Apparently in China, affection comes with a price.

A Chinese kindergarten has begun charging parents about $13 a month for their kids to receive daily hugs from teachers, according to RT.com.

The alleged “hug fee” of 80 yuan, or about $12.80, covers one hug in the morning and one hug at the end of the day. A Chinese blogger first wrote about the fee after discovering a friend's child had been charged by the Shangmao Kindergarten, located east of Yangzhou City.

According to the Digital Journal, parents had no idea that they were actually paying for their children to get hugged, as schools were disguising the charge as a "quality education fee.”

The fee is under investigation by the local school board, according to RT.com.

While some schools in China may be taking extra steps to ensure that students are hugged, other schools in the U.S. are doing just the opposite. A middle school principal in North Carolina recently banned hugs sparking a “hug-in” protest by the school’s eighth graders. Another middle school student in Florida was suspended from school after hugging her best friend in between classes.

Chinese schools apparently aren't alone in looking to turn a profit on the universal sign of affection. Jackie Samuel, a New York entrepreneur, has turned hugging into a business, charging $60 an hour for a between-the-sheets snuggle fest.

A Coca-Cola vending machine in Singapore says “Hug Me” and requires customers to give the machine a hug rather than money to get a Coke.

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  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    An isolated five-floor building stands in the middle of a new road on November 22, 2012 in Wenling, Zhejiang Province of China. Zhejiang Province of China. 67-year-old Luo Baogen and his 65-year-old wife from Xiazhangyang village still live in the half-demolished residential building, because they are dissatisfied with the relocation compensation. The road, which leads to the Wenling Railway Station, has not been put into use.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    This picture taken on November 22, 2012 shows a half-demolished apartment building (L) standing in the middle of a newly-built road thanks to a Chinese couple that refused to move in Wenling, in eastern China's Zhejiang province.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    This picture taken on November 22, 2012 shows Luo Baogen pointing at his half-demolished apartment building that stands in the middle of a newly-built highway in Wenling, in eastern China's Zhejiang province. Luo Baogen, 67, and his 65-year-old wife have waged a four-year battle to receive more than the 41,300 USD compensation offered by the local government of Daxi, a Chinese newspaper said. The phenomenon is called a "nail house" in China, as such buildings stick out and are difficult to remove, like a stubborn nail.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    An isolated five-floor building stands in the middle of a new road on November 22, 2012 in Wenling, Zhejiang Province of China.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    This picture taken on November 22, 2012 shows a half-demolished apartment building standing in the middle of a newly-built road thanks to a Chinese couple that refused to move in Wenling, in eastern China's Zhejiang province.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    This picture taken on November 22, 2012 shows a half-demolished apartment building standing in the middle of a newly-built road thanks to a Chinese couple that refused to move in Wenling, in eastern China's Zhejiang province.

  • Weird House In China Is In MIddle Of Street

    Luo Baogen, one of only two residents including his wife living in a half-demolished residential building, holds his collectively-owned land use certificate on November 22, 2012 in Wenling, Zhejiang Province of China.