are the song that the morning brings <br> but the heart has its seasons <br> its evenings and songs of its own <br><br> ...from "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/eyes.html">Eyes of the World</a>," lyrics by Robert Hunter, music by Jerry Garcia

  • <strong><em>"Wake up to find out that you are the eyes of the world."</em></strong><br><br> “Jews are interested in liminal states. … psychedelic culture is very much of that. It’s the space between the physical and the spiritual.” <br><br> -- Daniel Sieradski, 33, who will lead a talk at <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> titled "The Forbidden Tree of Knowledge: Psychedelics & the Bible." Sieradski, a web designer and organizer of <a href="http://occupyjudaism.org/">Occupy Judaism</a>, is working on a book about the topic.

  • "If you cannot concentrate when you pray, <br> search for melodies and choose a tune you like. <br> Your heart will then feel what you say,<br> for it is the song that makes your heart respond."<br><br> -- Sefer Hasidim, found in Mickey Hart's "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Into-Sound-Magic-Music/dp/1888358238">Spirit Into Sound: The Magic of Music</a>"

  • A Jewish version of the grateful dead folktale, which was read at the retreat. "The Grateful Dead" is from "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Miriams-Tambourine-Jewish-Folktales-paperbacks/dp/0192821369">Miriam's Tambourine: Jewish Folktales from Around the World</a>" by Howard Schwartz (slide 3 of 5)<br><br> <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0505.html#rappoport">Here is another version of this story.</a>

  • Look out of any window<br> any morning, any evening, any day<br> Maybe the sun is shining<br> birds are winging or<br> rain is falling from a heavy sky -<br> What do you want me to do,<br> to do for you to see you through?<br> this is all a dream we dreamed <br> one afternoon long ago ...<br><br> Walk into splintered sunlight<br> Inch your way through dead dreams<br> to another land<br> Maybe you're tired and broken<br> Your tongue is twisted<br> with words half spoken <br> and thoughts unclear<br> What do you want me to do<br> to do for you to see you through<br> A a box of rain will ease the pain <br> and love will see you through ...<br><br> It's just a box of rain<br> I don't know who put it there<br> Believe it if you need it<br> or leave it if you dare<br> But it's just a box of rain<br> or a ribbon for your hair<br> Such a long long time to be gone <br> and a short time to be there<br><br> ...from "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/box.html">Box of Rain</a>," lyrics by Robert Hunter, music by Phil Lesh<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • <em><strong>"Such a long long time to be gone, and a short time to be there."</strong></em> -- "Box of Rain," lyrics by Robert Hunter<br><br> "That song, for one thing, resonates at the same level, for me, that the Shema does. So when I hear that song, it’s the same -- I get the same reaction. The Shema for me is a very powerful piece and it has always been with me, even when I was away from Judaism."<br><br> -- Leah Chava “Hobbit” Reiner, 51 (pictured), will lead a class at the Blues for Challah retreat on Grateful Dead lyrics as sacred text.<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • But I'll get back<br> on my feet someday<br> The good Lord willing<br> if He says I may<br> 'cause I know the life I'm<br> livin's no good<br> I'll get a new start<br> live the life I should...<br><br> I'll get up and fly away<br> I'll get up and<br> fly away...<br> ...fly away<br><br> ...from "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/wrat.html">Wharf Rat</a>," lyrics by Robert Hunter, music by Jerry Garcia

  • A Jewish version of the grateful dead folktale, which was read at the retreat. "The Grateful Dead" is from "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Miriams-Tambourine-Jewish-Folktales-paperbacks/dp/0192821369">Miriam's Tambourine: Jewish Folktales from Around the World</a>" by Howard Schwartz (slide 4 of 5)<br><br> <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0505.html#rappoport">Here is another version of this story.</a>

  • She had rings on her fingers and <br> bells on her shoes,<br> And I knew without askin' she was<br> into the blues <br> Scarlet begonias <br> tucked into her curls<br> I knew right away <br> she was not like other girls--<br> other girls ...<br><br> I ain't often right<br> but I've never been wrong<br> It seldom turns out the way<br> it does in the song<br> Once in a while<br> you get shown the light<br> in the strangest of places<br> if you look at it right<br><br> ...from "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/scarlet.html">Scarlet Begonias</a>," lyrics by Robert Hunter, music by Jerry Garcia

