MERIDA, Mexico — Dec. 21 started out as the prophetic day some had believed would usher in the fiery end of the world. By Friday afternoon, it had become more comic than cosmic, the punch line of countless Facebook posts and at least several dozen T-shirts.

At the ruins of the ancient Mayan city of Chichen Itza, thousands chanted, danced and otherwise frolicked around ceremonial fires and pyramids to mark the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar.

The doomsayers who had predicted apocalypse were nowhere to be seen. Instead, people showed up in T-shirts reading "The End of the World: I Was There."

Vendors eager to sell their ceramic handicrafts and wooden masks called out to passing visitors, "Buy something before the world ends."

And on Twitter, (hash)EndoftheWorld had become one of the day's most popular hash tags.

For the masses in the ruins, Dec. 21 sparked celebration of what they saw as the birth of a new and better age. It was also inspiration for massive clouds of patchouli and marijuana smoke and a chorus of conch calls at the break of dawn.

The official crowd count stood at 20,000 as of mid-afternoon, with people continuing to arrive. That surpassed the count on an average day but not as many as have gathered at the ruins during equinoxes.

The boisterous gathering Friday included Buddhists, pagan nature worshippers, druids and followers of Aztec and Maya religious traditions. Some kneeled in attitudes of prayer, some seated with arms outstretched in positions of meditation, all facing El Castillo, the massive main pyramid.

Ceremonies were being held at different sides of the pyramid, including one led by a music group that belted out American blues and reggae-inspired chants. Others involved yelping and shouting, and drumming and dance, such as one ceremony led by spiritual master Ollin Yolotzin.

"The world was never going to end, this was an invention of the mass media," said Yolotzin, who leads the Aztec ritual dance group Cuautli-balam. "It is going to be a good era. ... We are going to be better."

Ivan Gutierrez, a 37-year-old artist who lives in the nearby village, stood before the pyramid and blew a low, sonorous blast on a conch horn. "It has already arrived, we are already in it," he said of the new era. "We are in a frequency of love, we are in a new vibration."

But it was unclear how long the love would last: A security guard quickly came over and asked him to stop blowing his conch shell, enforcing the ruin site's ban on holding ceremonies without previous permits.

Similar rites greeted the new era in neighboring Guatemala, where Mayan spiritual leaders burned offerings and families danced in celebration. Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina and Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla attended an official ceremony in the department of Peten, along with thousands of revelers and artists.

At an indigenous South American summer solstice festival in Bolivia, President Evo Morales arrived on a wooden raft to lead a festival that made offerings to Pachamama, Mother Earth, on a small island in the middle of Lake Titicaca.

The leftist leader and 3,000 others, including politicians, indigenous shamans and activists of all stripes, didn't ponder the end of the world, just the death of the capitalist system, which Morales told the crowd had already happened amid "a global financial, political and moral crisis."

"The human community is in danger because of climatic reasons, which are related to the accumulation of wealth by some countries and social groups," he told the crowd. "We need to change the belief that having more is living better."

Despite all the pomp, no one is certain the period known as the Mayas' 13th Baktun officially ended Friday. Some think it may have happened at midnight. Others looked to Friday's dawn here in the Maya heartland. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History even suggested historical calculations to synchronize the Mayan and Western calendars might be off a few days. It said the Mayan Long Count calendar cycle might not really end until Sunday.

One thing, however, became clear to many by Friday afternoon: The world had not ended.

John Hoopes, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Kansas, was at the ruins, using the opportunity to talk about how myths are created.

"You don't have to go to the far corners of the earth to look for exotic things, you've got them right here," he noted.

End-of-the-world paranoia, however, has spread globally despite the insistence of archeologists and the Maya themselves that the date meant no such thing.

