Huffpost Taste

Thanksgiving Recipes And Tips From Our Tastemakers

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Hungry

Thanksgiving is here, and while there are plenty of hotlines to help frightened home cooks, we're pretty keen on enlisting the advice of our favorite professional chefs. Enter, Tastemakers: we've got some of the greatest minds in food on the case. Check out the latest in our live blog below.

Read the complete list of Tastemakers here

live blog

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When you source locally, meat looks this beautiful. From the kitchen of Craig Deihl at Cypress in Charleston, SC.

@ cdeihl : Pineywoods veal. Southern Heritage meat from LJ Woods Farm http://t.co/5PX41m2W

veal

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This would probably feed our HuffPost Taste team of 4. Maybe. From the kitchen of Alain Allegretti:

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Introducing our newest Tastemakers!

Joe Clarke and Darlene Mann-Clarke: A husband-wife team who run American Grocery Restaurant in Greenville, SC. Joe runs the kitchen with an approach to food based on fresh ingredients from a network of local farmers, and Darlene runs the restaurant's wine program.

And they're starting with a bang -- with FRIED deviled eggs, which is basically HuffPost Taste's dream hors d'oeuvre. Read below to see how they make them:

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From the kitchen of Bistro La Promenade:

@ AlainAllegretti : Butternut squash on the line butter and salt at the ready #tastemakers http://t.co/BlguxvIf

butternut squash

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The finishing touch of a gorgeous salad at Alain Allegretti's Bistro La Promenade:

@ AlainAllegretti : For our duck prosciutto, kale and red cabbage salad. One of my favorite ingredients http://t.co/Ecrxz4Zg

pomegranate

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From Yotam Ottolenghi's London kitchen:

@ ottolenghi : Camden: it's bone-freezin cold so we made turkey balls in apples, prunes, potato, courgette. #tastemakers http://t.co/qlaLgy6T

turkey balls

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Introducing our newest Tastemaker, Craig Deihl! The two-time James Beard-nominated chef leads the team at Cypress (Charleston, SC) using Lowcountry ingredients to reinvent classics as well as prepare dynamic and innovative dishes showcasing his signature style.

Check out what he's got cooking right now:

"Holiday ham"

holiday hams

"50 day dry aged rib. Salami mold grafts to it. Amazing flavor."

dry aged rib

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From the kitchen of Joe Campanale's Dell'Anima, a brilliant use for your Parmigiano rinds. Next time you're braising some short ribs, try wedging a few rinds in between.

@ joecampanale : Chef Andrew getting ready to braise short ribs with parmigiano rinds @dellanimaNYC #tastemakers http://t.co/NijOQRpq

ribs

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A shot of the cold storage at Bistro La Promenade today. Don't you wish your refrigerator looked so good? (And so big?)

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Who needs men when you can have pigs? From the kitchen of Yotam Ottolenghi, we present a great use for your creatively shaped cookie cutters:

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Joe Campanale has a great tip for picking out your Satsumas: judge a book by its (ugly) cover.

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Check out what Linton Hopkins has baking at H&F Bread Company in Atlanta, GA.

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From the kitchen of Alain Allegretti at Bistro La Promenade, the secret ingredient to sweeten tonight's soup:

@ AlainAllegretti : My fantastic #souschef Greg preparing our squash and corn soup special for tonight. With apples of course http://t.co/dojJ0JyO

apples

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From the kitchen of Yotam Ottolenghi:

@ ottolenghi : Camden news: all set for less than conservative bubble and squeak. http://t.co/ds4xinVb

bubble

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grinder

If Steven Rinella approves of this meat grinder, we can pretty much guarantee that every meat lover in your life will also approve.

From his latest blog post:

In my mind, paying someone to process your wild game is about as fun as paying someone to hunt for you. I’ve handled my own game for my entire life, beginning when I helped my dad and grandfather chop up whitetails in our garage in Michigan. Back then we used a temperamental hand grinder that would gag up on the slightest bit of sinew, which was frustrating to the extreme. Things have come a long ways since then, both for me and my meat grinder. Nowadays I’m using a Weston commercial-grade grinder (#12) that can whiz through the toughest cut of venison without even changing tune. I’m serious, this grinder has completely changed the task of home processing. Properly-chilled meat goes through at about 6 lbs. a minute—which, in case you don’t know, is really, really fast. Anyone who likes to process wild game, or who wants to get into it, is going to use the hell out of one of these. Be a Christmas hero and buy one for your favorite hunter.

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Chef Alain Allegretti's team makes a lamb Christmas tree, of sorts, at Bistro La Promenade in New York:

lambtree

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Chocolate master Francois Payard's secret for making the best tea-infused chocolates:

If you want to taste Payard's tea-infused chocolates for yourself, they're in this gift box that can be purchased online -- give them a try!

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And the secret ingredient Yotam Ottolenghi uses at his Camden location is:

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A look at the storefront of Yotam Ottolenghi's shop in London.

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@ AlainAllegretti : Squid for the seafood risotto. Beautiful colors http://t.co/eMYMwt52

squid

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From start to finish, watch as Steven Rinella makes 20 pounds of wild game bratwurst! Check out the photos below.

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From Steve Rinella:

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@nicoleariss asks Christina Tosi: What's your go-to holiday recipe? Tosi's response is brilliant:

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This is what staff lunch looks like if you're lucky enough to work at Ottolenghi in London.

@ ottolenghi : Camden news: no recipe testing today, just staff lunch. http://t.co/q0z20chV

stafflunch

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A little inspiration from Alain Allegretti's Bistro La Promenade tonight:

@ AlainAllegretti : Cocktail of the evening: velvet smoke. rum, blended scotch, almond orgeat http://t.co/I160MSlA

cocktail

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Hot off the line at chef Linton Hopkins' Atlanta gastropub, Holeman & Finch. Read below the photo for the special story behind the burgers.

From holeman-finch.com:

Around 9:00 each night at Holeman & Finch Public House, the energy shifts from the constant mirth that seems to shroud this establishment to a sort of jubilant tension. More folks start streaming into the place and by 9:50, it’s full—teeming with those eager for the stroke of ten o’clock followed by the squawk of a portable bullhorn announcing, “it’s burger time!”

Each night, 24 exquisite, double patty cheeseburgers are assembled on house-made buns and served alongside hand-cut fries and homemade ketchup, mustard and pickles—only 24. Some nights they sell out in under a minute.

The thought behind the minimal number and the 10:00 serving is not a gimmick; it’s just the opposite. A handcrafted burger takes a lot of time to prepare correctly.

In order to pay the proper respect to this iconic American food, Linton Hopkins and company decided that only a handful would be made and served each night. This way, the burger is done right; and because generally, a burger on any menu tends to trump other items, it allows the rest of Holeman and Finch’s menu to take its place with due respect.

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From London-based chef Yotam Ottolenghi, author of our new favorite cookbook Jerusalem:

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What's happening now in the kitchen of Bistro La Promenade:

mushrooms

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