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Poster Collection Seized By Nazis To Be Sold

Peter Sachs

11/06/12 09:07 AM ET EST  AP

BERLIN -- An American Jewish man whose father's extensive collection of unique posters was seized by the Nazis and only returned after years of legal battles is looking for a buyer.

Attorney Gary Osen, who represented Peter Sachs in his fight to get back the collection of some 4,000 posters from the German Historical Museum, said Tuesday his client hopes to find a buyer for the majority of the collection. He also plans to donate some 800 to museums and universities.

Osen says if a single buyer cannot be found, the posters will be sold at auction.

A German court awarded the collection of posters, which include advertisement and propaganda dating back to the late 19th century and worth (EURO)4.5 million to (EURO)16 million ($5.75 million to $20.44 million), in March.

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  • Hans Sachs' posters

    Hans Sachs began collecting posters in his school days in the late 19th century. His collection of more than 4,300 pre- World War II posters was seized by the Nazis in 1938, and when Gestapo officers carted it off, they told Sachs that the Propaganda Minister wanted his posters for a new museum wing dedicated to “business” art. Sachs was arrested on Nov. 9, 1938 and sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp. His wife’s efforts got him freed, and together with Peter, then 14 months old, they fled to the U.S.

  • Hans Sachs' posters

    Hans Sachs began collecting posters in his school days in the late 19th century. His collection of more than 4,300 pre- World War II posters was seized by the Nazis in 1938, and when Gestapo officers carted it off, they told Sachs that the Propaganda Minister wanted his posters for a new museum wing dedicated to “business” art. Sachs was arrested on Nov. 9, 1938 and sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp. His wife’s efforts got him freed, and together with Peter, then 14 months old, they fled to the U.S.

  • Hans Sachs' poster

    Hans Sachs began collecting posters in his school days in the late 19th century. His collection of more than 4,300 pre- World War II posters was seized by the Nazis in 1938, and when Gestapo officers carted it off, they told Sachs that the Propaganda Minister wanted his posters for a new museum wing dedicated to “business” art. Sachs was arrested on Nov. 9, 1938 and sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp. His wife’s efforts got him freed, and together with Peter, then 14 months old, they fled to the U.S.

  • Peter Sachs, son of pre-war poster collector Hans Sachs, reacts under one of the posters in his father's collection inside the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, January 23, 2007. Sachs was visiting Berlin for the first time since 1938, fighting to win back posters he is claiming belong in his family, seized from his father during Kristallnacht, some of which are now on display and in the archives of the museum. This was the younger Sachs' first time seeing the actual posters in person.

  • In this May 16, 2006 file photo Peter Sachs holds up a book with some of his father, Hans Sachs' favorite posters at his home in Sarasota, Fla. Collecting poster art was Hans Sachs' passion. Germany's top court is set to rule Friday, March 16, 2012 on whether a Berlin museum must return to Sachs thousands of rare posters that were seized by the Nazis from his father. Lower courts have ruled that Peter Sachs is the rightful owner of the vast collection of advertisements and political propaganda dating back to the late 1800s, and now believed to be worth between euro 4.5 million to euro16 million (US$6 million to US$21 million), depending on their condition.(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

  • In this Jan. 23, 2007 file photo a poster from Hans Sachs' Poster Collection is exhibited at the German Historical Museum in Berlin, Germany. Germany's top court is set to rule Friday, March 16, 2012 on whether the Berlin museum must return to Hans Sachs' son Peter Sachs from Florida thousands of rare posters that were seized by the Nazis from him. Lower courts have ruled that Peter Sachs is the rightful owner of the vast collection of advertisements and political propaganda dating back to the late 1800s, and now believed to be worth between euro 4.5 million to euro16 million (US$6 million to US$21 million), depending on their condition. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber, File)

  • This undated image provided by Peter Sachs, shows a poster done by P.H. Mar, circa 1932, part of a collection of some thousands of rare posters believed to be worth between 4.5 euro million and 16 million euro (US $6 million and US $21 million), which must be returned to Peter Sachs, a Jewish man now living in U.S.A.. Germany's top federal appeals court ruled Friday March 16, 2012, that the German Historical Museum in Berlin must return the posters to the rightful owner because they were seized by the Nazi Gestapo, and that for the institution to keep them would be perpetuating the crimes of the Nazis. Words read: Third Reich? - No! (AP Photo/Photo Courtesy of Peter Sachs)

  • Peter Sachs, son of pre-war poster collector Hans Sachs, looks at one of the posters in his father's collection inside the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, January 23, 2007. The propaganda poster depicts a grotesque image of a "jew" paralleled in profile with an "Aryan," framed by swastikas. Sachs was visiting Berlin for the first time since 1938, fighting to win back posters he is claiming belong in his family, seized from his father during Kristallnacht, some of which are now on display and in the archives of the museum. This was the younger Sachs' first time seeing the actual posters in person.

  • Gary Osen, lawyer for Peter Sachs, son of pre-war poster collector Hans Sachs, shows a book entitled "Hans J. Sachs: The World's Largest Poster Collection, 1896-1938 - How it came about and...disappeared from the Face of the Earth" inside the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin, Germany, Tuesday, January 23, 2007. The younger Sachs was visiting Berlin for the first time since 1938, fighting to win back posters he is claiming belong in his family, seized from his father during Kristallnacht, some of which are now on display and in the archives of the museum. This was the his first time seeing the actual posters in person.

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