Dozens of schools in Michigan canceled classes this week amid rumors of violence tied to the date. In France, people expecting doomsday were looking expectantly to a mountain in the Pyrenees where they believe a hidden spaceship was waiting to spirit them away. And in China, government authorities were cracking down on a fringe Christian group spreading rumors about the world's end, while preaching that Jesus had reappeared as a woman in central China.

Gabriel Romero, a Los Angeles-based spiritualist who uses crystal skulls in his ceremonies, had no such illusions as he greeted the dawn at Chichen Itza.

"We'll still have to pay taxes next year," he said.

As if to put the final nail in the coffin of such rumors, Bob McMillan of the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory confirmed Friday that no large asteroids are predicted to hit anytime soon.

And Bill Leith, a senior science adviser at the U.S. Geological Survey, noted that as far as quakes, tsunamis and solar storms for the rest of the day, "we don't have any evidence that anything is imminent."

Still, there were some who wouldn't truly feel safe until the sun sets Friday over the pyramids in the Yucatan peninsula, the heartland of the Maya.

Mexico's best-known seer, Antonio Vazquez Alba, known as "El Brujo Mayor," said he had received emails with rumors that a mass suicide might be planned in Argentina. He said he was sure that human nature represented the only threat Friday.

"Nature isn't going to do us any harm, but we can do damage to ourselves," he said.

Authorities worried about overcrowding and possible stampedes during celebrations Friday at Mayan sites such as Chichen Itza and Uxmal, both about 1 1/2 hours from Merida, the Yucatan state capital. Special police and guard details were assigned to the pyramids.

Yucatan Gov. Rolando Zapata said he for one felt the growing good vibes, and not just because his state was raking in loads of revenue from the thousands of celebrants flooding in.

"We believe that the beginning of a new baktun means the beginning of a new era, and we're receiving it with great optimism," Zapata said.

___

Associated Press writers Romina Ruiz-Goiriena in Iximche, Guatemala; Bradley Brooks in Sao Paulo; Carlos Valdez in Isla del Sol, Bolivia; and Florent Bajrami in Bugarach, France, contributed to this report.

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Since the world hasn't ended, we're going to conclude the live blog at this time. Thank you all for reading!

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@ jonesry28 : Well... We survived the "misinterpretation of the Mayan calendar." Congratulations to all of you.

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@ KeithCowing : I guess mayan calendars will be half price at bookstores starting tomorrow

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mayan calendar doomsday

For his latest cartoon, Chicano artist Lalo Alcaraz depicted what the Maya's real doomsday vision might have been.

Read more about Alcaraz on HuffPost Latino Voices.

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mayan apocalypse

The temptation to ignore the signs, jump the ropes and climb the pyramid dominating the main plaza here gets the better of some visitors. That's why the archeological park has called in Yucatan's scouts, who stand at something approaching attention around the major ruins.

"We do this for special events," explains Gabriel Ancona, an 18-year old Rover Scout -- Mexico's equivalent to an Eagle Scout -- from nearby Merida. "I enjoy serving and, even though I'm not Maya, this is part of my culture because I grew up here."

Ancona says several of his friends had to help stop a crowd of 80 spiritualists, mostly American, who tried to climb El Castillo this morning.

"The scouts were definitely helpful with that," says Ancona, who is amused but unfazed by visitors' fervor.

He admits he finds some of the dancing funny but is complacent about the whole thing.

"They can believe whatever they want," he says. "They just have to stay off the ruins."

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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From zombies to a viral pandemic, Hollywood has imagined countless ways the world could end. While some plots are more far-fetched than others, most apocalyptic films have one thing in common: that glimmer of hope that the world won't end after all.

Overlooking blockbuster disaster films like "The Day After Tomorrow," CNN Entertainment compiled a list of the end of the world movies you should actually watch.

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@ JoshHelfferich : Okay, so just to be clear, Nostradamus predicted Gangnam Style hitting a billion views today. http://t.co/caiviccJ

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At dawn, crowds gathered at Tikal - one of the largest pre-Columbian Maya sites in Central America - for rituals sending out the old - and bringing in the new. Reuters reports.

