Marijuana doesn't help disaster victims.

Money and supplies do.

It's a simple connection made by a pot dealer in Brooklyn, N.Y., who donated half of his proceeds made over two days last week to victims of Hurricane Sandy. He spoke to HuffPost Crime on the condition of anonymity.

The dealer said he didn't care about the implications of turning drug money into supplies for victims in the Rockaways, N.Y., some of whom are still without power. He just wanted to help out, and raised $700 for the cause.

"Look, there are probably some people down there [in the Rockaways] who want some marijuana -- but that's not going to clothe and feed them," he said. "So in order for me to help, I needed to turn what I do into something concrete that I could give to them."

The college-educated weed dealer said he saw the devastation in Breezy Point -- where some 80 homes flooded and burned to the ground -- and decided it was time to make some green for the victims. He alerted his clientele last Monday that he would be donating, and the calls started coming in.

He's no Pablo Escobar, but the dealer claims he did make $1,400 in those two days, amounting to $700 that will go toward hot meals, diapers, formula, clean water and other supplies that people on the Rockaway Peninsula still desperately need. HuffPost Crime confirmed that he bought 50 wool blankets that will likely go to residents who are still without power.

"Yes, I made a little extra money for myself those two days," he told HuffPost Crime. "But [my clients] are getting something they'd already get anyway. I was going to work regardless, and now I felt like I was doing it with purpose ... I'm not doing what I do in order to get rich or create some super marijuana empire. I'm trying to help, and this is my job."

When he's not operating Nuggets for the Needy, the Brooklyn dealer says he's been throwing on boots and helping to transport relief goods -- and not the THC kind -- around south Brooklyn and Queens.

Organizations such as Lava Girl Surf and Rockaway Beach Club have erected impromptu relief centers and are literally peddling much-needed items to affected areas. More than 1,000 volunteers helped clean out homes and deliver supplies over the weekend for those two organizations alone, according to Lava Girl Surf's Facebook page.

Meanwhile, residents of the Rockaway Peninsula are still suffering, some still without electricity and many looking for answers after Sandy and a subsequent Nor'easter destroyed their homes.

For those who'd like to help out in Sandy's aftermath, there are plenty of options. People across New York and New Jersey still need supplies, and The Huffington Post has compiled a list of drop-off centers and charities for anyone who wants to assist. Click here for a (legally sound) list of charity options.

Related on HuffPost:

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  • Robert Laura Kyle Connolly, storm

    Robert Connolly, left, embraces his wife Laura as they survey the remains of the home owned by her parents that burned to the ground in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in the fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. At right is their son, Kyle. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Residents assess damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A man photographs a home damaged during a storm at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • The metal parts of a bicycle lie in the ashes of a home in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 80 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • This aerial photo shows burned-out homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough New York after a fire on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The tiny beachfront neighborhood told to evacuate before Sandy hit New York burned down as it was inundated by floodwaters, transforming a quaint corner of the Rockaways into a smoke-filled debris field. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A fire fighter surveys the smoldering ruins of a house in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • This aerial photo shows burned-out homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough New York after a fire on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The tiny beachfront neighborhood told to evacuate before Sandy hit New York burned down as it was inundated by floodwaters, transforming a quaint corner of the Rockaways into a smoke-filled debris field. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A man carries a bag of belongings as he walks in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • This aerial photo shows burned-out homes in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough New York after a fire on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The tiny beachfront neighborhood told to evacuate before Sandy hit New York burned down as it was inundated by floodwaters, transforming a quaint corner of the Rockaways into a smoke-filled debris field. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • A sign for Ocean Avenue stands in the smoldering ruins of houses in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A log rests on a vehicle damaged by superstorm Sandy at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Homes destroyed by a fire at Breezy Point are shown, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Members of the New York City Fire Department assess damage caused by a six-alarm fire at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Fire still burns at the scene of a fire in Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Kathy Jones

    Kathy Jones calls to let her family know she's ok after damage caused by flooding destroyed her home at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Damage from flooding at Breezy Point after superstorm Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the New York City borough of Queens.The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Firefighters approach Breezy Point to battle a blaze on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A fire burns at least two dozen homes in a flooded neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Stephanie Keith)

  • A fire burns at least two dozen homes in a flooded neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Stephanie Keith)

  • Hurricane Sandy Bears Down On U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastline

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 30: Homes sit smoldering after Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in the Breezy Point Neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. Over 50 homes were reportedly destroyed in a fire during the storm. At least 40 people were reportedly killed in the U.S. by Sandy as millions of people in the eastern United States have awoken to widespread power outages, flooded homes and downed trees. New York City was hit especially hard with wide spread power outages and significant flooding in parts of the city. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

  • Hurricane Sandy Bears Down On U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastline

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 30: A pole sits on the hood of a SUV on October 30, 2012 in the Breezy Point Neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. At least 40 people were reportedly killed in the U.S. by Sandy as millions of people in the eastern United States have awoken to widespread power outages, flooded homes and downed trees. New York City was hit especially hard with wide spread power outages and significant flooding in parts of the city. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    People affected by flooding and fire from Hurricane Sandy get a ride in a New York City Police Department truck on October 30, 2012 in the Breezy Point area of Queens in New York. The death toll from superstorm Sandy has risen to 35 in the United States and Canada, and was expected to climb further as several people remained missing, officials said. Officials in the states of Connecticut, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia all reported deaths from the massive storm system, while Toronto police said a Canadian woman was killed by flying debris. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)