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'Evolution Of Life On Earth' VIDEO: 4.5-Billion-Year History Compressed Into Two Minutes

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When the amazing 4.5-billion-year history of life on Earth is compressed into two minutes and 20 seconds, it quickly becomes apparent that humans are the new kids on the block.

The new "Evolution of Life on Earth" video starts with the planet's first single-celled organisms and goes all the way to the evolution of modern-day humans. The whole story is told as if all those years were compressed into a single 24-hour day. And guess what: humans don't show up until 11:58 p.m.

No, that was not a typo: 11:58 p.m.

"All of the recorded human history fits within a few seconds," narrator Mitchell Moffit says in the video, which was made by AsapSCIENCE, the online video team that brought us "The Science of Orgasms."

"We thought it would be most effective/interesting to have a grand vision that follows the path towards humanity," Moffit, a co-creator of AsapSCIENCE, told The Huffington Post in an email. "Makes you feel somewhat insignificant, but also showcases the beauty and awesomeness of life."

Moffit wrote that this new video was inspired by an excerpt from the book "A Short History of Nearly Everything" by writer Bill Bryson. From there, Moffit and co-creator Gregory Brown took the idea to YouTube.

Watch "The Evolution of Life on Earth" above.

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