  • <em><strong>"Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right."</strong></em><br><br> "...to progress as a woman in Judaism, you need to be outside the box. ... 'Scarlet Begonias' has always reminded me of that."<br><br> --Rikki SaNogueria, 25, Program Coordinator for the Isabella Freedman Jewish Retreat Center, host of <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a>, a Grateful Dead Shabbaton<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • "Music has many sides. It can seduce or frighten you. It can rattle your bones. It can let you see God."<br><br> -- Mickey Hart in "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Into-Sound-Magic-Music/dp/1888358238">Spirit Into Sound: The Magic of Music</a>"<br><br> Photo: Legendary drummer Mickey Hart jumps at the end of a six minute drumming session for Rock the Rhythm, Beat the Odds, a giant drum circle event at the College of the Canyons Cougar Stadium in Santa Clarita, Calif., Friday, May 18, 2012. More than 7,200 sixth and seventh graders from all five districts of the Santa Clarita Valley school district and some 4,000 community members participated to get the Guiness Book of World's Records for the largest drum circle. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)</p>

  • A Jewish version of the grateful dead folktale, which was read at the retreat. "The Grateful Dead" is from "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Miriams-Tambourine-Jewish-Folktales-paperbacks/dp/0192821369">Miriam's Tambourine: Jewish Folktales from Around the World</a>" by Howard Schwartz (slide 5 of 5)<br><br> <a href="http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0505.html#rappoport">Here is another version of this story.</a>

  • <em><a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/darkstar.html" target="_hplink">Dark star</a> crashes<br> pouring its light<br>into ashes<br><br>Reason tatters<br>the forces tear loose<br>from the axis<br><br>Searchlight casting<br>for faults in the<br>clouds of delusion<br><br>shall we go, <br>you and I<br>While we can?<br><br>Through<br> the transitive nightfall <br>of diamonds<br><br>Mirror shatters<br>in formless reflections<br>of matter<br><br>Glass hand dissolving<br>to ice petal flowers<br>revolving<br><br>Lady in velvet<br>recedes<br>in the nights of goodbye<br><br>Shall we go,<br>you and I<br>While we can?<br><br>Through<br>the transitive nightfall<br>of diamonds<br><br> Photo: The Dead perform at the Izod Center on April 28, 2009 in East Rutherford, New Jersey. (Photo by Cory Schwartz/Getty Images)

  • "...if we receive communally light from each other, let’s transfer it back -- many fold. And add light to this world that needs a lot of light. So I give you a blessing that we all are, as it were, light-givers. And we should transfer the light of ourselves, which is sometimes ignited through experience, through memory, through future, and we should transfer it to others."<br><br> -- <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhBd16StBUo&noredirect=1">Rabbi Moshe Shur</a>, who will lead traditional services at the Blues for Challah retreat in addition to giving a talk titled, "Jerry, Shlomo, and Me: Tales from the Golden Road"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • "In Judaism, we’re trying to live at that high. We’re trying to live and feel connected. And music is obviously the biggest connecter to whatever it is you’re trying to connect to." <br><br> -- Mordechai ‘Motti’ Shur, 22 (pictured), son of <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhBd16StBUo&noredirect=1">Rabbi Moshe Shur</a>, who will lead traditional services at the Blues for Challah retreat in addition to giving a talk titled, "Jerry, Shlomo, and Me: Tales from the Golden Road"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • "We pray with it,<br> Dance to it,<br> Sing and have fun with it,<br> We pass the day,<br> Drive the car, <br> Wash the windows,<br> Sip some wine,<br> We eat our meals,<br> Wash our clothes and<br> bury our dead with it."<br><br> -- Mickey Hart in "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Into-Sound-Magic-Music/dp/1888358238">Spirit Into Sound: The Magic of Music</a>"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • “I didn’t make this up, I assure you. If you read enough of all the classic texts, from Buddhism to Judaism, all the religions are really talking about rhythm-getting in time, in tune. Religion is really a tuning fork -- you’re reaching out for transcendence, and there’s something out there, perhaps a spirit -- and you’re trying to connect with the outside world … and that’s transformative in nature. There’s a trance that you get into. Think of chants, or your cantor reading from the Torah, all of these traditions. What they’re doing is giving up the breath, which is the holiest thing you really have to give up. On the breath comes the word, the sound, the vibration. So you’re vibrating and trying to connect with the other vibrations that are out there. I believe if there is a God, it’s a vibration. God is sound. I mean, I don’t sway towards the doctrines of any organized religion, but I will say that happiness is what real religion is all about -- trying to find personal happiness and a collective happiness. All religions have the same goal of happiness: They just have different ways of going about it, but it’s structured into different belief systems. I don’t mean to marginalize anyone’s God. There are a lot of them out there, but whose is the supreme? Who’s to say? But I know it has to do with some kind of a vibration. Most religions are basically the same in many respects. The words are different, the rituals are different, but they’re all looking for happiness, transcendence, love, joy, good families, a good life for themselves and others.”<br><br> -- Mickey Hart, in an article by Dan Sieradski for <em>Lifestyles Magazine</em><br><br> Photo by Elliot Newhouse of Mickey Hart backstage at Madison Square Song in 1979</p>