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mayan apocalypse

Silvia Guadalupe commutes every day from the Maya town of Xcalacop to the temple complex of Chichen Itza, where she sells handkerchiefs embroidered with bright flowers. Today, as the world fails to end, she is hoping to make enough sales to buy new clothing for her children.

"Only once we make enough money will we go home and celebrate," she says. "We are poor so we have to be here today."

She's not ashamed of her poverty and actually laughs about it. Hers is hardly a unique position within the Maya community. Still, it is a unique day.

"I think things may be a little better for the next few years," Guadalupe says, smiling at a customer who examines her goods and walks away. "It is nice that people care about our calendar, which is like a religion to many people here."

She expects to head home late tonight.

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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apocalypse art

In honor of the anti-climactic affair, HuffPost Arts compiled their 10 favorite artworks that just scream "the world is ending!"

See the rest of the apocalyptic artwork on HuffPost Arts.

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According to Mayan prophecy, Sirince, Turkey, is one of the few places that will escape the December 21st apocalypse. As thousands of Doomsday believers flock there, the town's hoping they'll spend like there's no tomorrow. WSJ's Joe Parkinson reports.

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mayan apocalypse

As clouds roll in and faint sounds of thunder join the drum circles, there is murmuring among the male attendees about this becoming "one big wet T-shirt contest."

The celebrants twirling flags or contorting themselves amid the ruins are being joined by more and more tourists as the day wears on, but the white-clad spiritualists are still the main attraction, both for the growing crowd and each other.

A man in a shamanic cape who has been hungrily watching an attractive dancer turns to his friend and says, "With all this energy, I just wish I could bang the earth."

Transcending desire to reach harmony is proving difficult.

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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Call it impeccable planning or just a funny way to mark the year’s biggest non-event – the end of the world according to the Mayan Calendar.

Calgary radio station X92.9’s playlist on Friday, which doomsday predictions pegged as the day the world would end, citing the fact that Dec. 21 is the end of the Mayan calendar, consisted of only one song, "It’s The End Of The World" by R.E.M.

Read the full story on HuffPost Canada.

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end of the world 2012

People meditate on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012.

(AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

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The sun rose on Dec. 21, and the world is still here. Though NASA assured everyone that the world would not end, this isn't the first time we've faced a potential apocalypse.

Salon looks back as far as 2800 B.C. at the "apocalypses that got away."

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In case you missed it, NASA released a video entitled "Why the World Didn't End Yesterday." But instead of waiting until Dec. 22 to upload the video, NASA released it last week. The caption explains it all:

NASA is so sure the world won't come to an end on Dec. 21, 2012, that they already released a video for the day after.

Read the full story on HuffPost Science.

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chichen itza

CHICHEN ITZA -- Dr. Nina Meyerhof may be the best credentialed spiritualist in attendance at this celebration of the renewed harmony prophesied by the Maya Calendar. The president and founder of Children of the Earth, an international NGO devoted to "pioneering consciousness," Dr. Meyerhof is also one of the Notable Luminaries of Evolutionary Leaders, a group dedicated to "conscious evolution."

"I'm here to recommit myself to being free of attachments," says Dr. Meyerhof. "There is an evolutionary process so generations to come will be more conscious and able to replace systems -- economic and educational -- that aren't working for us."

Meyerhof says today's celebration reminds her of the Harmonic Convergence in the 1980s, when she embarked on a vision quest to Mount Shasta and flew to Alexandria, Egypt.

"I am a doer so I can't just sit at home and say 'om,'" says Dr. Meyerhof, sitting in front of a small temple decorated with jaguar heads. "I have to physically plant myself in places of power and get that energy."

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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evo morales mayan apocalypse

The Mayan apocalypse, predicted to take place on Dec. 21, has arrived without so much as a sputter. But while many around the world began to shutter their arks and bunkers in wait for another doomsday, Bolivia's president was celebrating the arrival of a new era.

