The state rested its case in the murder trial of Jodi Arias Thursday, and the defense made an immediate plea for dismissal.

Prosecutors in the Phoenix courtroom rested after brief appearances by Mesa, Ariz., police detective Esteban Flores, Sprint representative Jeff Strohn, and an acquaintance of Arias, Leslie Udy.

Flores took the stand long enough for the prosecution to play a voicemail recording of a phone call Arias placed to the detective after Travis Alexander's murder. In the message, Arias requested to speak with him about Alexander.

Arias, a 32-year-old photographer, is accused of shooting Alexander in the face, stabbing him 27 times and slitting his throat from ear to ear in the shower of his Mesa apartment on June 4, 2008. She has pleaded not guilty to murder, contending that she killed Alexander in self-defense. Prosecutors allege Arias was jealous and did not want Alexander to see other women.

After Flores stepped down, Strohn, an employee of Sprint Nextel Corp., took the stand to briefly discuss phone calls made from Arias' cell phone after Alexander's murder.

The most interesting part of the day came with the final state's witness, Leslie Udy.

A resident of Utah, Udy testified that she met Arias in September 2006 at a work-related conference in Nevada. Udy said Arias expressed concerns that Alexander was cheating on her. Later, when she met with Arias in Utah after Alexander's murder, Udy said she observed cuts on Arias' hand, which the defendant attributed to a broken glass. Udy said Arias never told her she had killed Alexander.

During cross-examination by public defender Kirk Nurmi, Udy testified that Arias was a soft-spoken, gentle person and that she had trouble believing Arias could have killed Alexander.

It was obvious during redirect that prosecutor Juan Martinez was not very pleased with Udy's testimony regarding Arias' demeanor. In an effort to demonstrate to the jury that Udy did not know Arias as well as she might think, Martinez showed Udy photos of a nude Arias posing in sexually explicit positions and asked her if she knew about that side of Arias.

Udy replied, "No."

Martinez then showed Udy a photo the prosecutor alleges was taken during the murder -- a photo he claims shows Alexander in a pool of blood near Arias' leg. He asked Udy if she was familiar with the pants Arias was allegedly wearing in the photo.

Udy replied, "No."

Martinez then announced that the state was resting its case.

The prosecution testimony lasted less than an hour on day nine of Arias' murder trial.

JODI ARIAS TRIAL PHOTOS: (Article Continues Below)

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  • Samantha Alexander

    Travis Alexander's sister, Samantha, read her emotional victim impact statement during the penalty phase of Jodi Arias' trial. Samantha Alexander spoke of the brutality of the killing and the pain of seeing the crime scene photos that were shown in court during Arias' 19 week trial. "I am a police officer and some of these photos are more gruesome than any I have ever seen in my 11 years of law enforcement," she said, as friends and family quietly cried in the courtroom. "Our minds are permanently stained with images of our poor brother's throat slit from ear to ear. Our minds are stained with images of Travis' body." Samantha Alexander added, "To have Travis taken so barbarically is beyond any words we can find to describe our loss."

  • Steven Alexander

    Travis Alexander's brother, Steven Alexander, stood in open court during the penalty phase and read his victim impact statement. "I cannot sleep alone in the dark anymore. I've had dreams of my brother all curled up in the shower -- thrown in there to rot for days ... Now when I want to talk or see my brother ... I have to go to a hole in the ground," Steven Alexander said. "I don't want these nightmares anymore," he said. "I don't want to see my brother's murderer anymore." Travis Alexander's younger brother read from a blog post he had <a href="http://travisalexander.blogspot.com/" target="_hplink">posted online</a> in April 2008 –- less than two months before he was brutally murdered. The blog post read, in part: "This is the year that will eclipse all others. I will earn more, learn more, travel more, serve more, love more, give more and be more than all the other years of my life combined … This year will be the best year of my life." "Travis Alexander was my big brother,” Steven Alexander told the jury. "He was killed ... How much did he suffer. How much did he scream?"