  • "Music is often the preferred medium for communication with the gods. Speech gains magical potency when it rides on a melody or rhythm. Sung prayers are more powerful than spoken ones."<br><br> -- Mickey Hart in "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Into-Sound-Magic-Music/dp/1888358238">Spirit Into Sound: The Magic of Music</a>"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • In November 2009, <a href="http://etzchayim.org/">Congregation Etz Chayim</a> in Palo Alto, Calif., hosted a <a href="http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/40510/at-a-grateful-dead-shabbat-yahs-got-everything-i-need/">Grateful Dead Kabbalat Shabbat</a> service, which featured a 30-page prayer packet (<a href="https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:qlgWt4DbNM4J:xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/22691390/563083839/name/GratefulDeadShabbatSvcFinal6!.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjaPB-ShCa3vwl0fOrQ_52Par1TyX7sWwLWwdpCpE5P2MGqR7s7rI7x3J-47uyTXCdtJvoAr3LyJsMmNGAwkvxddB7gkais09zdkt8sgEin8I5oCW8eY-5VVuQTyGwjfX3UZuJg&sig=AHIEtbTOIQjaBKrO0l172fC7TjDEiSh69g">Google Doc</a>) that included Grateful Dead songs, traditional Psalms and meditative readings based on the Grateful Dead's more mystical lyrics. In this photo, the traditional prayer for mourning is coupled with the Grateful Dead song "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/tlay.html">To Lay Me Down</a>." Read more about the <a href="http://www.beingjewish.org/magazine/spring2001/article3.html">Mourner's Kaddish and the concept of "the grateful dead"</a> on BeingJewish.org.

  • "Our word <em>religion</em> comes from the Latin and means "to bind together." A working religion, then, might be one that binds together the many rhythms that affect us by creating techniques -- rituals -- that attempt to synchronize the three dances, the personal, the cultural and the cosmic. If the technique works, the reward is a new dimension of rhythm and time -- the sacred."<br><br> -- Mickey Hart in "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Drumming-at-Edge-Magic-Tr/dp/1888358181">Drumming at the Edge of Magic</a>"<br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • Jerry Shabbat

    Photo taken at <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah: Second Set</a>.

  • “…During the time of the prophets, there was no real formal worship service, and each person would pray in his own words. If a special prayer was needed to channel a particular level of spiritual energy, such a service could be led by one of the prophets or their disciples, who knew how to word the prayer to channel the required forces. It is for this reason that a prayer leader is called <em>Chazan</em>, from the same root as <em>Chazon</em>, meaning a prophetic vision.</p><p>When prophecy ceased, however, this was no longer possible. A formal system of worship, including all of its mystical elements, had to be formulated…”<br><br> -- Aryeh Kaplan in "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Meditation-Bible-Aryeh-Kaplan/dp/0877286175">Meditation and the Bible</a>"<br><br> Photo: In November 2009, <a href="http://etzchayim.org/">Congregation Etz Chayim</a> in Palo Alto, Calif., hosted a <a href="http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/40510/at-a-grateful-dead-shabbat-yahs-got-everything-i-need/">Grateful Dead Kabbalat Shabbat</a> service, which featured a 30-page prayer packet (<a href="https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:qlgWt4DbNM4J:xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/22691390/563083839/name/GratefulDeadShabbatSvcFinal6!.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjaPB-ShCa3vwl0fOrQ_52Par1TyX7sWwLWwdpCpE5P2MGqR7s7rI7x3J-47uyTXCdtJvoAr3LyJsMmNGAwkvxddB7gkais09zdkt8sgEin8I5oCW8eY-5VVuQTyGwjfX3UZuJg&sig=AHIEtbTOIQjaBKrO0l172fC7TjDEiSh69g">Google Doc</a>) that included Grateful Dead songs, traditional Psalms and meditative readings based on the Grateful Dead's more mystical lyrics.