Evo Morales was expected to mark the auspicious day by sailing across Lake Titicaca on a huge reed boat to attend a celebration on the Island of the Sun, Desert Local News reports.

Read the full story on HuffPost World.

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mayan apocalypse

Small replicas of the Maya calendar predicting the beginning of a new age are on sale in the shadows of the Chichen Itza ruins for 80 pesos (about $6), but hawkers will discount them forty percent if tourists are looking for a bargain.

When asked if he's sold many calendars, one stall owner performs an elaborate mime bemoaning the lack of pockets in the flowing robes and skirts worn by many of the assembled.

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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NASA may have been swamped with phone calls for the past few weeks, but one NASA engineer still had time to field questions online.

When a Quora user asked why the Mayan calendar ends on Dec. 21, 2012, NASA's Robert Frost explained:

Quite simply, they ran out of space on the calendar. We run out of space on our calender every December 31st. It isn't a big deal. We just start over the next day.

The Mayan calendar is no different. It is designed to optimize space by using a series of concentric circles that act like gears. A full revolution of one circle is equivalent to a cog on the next circle.

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DENVER -- Officials in Denver want people to know this is only a test.

The city is testing new outdoor warning sirens on Friday, and they're well aware of all the talk about the Mayan calendar and time running out for the world's population.

In announcing the drill, officials said they wanted to make sure that people knew that the wailing sirens didn't mean it was the end of the world.

Read the full story on HuffPost Denver.

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Loading Slideshow...
  • Guatemala

    Mayan shamans take part in a ceremony on December 21, 2012, celebrating the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the Maya new age, at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuancan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    People meditate from the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A man meditates on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A woman meditates as she sits on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    Dancers perform as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • England

    People are silhouetted as the sun rises above the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • England

    Women soak up the sun after its rise at the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Serbia

    A car past a traffic sign saying "Rtanj" in the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    The Sun peaks over Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • England

    People embrace by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Taiwan

    Students watch during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Taiwan

    Students react during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. the Mayas' 13th Baktun would officially end on this Dec. 21. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Peru

    Peruvian shamans perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman lights cigarettes before performing a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • France

    People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • France

    Two people with her faces painted in green walk in the streets of the French southwestern village of Bugarach, on December 21, 2012, near the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendar. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    Disguised people party in front of the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendarto the dressed up as the Death walks, on December 21, 2012 in the French southwestern village of Bugarach. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: People dressed as aliens pose for the camera after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People gather in front of the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    People take part in a ceremony at the Mayan archeological site of Iximche to mark the end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, early Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. The end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun marks a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • England

    Druid leader Arthur Uther Pendragon, right, looks up as people face east to watch the sunrise by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • France

    This photo shows a view of the Pic de Bugarach mountain near the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • Pyrenean Village Of Bugarach On the D-Day Of Mayan Prophecy

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan dancer performs at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Serbia

    A man shows "Before Doomsday" application on his phone, in a Belgrade cafe, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. From Russia to California, thousands are preparing for the fateful day, when many believe a 5,125-year cycle known as the Long Count in the Mayan calendar supposedly comes to an end. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    Mayan priests pray during a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan priest lights a fire at the start of a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A tourist is seen in near a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Honduras Maya Chorti player celebrates after winning 6-5 in the Mayan ball game at Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan shaman performs a purification ritual during celebrations for the upcoming end --December 21-- of the Maya cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era, at the Kaminal Juyu site in Guatemala City, on December 18, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A Honduras´ Maya Chorti player prepares for their Mayan ball game against Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cuba

    Cubans participate in a Mayan ritual at Bacuranao beach in eastern Havana, on December 6, 2012. Mayan leaders are in Cuba delivering conferences and making ceremonies to celebrate the beginning of a new era. (ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A tourist observes a Mayan sculpture in the Copan Arqueological Park in Copan, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan priest performs a ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

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mayan apocalypse

Angela Erikson has come to Mexico to meet her maker. The owner of a chain of driving schools near Seattle, Erikson believes today will be the day the aliens who brought human DNA to Earth will return -- and she's ready to board any UFOs that touch down near the pyramid here, which she describes as an edgy tower.