  • Jill Hayes

    Sur-sur-rebuttal witness, psychologist Jill Hayes, testified on behalf of the prosecution. Hayes said she disagrees with the defense experts assessment that Arias lies would not have affected her test results. Hayes said she would be very concerned about the validity of the test if someone was lying to the extent Arias was at the time they took it.

  • Robert Geffner

    Sur-rebuttal witness, psychologist Robert Geffner, was called to the stand by defense attorney Jennifer Willmott. Geffner said he reviewed materials that were provided to him by the defense, including the results of an MMPI psychological test. Those test results, Geffner said, are consistent with someone who was traumatized or in an abusive relationship. "Based on just these objective tests, what kind of working hypothesis would you be looking at?" Willmott asked. "I would be looking at anxiety disorder, PTSD and trying to find out what potential traumas may have occurred either currently or in the past. What types of things are going on that would produce those kinds of symptoms and try to define and get more clarification on what these are related to," Geffner said. Geffner said he has not diagnosed Jodi Arias with any disorders and is basing his opinion on her test results. "I focused on the records ... that was my role," he said. "I tried to explain those records. I've not evaluated her, I've not met her, I've not reviewed her case, I've not seen the testimony, I don't know the interviews of her by others, I haven't met with her myself." Willmott asked Geffner if it should matter that Arias had lied about killing Alexander at the time she took the test resulting in her PTSD diagnosis. At the time of the test, Arias was claiming two intruders had killed Alexander. "If a person says they were attacked by a tiger but in reality they were attacked by a bear -- either way, they're telling you that they've suffered trauma. Is it going to matter one way or another?" Willmott asked. "No, not for this test or for a diagnosis of PTSD. It's the reaction to the event that is assessed and goes into the diagnosis along as there is some type of traumatic event. The diagnosis requires there to be a traumatic event it doesn't require what it is. So either one of those would qualify but the test is focusing on the reaction to it," Geffner said. Willmott asked Geffner about his expertise in neuropsychology and whether he agreed with the report by the medical examiner that Travis Alexander would have been incapacitated moments after he was shot. "A bullet that goes through -- even if it did go through the frontal area here and out the other side, it would likely cause some things happening but nothing in that part of the brain would incapacitate a person. That's not the area of the brain that does that. So there's no evidence from the report that that would cause that affect unless something else happened that we don't know about," said Geffner. During cross-examination, prosecutor Juan Martinez pointed out that Geffner was basing his opinion solely on medical examiner's report. "You're telling us that your opinion, as a neuropsychologist, is based on the reading of a report?" Martinez asked. "And my knowledge of the brain," Geffner replied. "And your knowledge of the brain ... if you really wanted more explanation, as to this particular issue, you would go to an expert yourself, wouldn't you?" Martinez asked. "Yes sir," Geffner replied.

  • Robert Brown

    Robert Brown, a detective for the Mesa, Arizona Police Department’s forensic computer division, was called as a rebuttal witness by prosecutor Juan Martinez. Brown testified he examined Jodi Arias’ cellphone and found several photos that had been taken on June 3, 2008, one day before Arias’ ex-boyfriend, Travis Alexander, was killed. The photos, which were shown to the jury, show Arias with brown hair. Earlier in the trial, a California rental car agent testified Arias had blonde hair when she came to his agency and rented a vehicle for her road trip to Arizona.