  • "By reason of the voice of my sighing my bones cleave to my flesh."<br><br> -- <a href="http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt26a2.htm">Psalm 102</a><br><br><br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • “The percussion creates a rhythm that allows one to get into a meditative state, which allows prophecy to happen in Jewish thought..." <a href="http://www.relix.com/features/2012/06/05/soapbox-jews-for-jerry">Read more at Relix.com.</a><br><br> Photo: Mickey Hart at the Ogden Theater in Denver.

  • <em><strong>"<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/ripple.html">Ripple</a> in still water / When there is no pebble tossed / Nor wind to blow..."</strong></em><br><br> "...how can there be a ripple on still waters? And my sense is, that’s consciousness also, that’s having a thought. We have very busy minds full of these rippling thoughts but really it’s just coming up from really a very deep and peaceful place and if we can kind of meditate or get to a relaxed point where some of that noise can subside, you know, still waters run deep."<br><br> -- Alan Zoldan, who led a class at the first Blues for Challah Retreat on Jewish themes embedded in the lyrics of the Grateful Dead<br><br> <a href="http://www.neshamah.net/2008/04/ripple-and-adon.html">Read a commentary on "Ripple and the Adon Olam" by Rabbi Barry Leff.</a>

  • Photo taken at <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah: Second Set</a>.

  • The Priestealy Blessing

    "I have called upon Thee, O LORD, every day, I have spread forth my hands unto Thee.<br> Wilt Thou work wonders for the dead? Or shall the shades arise and give Thee thanks? Selah<br> Shall Thy mercy be declared in the grave? or Thy faithfulness in destruction?<br> Shall Thy wonders be known in the dark? and Thy righteousness in the land of forgetfulness?<br> But as for me, unto Thee, O LORD, do I cry, and in the morning doth my prayer come to meet Thee."<br><br> --<a href="http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt2688.htm">Psalm 88</a>

  • <em><strong>"Like an angel, standing in a shaft of light <br> Rising up to paradise, I know I'm gonna shine..."</strong></em><br><br> -- "<a href="http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/estimate.html">Estimated Prophet</a>," words by John Perry Barlow, music by Bob Weir<br><br> Photo: Bob Weir (L) and Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead attend the signing of 'Rocking The Cradle: Egypt 1978' at Best Buy on October 14, 2008 in New York City. (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)

  • "Wharf Rat" is "very much connected to the Jewish concept of <em>teshuva</em> -- of repentance and return: It's never too late to get started on making things right again."<br><br> -- Daniel Sieradski, who will lead a talk at <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> titled "The Forbidden Tree of Knowledge: Psychedelics & the Bible."<br><br> Photo: From the first <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised at the end of November.

  • "Jerry first challenged me to wake up and notice the higher things in life. ... Reb Shlomo picked up the ball from there and introduced me to the depths of Torah. He touched me deeply because his own struggles were so evident."<br><br> ...from Menashe Bleiweiss' essay "<a href="http://www.menashebleiweiss.com/articles/Grateful%20Yid%20and%20Grateful%20Dead.pdf">The Grateful Yid and the Grateful Dead: How Reb Shlomo Carlebach and Jerry Garcia Serenaded the Jewish Soul</a>" from the Winter '95-'96 edition of the <em>Jewish Spectator</em>.<br><br> Reb Shlomo (and his influence on people) was similarly compared to Jerry Garcia in a recent article by Shaul Magid in <em>Tablet Magazine</em>, "<a href="http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/music/115376/carlebach-broken-mirror">Carlebach's Broken Mirror</a>."

