With the most recent round of elections over, pundits have already pounced on the 2014 cycle. Some of the speculation has centered around actress and activist Ashley Judd, a Kentucky native who some say would be a perfect candidate to challenge Sen. Mitch McConnell in the 2014 election.

The Golden Globe-nominated actress, who is married to three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dario Franchitti, is one third of the famous Judd clan -- mother Naomi and half-sister Wynonna are country music stars.

So far, democrats in Kentucky seem to think positively of the possibility.

”If you had an Ashley Judd-McConnell race, I think it would be as high profile a race as Elizabeth Warren and Scott Brown,” said U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth (D-Ky.) said, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal.

”The money would pour in here as soon as she entered the race,” Yarmuth said.

Meanwhile, MSNBC fueled the rumors Wednesday, when commentator Chuck Todd said there was "serious speculation" about a Judd run, according to USA Today. Todd said the Senate Minority leader might be "vulnerable" after failing to re-take the Senate for the GOP on Tuesday.

Also on MSNBC, political analyst Howard Fineman said Kentucky donors are on board as well. "They want her. I know they want her," he said. "The money people in Kentucky want Ashley Judd."

In a statement reported by US Weekly, however, Judd said she's flattered by the buzz, but has not made any decision.

"I cherish Kentucky, heart and soul, and while I'm very honored by the consideration, we have just finished an election, so let's focus on coming together to keep moving America's families, and especially our kids, forward," Judd said.

McConnell's rep told the magazine the senator was a big fans of the actress.

"Senator McConnell and his wife are big fans of Ashley Judd's movies and appreciate her energy, particularly when it comes to getting young people engaged in the political process," the Senator's campaign manager, Jesse Benton, said.

Judd does not currently live in Kentucky, she lives in Tennessee, but she could move back and qualify to run there at any point, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal.

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