  • Deanna Reid

    Travis Alexander's ex-girlfriend, Deanna Reid, was put through pointed and embarrassing questions by lawyers for the woman accused of killing him, Jodi Arias. Defense Attorney Kirk Nurmi wasted little time during his cross-examination of Reid –- a rebuttal witness called by the prosecution -– in turning the attention of the court to her relationship with Alexander. Reid, a teacher and active member of the Mormon Church, testified that she began dating Alexander in 2000 -- years before Alexander and Arias met. Soon afterward, Reid said she went on a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints mission to Costa Rica and the two split up, but reconciled in 2002. Reid said they dated exclusively from 2002 to 2005, when Reid broke up with Alexander because she was interested in marriage and he was not yet ready. She said they remained friends after the split. Nurmi pressed Reid about intimate details of her relationship with Alexander, forcing her to admit she had sex with him several times. She said both later confessed their indiscretions to church bishops. "That was our private business," Reid said when Nurmi asked if she had discussed the sexual relationship with other people. Nurmi then asked Reid a series of further embarrassing questions about Alexander. "Did he ever use phrases with you like, 'You're the ultimate slut in bed?'" Nurmi asked. "No," Reid replied. "Did he talk to you about blowing enormous loads every time?" Nurmi asked. "No," Reid replied. Alexander had once sent a text message to Arias that said, "U puts me on another planet. You are the ultimate slut in bed. No wonder I blow enormous loads every time." Nurmi continued asking questions that made Reid noticeably uncomfortable on the witness stand, evoking raunchy exchanges between Alexander and Arias that have already been described to the jury. "Did he ever ejaculate on your face?" Nurmi asked. "No," Reid replied. "Did he ever call you a whore ... a slut ... a three-hole wonder?" asked Nurmi. "No," she replied. Nurmi then referred to a recorded sex talk session between Alexander and Arias, previously played in court. On the recording, Alexander tells Arias he wants to tie her to a tree and have sex with her. "Did he ever tell you how he wanted to tie you to a tree and quote, 'put it in your ass?'" Nurmi asked. "No," Reid said. You two "must have had a different relationship than he did with Ms. Arias, correct?" Nurmi asked. Reid never got a chance to answer. Prosecutor Juan Martinez objected, citing a "lack of foundation," and Judge Sherry Stephens sustained it. Nurmi plunged ahead with more sexually explicit questions. "Did he ever tell you that the way you moan is like a 12-year-old girl having her first orgasm?" asked Nurmi. "No," Reid replied. "Did he ever tell you about wanting to cork the pot of a little girl?" Nurmi asked. "No," Reid repeated. Martinez focused his questions on whether Alexander ever abused Reid. "Would he ever call you names?" Martinez asked. "No, he did not," Reid replied. "Did he ever strike you or physically advance on you or inflict any physical violence on you?" Martinez asked. "No, never," said Reid.

  • Janeen DeMarte

    Arizona clinical psychologist Janeen DeMarte testified she conducted an evaluation of Jodi Arias and diagnosed Arias with borderline personality disorder. She also testified she found no evidence to believe Arias' claims about her memory problems or that she was a victim of domestic violence and suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • Alyce LaViolette

    Domestic violence expert Alyce LaViolette testified Jodi Arias was emotionally and physically battered and afraid for her life when she killed Travis Alexander.

  • Richard Samuels

    Defense expert Richard Samuels testified at Jodi Arias’ trial about her mental state before and after the June 2008 shooting, stabbing and slashing of Travis Alexander. Samuels said he met with Arias 12 times after her arrest and reviewed her murder case file and psychological test results. Arias was afflicted with acute stress disorder when she shot Alexander twice, stabbed him almost 30 times and cut his throat from ear to ear, Samuels testified. That disorder developed into post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, he said.

  • Lonnie Dworkin

    Lonnie Dworkin, a computer forensic examiner, was called to the stand. He highlighted YouTube activity that occurred on a computer recovered from Alexander's home.

  • Daniel Freeman

    Travis Alexander's friend, Daniel Freeman.

  • Desiree Freeman

    Desiree Freeman is the sister of Travis Alexander's friend, Daniel Freeman.

  • Lisa Andrews Diadoni

    An ex girlfriend of Travis Alexander, Lisa Andrews Diadoni, discussed the couples relationship and how she was treated by Alexander.