  • Blues for Challah

    Photo taken at <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah: Second Set</a>.

  • "You shall meet a band of prophets, coming from a high place with harp, drum, flute and lyre, and they will be prophesying themselves." <br><br> -- <a href="http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt08a10.htm">1 Samuel 10: 5</a> <br><br> In November 2009, <a href="http://etzchayim.org/">Congregation Etz Chayim</a> in Palo Alto, Calif., hosted a <a href="http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/40510/at-a-grateful-dead-shabbat-yahs-got-everything-i-need/">Grateful Dead Kabbalat Shabbat</a> service, which featured a 30-page prayer packet (<a href="https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:qlgWt4DbNM4J:xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/22691390/563083839/name/GratefulDeadShabbatSvcFinal6!.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjaPB-ShCa3vwl0fOrQ_52Par1TyX7sWwLWwdpCpE5P2MGqR7s7rI7x3J-47uyTXCdtJvoAr3LyJsMmNGAwkvxddB7gkais09zdkt8sgEin8I5oCW8eY-5VVuQTyGwjfX3UZuJg&sig=AHIEtbTOIQjaBKrO0l172fC7TjDEiSh69g">Google Doc</a>) that included Grateful Dead songs, traditional Psalms and meditative readings based on the Grateful Dead's more mystical lyrics

  • "The yeshiva life put you in a box and then, when I heard the Dead, it was like, break out and meet God." ...from a story on the occasion of the first <em>yahrzeit</em> (death anniversary) of Jerry Garcia, as observed in Israel. (Aug. 23, 1996, <a href="http://forward.com/"><em>Jewish Daily Forward</em></a>, unavailable online)

  • "I think Judaism is really hip about being in the moment. We have the Shabbat every week to refocus what the holiness of time is. What it means. To not think about the next step. Not to think about the step from before, but to experience the now -- the moment. And improvising is a little bit like that in the sense that … well, improvising is sort of like in that in the sense that you’re responding right now -- you’re experiencing what you can do right here, right now. You do take some time to think about where else you can go, I guess, but once you’re actually improvising, things just sort of flow and just happen, and you’re responding to the very now. Maybe. For sure, for sure, it’s not to get to the last note of the song. And that’s very Jewish -- to learn how to, or to sanctify each moment for what it is. And that’s what Shabbat teaches us." <br><br> -- Yaakov Dov Miller, who will lead a jam session and discussion about the Dead at the <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat <br><br> Photo: In November 2009, <a href="http://etzchayim.org/">Congregation Etz Chayim</a> in Palo Alto, Calif., hosted a <a href="http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/40510/at-a-grateful-dead-shabbat-yahs-got-everything-i-need/">Grateful Dead Kabbalat Shabbat</a> service, which featured a 30-page prayer packet (<a href="https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:qlgWt4DbNM4J:xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/22691390/563083839/name/GratefulDeadShabbatSvcFinal6!.pdf+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjaPB-ShCa3vwl0fOrQ_52Par1TyX7sWwLWwdpCpE5P2MGqR7s7rI7x3J-47uyTXCdtJvoAr3LyJsMmNGAwkvxddB7gkais09zdkt8sgEin8I5oCW8eY-5VVuQTyGwjfX3UZuJg&sig=AHIEtbTOIQjaBKrO0l172fC7TjDEiSh69g">Google Doc</a>) that included Grateful Dead songs, traditional Psalms and meditative readings based on the Grateful Dead's more mystical lyrics

  • Thou didst turn for me my mourning into dancing;<br> Thou didst loose my sackcloth, and gird me with gladness;<br> So that my glory may sing praise to Thee, and not be silent; <br> O Lord my God, I will give thanks unto Thee for ever. <br> <br><br> -- <a href="http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt2630.htm">Psalm 30</a><br><br> Photo taken at the first-ever <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised this year.

