Americans for Tax Reform president Grover Norquist joined HuffPost Live Friday to explain why, despite his famous pledge for members of Congress to never raise taxes, he approves of Tuesday's deal on the fiscal cliff that raised taxes on upper-income Americans. Norquist went so far to use the word "progress" to describe the deal, which he says permanently restores 85% of the Bush tax cuts, and despite public opinion, believes that the Republican anti-tax supporters actually won this political battle.

"Talk to Robert Reich, Orzsag and the other interesting, serious Democrats," Norquist said. "They're very unhappy about what just happened. I'm happy. It ought to give you a little bit of a clue about who won Round 1 of this fight."

Norquist's satisfaction contrasts sharply with the views of several other prominent conservatives, including MSNBC's Joe Scarborough, Donald Trump, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.).

Norquist, however, notes that Republicans had little leverage going into the fiscal cliff talks, and have come out of it with significant leverage in new battles over raising the debt ceiling and averting spending cuts known as "the sequester."

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  • George Washington (1789-97)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewashington">1st President</a> of the United States (Photo by Three Lions/Getty Images)

  • Thomas Jefferson (1801-09)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/thomasjefferson">3rd President</a> of the United States (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • James Madison (1809-17)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/jamesmadison">4th President</a> of the United States (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

  • James Monroe (1817-25)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/jamesmonroe">5th President</a> of the United States (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Andrew Jackson (1829-37)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/andrewjackson">7th President </a>of the United States (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Abraham Lincoln (1861-65)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/abrahamlincoln">16th President </a>of the United States -- Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865, after being inaugurated second term. (Photo by Alexander Gardner/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) <em><strong>Correction:</strong> A previous version of this text misstated the amount of time Lincoln had served during his second term before his assassination.</em>

  • Ulysses S. Grant (1869-77)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/ulyssessgrant">18th President</a> of the United States (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Grover Cleveland (1885-89, 1893-97)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/grovercleveland22">22nd</a> and <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/grovercleveland24">24th President</a> of the United States (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

  • William McKinley (1897-1901)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/williammckinley">25th President</a> of the United States -- McKinley was elected to a second term, but it came to a tragic end when he was assassinated in September 1901. (Courtesy of the National Archives/Newsmakers)

  • Theodore Roosevelt (1901-09)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/theodoreroosevelt">26th President</a> of the United States -- After McKinley's assassination, Roosevelt completed that term and was then elected to his own term. (Photo by George C. Beresford/Beresford/Getty Images)

  • Woodrow Wilson (1913-21)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/woodrowwilson">28th President</a> of the United States (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Calvin Coolidge (1923-29)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/calvincoolidge">30th President</a> of the United States -- After President <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/warrenharding">Warren G. Harding</a> died of a heart attack in August 1923, Coolidge completed that term and then earned a term of his own. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

  • Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933-45)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/franklindroosevelt">32nd President</a> of the United States (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

  • Harry Truman (1945-53)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/harrystruman">33rd President</a> of the United States -- after <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/franklindroosevelt">FDR died</a> in April 1945 of a cerebral hemorrage, Truman completed that term, and was then elected to an additional term. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Dwight D. Eisenhower (1953-61)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/dwightdeisenhower">34th President</a> of the United States (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

  • Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-69)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/lyndonbjohnson">36th President</a> of the United States -- after John F. Kennedy's assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, then-vice president Johnson took over. He completed Kennedy's term and was then elected to one term of his own. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Richard Nixon (1969-74)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/richardnixon">37th President </a>of the United States -- Nixon was elected to a second term, but resigned in August 1974 over the Watergate scandal. (AFP/Getty Images) <em><strong>Correction:</strong> A previous version of this slide incorrectly listed Nixon as the 25th President of the United States.

  • Ronald Reagan (1981-89)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/ronaldreagan">40th President</a> of the United States (Photo credit should read -/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bill Clinton (1993-2001)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/williamjclinton">42nd President</a> of the United States (LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • George W. Bush (2001-09)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewbush">43rd President</a> of the United States (SCOTT OLSON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Barack Obama (2009-Present)

    <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/barackobama">44th President</a> of the United States (SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)