  • Darryl Brewer

    Darryl Brewer, a 52-year-old divorcee with a 14-year-old son testified he met Arias in the fall of 2001 and they fell in love. Brewer said they were together for about four years. <em>Brewer requested his face not be show.</em>

  • Gus Searcy

    Gus Searcy has been involved in Pre-Paid Legal/ Legal Shield. Testified about how the company operates.

  • Leslie Udy

    The final witness for the State was Leslie Udy. A resident of Utah, Udy testified she met Arias in September 2006 at a work-related conference in Nevada. Udy said Arias had expressed concerns that Alexander was cheating on her. Later, when she met with Arias in Utah after Alexander's murder, Udy said she observed cuts on Arias' hand, which the defendant attributed to a broken glass. Udy said Arias never told her she had killed Alexander. During cross-examination by public defender Kirk Nurmi, Udy testified that Arias was a soft-spoken, gentle person and that she had trouble believing Arias could kill Alexander. It was obvious during redirect by Maricopa County prosecutor Juan Martinez that he was not very pleased with Udy's testimony regarding Arias' demeanor. In an effort to demonstrate to the jury that Udy did not know Arias as well as she might think, Martinez showed her photos of a nude Arias posing in sexually explicit positions and asked her if she knew about that side of Arias. Udy replied, "No." Martinez then showed Udy a photo the prosecutor alleges was taken during the murder -- a photo he claims shows Alexander in a pool of blood near Arias' leg. He asked Udy if she was familiar with the pants Arias was allegedly wearing in the photo. Udy replied, "No." Martinez then announced that the state was resting its case.

  • Jeff Strohn

    Jeff Strohn, an employee of Sprint Nextel, briefly discussed phone calls made from Jodi Arias' cell phone after Travis Alexander's murder.

  • Raphael Colombo

    Raphael Colombo runs the Budget rent-a-car shop in Redding, Calif. Testified he rented a car to Arias on June 2, 2008. Testified when she returned it the floor mats were missing and there were stains that he thought were caused by Kool-Aid on the front and rear seats.

  • Michael Galieti

    Michael Galieti, a former police officer in West Jordan, Utah, testified he stopped Jodi Arias on June 5, 2008, because the license plate on her vehicle was upside down. She attributed this to someone playing a joke on her, Galieti said.

  • Larry Gladysh

    Larry Gladysh, a detective with the Mesa Police Department homicide unit, testified he obtained a warrant for Travis Alexander's cell phone so that he could get the pin number changed to access Alexander's voice mail.

  • Joey Citizen

    Joey Citizen, a Verizon wireless records custodian, went over Travis Alexander's phone records from May and June 2008.

  • Michael Melendez

    Michael Melendez, a member of the Mesa Police Department. Melendez analyzed a laptop collected in the case.

  • Kevin Friedman

    Kevin Friedman, a California police officer with the Yreka Police Department. He investigated the reported theft of a .25 caliber gun by Jodi Arias' grandparents days before Travis Alexander's murder.

  • Jodi Legg

    Jodi Legg is a forensic scientist with the City of Mesa Crime Lab.

  • Lisa Perry

    Lisa Perry, a forensic scientist with the City of Mesa Crime Lab who examined blood evidence in the case.

  • Nathan Mendes

    Nathan Mendes was a sheriff's detective in Siskeyou County at the time of the Jodi Arias investigation.

  • Kevin Biggs

    Kevin Biggs, a latent print examiner with Mesa police, testified he took Jodi Arias' finger and palm prints on June 17, 2008.

  • Maureen Smith

    Maureen Smith, a latent print examiner with Mesa police, testified she had scanned prints of Jodi Arias and took a DNA sample from Arias on June 17, 2008.