"Fifty percent of me is sure this is going to happen," she says. "I've been reading about this for years, and if they come I want to go with them."

Wearing a "Take me to your leader" shirt she made last night, Erickson happily poses for pictures with curious tourists and exposes on her theory. Aliens "knocked up" the virgin Mary she explains. They are also responsible for our junk DNA.

Sarah Howard, a friend from Seattle chimes in that unexplainable DNA strands might have once "allowed us to fly or see underwater."

"I"m not sure though," Howard says. "These are theories and it's what I believe and there is logic too -- but you can never be sure."

Howard and Erickson joke that this is what separates them from the spiritualists chanting nearby with great seriousness.

The UFO fails to arrive at 11:11 a.m. as expected, but Erickson has already been looking ahead to similar astrological events that might prompt, at least, an extraterrestrial "fly by."

"I've called my mom," says Erickson. "I want to travel like I've never traveled before."

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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end of the world 2012

People react as they see the sun starting to rise on the horizon before its light hits them by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012.

(AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

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Mexico's tourism industry flourished this year as the number of visitors reached a record high, according to Bloomberg Businessweek. While tourist spending has not surpassed 2008's $13.3 billion, more than 35 million travelers arrived at airports near Mayan sites this year.

Eduardo Rivadeneyra, a public relations director for Mexican airline Asur, said the company set a new record yesterday when this year's 14 millionth passenger landed in Cancun.

“The Mayas had no idea they were giving us a marketing tool when they stopped writing their calendar," Rivadeneyra said.

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French police in the town of Bugarach have arrested two men carrying machetes and gas masks amid the town's end-of-the-world festivities. AFP writes:

Officials said they believed they were trying to test the security cordon thrown around the village and nearby mountain of Bugarach, where dozens of police were deployed to head off a potential influx of New Age fanatics and sightseers.

Read the whole story on HuffPost World.

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huffpost weird news party

Meanwhile in New York, Buck Wolf, executive editor of Crime and Weird News for the Huffington Post, organized an end of the world party at Manhattan's Hotel Chantelle on Thursday night.

Wearing a gray t-shirt with a black Maya calendar on it, Wolf said he was inspired by a similar party he had attended in 1999 related to Nostradamus's doomsday prophecies. "It's all a big scam," said Wolf. "You might as well throw a good party."

Read the full story on Reuters.

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maya apocalypse

Wordell, who goes by the nickname One Dred, came to this part of the Yucatan from his home in Sonoma for the Synthesis festival and has been listening to lectures on mankind's earthen roots and generally celebrating the harmonious new era at a local campground.

"I've been trying this new energy collection technique with this Mayan teacher I'd seen on YouTube," says Dred. "Gotta admit I've gotten pretty dizzy from all the spinning."

He says he wouldn't miss this for the world and, gesturing towards a lawn filled with chanters, meditators and women in flowing white dresses, nods approvingly.

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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Gerardo Aldana, associate professor of Chicano Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, argues that the misinterpretation of the Mayan calendar dates back to the 1960s, when archeologist Michael D. Coe published "The Maya." Coe suggested the Mayan calendar would end in 2011 or 2012, hinting, in jest, that it meant the end of the world. Scholars have since said there’s no evidence the calendar predicts an apocalyptic future.

The Mayan calendar has long astonished scholars. John Malone, author of Unsolved Mysteries of Science, regards the ancient timekeeper as the “most accurate calendar devised by any ancient culture.”

Mayans most likely used the calendar as a way to explain scientific occurrences and for kings to leave their mark, according to Simon Martin, co-curator for the “Maya 2012: Lords of Time" exhibit at the Penn Museum in Philadelphia.