  • Bill Graham, Halloween, 1987, Lunt Fontanne Theater, NYC

    "There is a silent minority ... of otherwise unobjectionable aesthetes who, as “Grateful Dead” has become a historical record, rather than a living creative enterprise, have found themselves rekindling a fascination with the band’s recorded legacy. These are the tapeheads, the geeks, the throngs of workaday Phil Schaaps, who approach the band’s body of work with the intensity and the attention to detail that one might bring to birding, baseball, or the Talmud." --<a href="http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/11/26/121126fa_fact_paumgarten#ixzz2Cm9i2hQH">Nick Paumgarten in the <em>New Yorker</em></a> <br> Photo: When I was getting ready to go in and see the Jerry Garcia Band's Halloween performance at the Lunt Fontanne just off of Times Square, I saw this scene unfolding outside of the box office. Bill Graham was in a kind of Road Warrior costume and he was being very clear about something to the young man to the right. It probably involved explaining that no audio recorders would be allowed in the show. The followers of The Grateful Dead were usually permitted to tape the shows. But Jerry Garcia Band shows were different because there were other artists involved. And this show was eventually put on CD and sold too. Without a doubt, the recording ban was strictly enforced. As I was walking into the lobby, there was a man standing by the doors with a very loud bull horn. He was repeating, over and over, loud and clear, that if you were caught with an audio recorder, you would be thrown out of the show. So, after I sat down at my seat, I look behind me and someone is setting up a very expensive looking portable recorder. I did manage to bring my camera in, but I don't remember if that was hard or not. But I asked the guy behind me with the recorder if I could give him my address and phone number and I would love to give him some photos if I could get a tape of the show. And he nodded OK, and I proceeded to write down my info. When I turned around, his seat was empty. I never saw him again.

  • Poster from the first <a href="http://isabellafreedman.org/gratefuldead">Blues for Challah</a> retreat, which is being reprised at the end of November.<br><br> Read another story related to the phenomenon on Aish.com: "<a href="http://www.aish.com/h/sh/t/48956936.html">Shavuot and the Grateful Dead</a>"

  • Jewish Deadheads

  • My Tallis Bag

    <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Harvey_Milstein"><img style="float:left;padding-right:6px !important;" src="http://graph.facebook.com/642589636/picture?type=square" /></a><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/social/Harvey_Milstein">Harvey Milstein</a>:<br />Yes, This is my Tallis Bag....

  • From the <a href="http://www.facebook.com/jewsforjerry">Jews for Jerry Facebook group</a>. Follow them on <a href="https://twitter.com/jewsforjerry">Twitter</a>. Order pins at <a href="http://www.jewsforjerry.info/">JewsForJerry.info</a>. (Interesting side note: This is Anne Coulter's favorite Grateful Dead button. <a href="http://www.jambands.com/features/2006/06/23/deadheads-are-what-liberals-claim-to-be-but-aren-t-an-interview-with-ann-coulter">She's a Deadhead</a>, but not Jewish.)

  • The Travelling Jewish Wedding

    <a href="http://www.folkways.si.edu/the-golden-gate-gypsy-orchestra/the-travelling-jewish-wedding/judaica-world/music/album/smithsonian">From Smithsonian Folkways</a>: "The Golden Gate Gypsy Orchestra of America and California was an itinerant band of engineers, doctors, teachers, and musicians who played their music at weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and other celebrations. Formed in 1976 by friends who shared a love of Yiddish, Russian, and Rom (Gypsy) music, the band was among the first of its kind to blossom in California..."<br><br> Mickey Hart produced the album. Visit his site for more info, including an <a href="http://mickeyhart.net/discography/traveling-jewish-wedding/">oral history of the band</a>.

  • Traditional Jewish Jam

    Ta Shma Orchestra plays "traditional Jewish jam" music. Check out their <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/TaShmaOrchestra?feature=watch">videos on YouTube</a>. Also, visit <a href="http://www.tashmaorchestra.com/">their website</a> to learn more.

  • More Jewish Jam

    Ta Shma Orchestra plays "traditional Jewish jam" music. Check out their <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/TaShmaOrchestra?feature=watch">videos on YouTube</a>. Also, visit <a href="http://www.tashmaorchestra.com/">their website</a> to learn more.

  • Three Hasidim play Shakedown Street by the Grateful Dead in Mahane Yehuda in Jerusalem, Israel.

  • Holy Holy Holy