  • Ryan Burns

    Ryan Burns, a once budding love interest of Jodi Arias, testified he had a heated make-out session with her just 24 hours after she allegedly stabbed and shot Travis Alexander to death. According to Burns, Arias visited him in Utah on June 5, 2008. Burns testified that Arias had dyed hair and had cuts on her hands when she visited him. "She had two small bandages on a couple of her fingers,” Burns, testified during day four of her trial. Burns said Arias explained the injuries by saying she worked at Margaritaville and had broken a glass and cut her finger. He also testified that Arias naturally dark hair had dyed blonde.

  • Elizabeth Northcutt

    Elizabeth Northcutt, a forensic firearms examiner for Mesa police, testified she had examined a cartridge casing found at the crime scene. Northcutt said the casing was for a Winchester .25-caliber semi-automatic.

  • Dr. Kevin Horn

    Dr. Kevin Horn, of the Maricopa County Medical Examiner office, described on day three of the trial how Travis Alexander was stabbed 27 times, shot in the right brow with a .25-caliber gun, and nearly decapitated when his throat, voice box and arteries were cut. As Horn spoke, jurors looked at photos of the dead Arizona man whose body, Horn said, was found in his Mesa home June 9, 2008, several days after he was killed, decomposing and starting to mummify. According to Horn, Alexander's stab wounds were very deep and inflicted with major force. It was, Horn testified, impossible to determine if Alexander was dead before he was shot due to the amount of decomposition. The cause of death was excessive blood loss from the victim's body, he said, and Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers, a key element of the prosecution's case.

  • Heather Conner

    Heather Conner, a fingerprint examiner with Mesa police, testified about the crime scene and evidence recovered by crime scene investigators.

  • Esteban Flores

    A Mesa police detective, Esteban Flores, was the lead detective in Travis Alexander's homicide. Flores testified in court that he was at Alexander's house on June 9, 2008, after the victim’s body was discovered by friends. Flores also testified about the crime scene and a phone interview he conducted with Jodi Arias the following day.

  • Marie Hall

    Marie Hall testified she had dated Travis Alexander. She said she felt very safe with him and he never showed his temper.

  • Sterling Williams

    Sterling Williams, a patrol officer with Mesa police, testified about what he witness when he responded to the 911 by Alexander's friends. Williams described the condition of Alexander's body to the jury in gruesome detail.

  • Travis Alexander's Family

    Travis Alexander's family in court during testimony in the case.

  • Jodi Arias' Family

    Jodi Arias' mother and aunt seated in court.

  • Sherry Stephens

    Sherry K. Stephens is a judge for the Maricopa County Superior Court in Arizona. According to Stephens’s <a href="http://www.superiorcourt.maricopa.gov/JudicialBiographies/Judges/judicialBio.asp?jdgID=105&jdgUSID=217">judicial biography</a>, she received a Bachelor’s degree in criminal justice, an undergraduate degree and J.D. from Arizona State University. Prior to becoming a Superior Court judge for Maricopa County, she served as an Assistant Attorney General in the Arizona Attorney General's Office from 1980 to 2001. While there she specialized in organized crime and fraud. Stephens became a judge in 2001 and on November 6, 2012, she was retained with 73% of the vote in the general election.

  • Juan Martinez

    Maricopa County prosecutor Juan Martinez is considered one of Arizona’s top death-penalty prosecutors. According to the <a href="http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/2002-08-29/news/justice-delayed/">Phoenix New Times</a>, Martinez is despised by many defense attorneys, “because he relentlessly plays hardball on the job.” A <a href="http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/1999-07-01/news/wake-up-call/2/">graduate of at Arizona State University</a>, Martinez was licensed to practice law in 1984 and joined the <a href="http://www.maricopacountyattorney.org/">Maricopa County Attorney's Office</a> in 1988. Martinez, according to the Times, rarely enters into plea bargains and is known to be meticulous in preparation and presentation.

  • Kirk Nurmi

    Arias attorney, Kirk Nurmi.