Read the full story on HuffPost Latino Voices.

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maya apocalypse

As the sun begins to clear the tops of the temples at Chichen Itza, many visitors are greeting the warmth with yoga. Some, like Steven Carlino of Manhattan, have spent the last few weeks practicing in the many studios common here in the Yucatan.

"Someone asked me why didn't I just stay in Mexico for the big day," says Carlino, who teaches yoga full time and extended his trip to be here today. "There was something really activated about the place, so I decided id do that."

The song playing in the background as the assembled salute the sun? Age Of Aquarius.

-- Andrew Burmon, HuffPost Travel

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  • Guatemala

    Mayan shamans take part in a ceremony on December 21, 2012, celebrating the end of the Mayan cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the Maya new age, at the Tikal archaeological site, Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Pyramid of the Sun at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuancan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    People meditate from the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A man meditates on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    A woman meditates as she sits on the top of the Pyramid of the Sun at sunrise inside the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    Dancers perform as the sun rises at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Teotihuacan, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Many believe today is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world, while others as believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • England

    People are silhouetted as the sun rises above the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • England

    Women soak up the sun after its rise at the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Serbia

    A car past a traffic sign saying "Rtanj" in the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    The Sun peaks over Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Serbia

    People seen at the Serbian mountain of Rtanj, some 220km (140 miles) southeast of Belgrade, Serbia, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Though the Mayans never predicted outright that the world would end Friday, some New Agers are convinced that the apocalypse is indeed coming Dec. 21, 2012, the supposed end of a 5,125-year Mayan calendar. While descendants of the ancient Mayans in Mexico are facing the date with a calm conviction that life will go on, a frenzy has gripped others across the world, drawing them to several spots said to promise survival. Mayan doomsday cultists are flocking to Mount Rtanj, a pyramidal peak in Serbia, which they believe may have the power to save them on December 21.(AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • England

    People embrace by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Doomsday hour is here and so still are we. According to legend, the ancient Mayans' long-count calendar ends at midnight Thursday, ushering in the end of the world. Didn't happen. "This is not the end of the world. This is the beginning of the new world," Star Johnsen-Moser, an American seer, said at a gathering of hundreds of spiritualists at a convention center in the Yucatan city of Merida, an hour and a half from the Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Taiwan

    Students watch during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Taiwan

    Students react during the countdown to when many believe the Mayan people predicted the end of the world, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012, in Taichung, southern Taiwan. the Mayas' 13th Baktun would officially end on this Dec. 21. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • Peru

    Peruvian shamans perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman lights cigarettes before performing a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • Peru

    A Peruvian shaman perform a ritual against the alleged 2012 apocalyptic Mayan prediction in Lima, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. The supposed 5 a.m. Friday doomsday hour had already arrived in several parts of the world with no sign of the apocalypse. The social network Imgur posted photos of clocks turning midnight in the Asia-Pacific region with messages such as: "The world has not ended. Sincerely, New Zealand." (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

  • France

    People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • France

    Two people with her faces painted in green walk in the streets of the French southwestern village of Bugarach, on December 21, 2012, near the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendar. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    Disguised people party in front of the 1,231 meter high peak of Bugarach - one of the few places on Earth some believe will be spared when the world allegedly ends today according to claims regarding the ancient Mayan calendarto the dressed up as the Death walks, on December 21, 2012 in the French southwestern village of Bugarach. French authorities have pleaded with New Age fanatics, sightseers and media crews not to converge on the tiny village. AFP PHOTO / ERIC CABANIS (Photo credit should read ERIC CABANIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • France

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: People dressed as aliens pose for the camera after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People gather in front of the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    People take part in a ceremony at the Mayan archeological site of Iximche to mark the end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun in Tecpan, Guatemala, early Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. The end of the 13th Oxlajuj B'aktun marks a new period in the Mayan calendar, an event only comparable in recent times with the new millennium in 2000. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • England

    Druid leader Arthur Uther Pendragon, right, looks up as people face east to watch the sunrise by the ancient stone circle of Stonehenge, in southern England, as access to the site is given to druids, New Age followers and members of the public on the annual Winter Solstice, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

  • Mexico

    The sun rises behind the Kukulkan temple in Chichen Itza, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Ceremonial fires burned and conches sounded off as dawn broke over the steps of the main pyramid at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza Friday, making what many believe is the conclusion of a vast, 5,125-year cycle in the Mayan calendar. Some have interpreted the prophetic moment as the end of the world. The hundreds gathered in the ancient Mayan city, however, said they believed it marked the birth of a new and better age. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • France

    This photo shows a view of the Pic de Bugarach mountain near the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • People in alien costumes stand on a street in the town of Bugarach, France, Friday, Dec. 21, 2012. Although the long expected end of the Mayan calendar has come, the New Age enthusiasts have steered clear from the sleepy French town of Bugarach, which gave some locals a chance to joke about the UFO legends that surround the area. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

  • Pyrenean Village Of Bugarach On the D-Day Of Mayan Prophecy

    BUGARACH, FRANCE - DECEMBER 21: A man dressed as an alien holds up a sign after the time passed 11.11 am, the time the Mayan Apocalypse was supposed to occur in Bugarach village on December 21, 2012 in Bugarach, France. The prophecy of an ancient Mayan calendar claimed that today would see the end of the world, and that Burgarach is the only place on Earth which will be saved from the apocalypse. (Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan dancer performs at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Serbia

    A man shows "Before Doomsday" application on his phone, in a Belgrade cafe, Thursday, Dec. 20, 2012. From Russia to California, thousands are preparing for the fateful day, when many believe a 5,125-year cycle known as the Long Count in the Mayan calendar supposedly comes to an end. (AP Photo/Darko Vojinovic)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. Amid a worldwide frenzy of advertisers and new-agers preparing for a Maya apocalypse, one group is approaching Dec. 21 with calm and equanimity, the people whose ancestors supposedly made the prediction in the first place. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Guatemala

    Mayan priests pray during a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan priest lights a fire at the start of a ceremony at the Kaminal Juyu archeological site, in preparation for the Oxlajuj B'aktun, in Guatemala City Guatemala City, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo)

  • Guatemala

    A tourist is seen in near a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Honduras Maya Chorti player celebrates after winning 6-5 in the Mayan ball game at Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    A Mayan shaman performs a purification ritual during celebrations for the upcoming end --December 21-- of the Maya cycle known as Bak'tun 13 and the start of the new Maya Era, at the Kaminal Juyu site in Guatemala City, on December 18, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A Honduras´ Maya Chorti player prepares for their Mayan ball game against Guatemala´s Quirigua in Copan Ruinas, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cuba

    Cubans participate in a Mayan ritual at Bacuranao beach in eastern Havana, on December 6, 2012. Mayan leaders are in Cuba delivering conferences and making ceremonies to celebrate the beginning of a new era. (ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Honduras

    A tourist observes a Mayan sculpture in the Copan Arqueological Park in Copan, some 400 kms west of Tegucigalpa, on December 18, 2012. (ORLANDO SIERRA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guatemala

    Tourists are resting on a Mayan temple at the Tikal archaeological site in Peten departament, 560 kms north of Guatemala City, on December 19, 2012. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    Mayan dancers perform at the Xcaret Eco Theme Park on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Israel Leal)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    People take part in a Mayan ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexico

    A Mayan priest performs a ritual during the ancient Chickaban feast to honor the feathered serpent Quetzalcoatl and the storm god Kukulcan, in the site were it was placed the circular temple, at the Xoclan Archaeo-ecological Park in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico the night of November 19, 2012. (Luis PEREZ/AFP/Getty Images)