  • Jennifer Willmott

    Defense attorney Jennifer Willmott (seated right next to client Jodi Arias), <a href="http://www.willmottlaw.com/attorneys.html">according to her biography on the Willmott Law website</a>, received her undergraduate degree from the University of Arizona in 1992 and graduated from Arizona State University School of Law in 1995. Upon graduating law school, Willmott joined the Maricopa County Public Defender's Office. “She has successfully tried and won serious felony charges including aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, sexual assault, kidnapping, child molest[ation], homicide, and auto theft,” Willmott’s bio reads. Willmott was assigned to represent Jodi Arias in January 2012, after the young woman’s attorney, Victoria Washington, withdrew from the case.

  • Jodi Arias

    Jodi Ann Arias, a 32-year-old photographer Yreka, Calif., Arias is accused of shooting her lover, Travis Alexander, in the face, stabbing him 27 times and slitting his throat from ear to ear in the shower of his Mesa, Ariz., apartment. Alexander met Arias at a conference in Las Vegas in Sept. 2006. At the time, Alexander was a 30-year-old motivational speaker and legal-insurance salesman. Arias was trying to make it as a saleswoman and an independent photographer. The two had an instant connection and began dating. The relationship continued until June 2007, when the couple split. On June 4, 2008, Arias allegedly came to Alexander's home in Mesa. They had sex and took explicit photos of each other, according to court records. Five days later, Alexander's friends went to his home and found him dead inside his standup shower. During the course of the investigation, authorities were notified by the forensic lab that hair and a bloody print found inside Alexander's home belonged to Arias. DNA typing results also indicated that the bloody print was a mixture of Arias' and Alexander's DNA. A grand jury indicted Arias on July 9, 2008 – the day she celebrated her 29th birthday -- on first-degree murder charges in the death of Alexander. Arias was extradited to Arizona, where she entered a not guilty plea at her arraignment. Arias, according to police, initially denied she was at Alexander’s apartment on the day of his homicide. She later changed her story, stating she was there, but he was killed after two intruders broke in. Her story was later changed again, police said. In the third version, she allegedly claimed there were no intruders and she killed Alexander in self-defense. Arias, according to prosecutors, claimed that Alexander "became angry when she dropped his camera" and that she was forced to kill him in self-defense. Opening statements in Arias' trial began on January 2. If convicted, Arias could face the death penalty.

  • Travis Alexander

    Travis Alexander, a 30-year-old motivational speaker and legal-insurance salesman, met Jodi Arias at a conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, in September 2006. Alexander and Arias began dating in February 2007, but broke up nearly four months later. Although they were no longer dating, the couple maintained a physical relationship. In April 2008, Alexander made a blog entry stating: "This Year will be the Best year of my life. This is the year that will eclipse all others. I will earn more, learn more, travel more, serve more, love more, give more and be more than all the other years of my life combined." Alexander was found dead in his apartment on June 9, 2008. Advanced decomposition suggested that he had been dead for several days. Large amounts of blood were discovered throughout the master bathroom, including on the floors, walls and sink area. It was ultimately discovered that Alexander had been shot in the right brow with a .25-caliber gun -- the bullet was found lodged in his left cheek -- and that he had been stabbed 27 times. Someone had also cut his throat from ear to ear. Investigators found several vital clues inside Alexander's bedroom and bathroom. A spent .25-caliber shell casing was located on the floor near the sink, and a hair and a small latent print in blood were found near the entrance of the bathroom hall. Also, a digital camera was found in the washing machine in the downstairs laundry room. The camera appeared as though it had been run through the wash cycle. When questioned by police, Alexander's friends and family members indicated that Arias should be questioned. Arias went to the Mesa Police Headquarters and was voluntarily fingerprinted. She also gave investigators a sample of her saliva for DNA testing. While waiting for the lab test results to come back, investigators were notified that several shocking images, some of which had been deleted, were recovered from the memory card of the camera found in Alexander's washing machine. The deleted pictures were of Alexander, naked in the shower, just before his death. He appeared to be posing in some of the photographs; however, other photos, which were dark and grainy, "were of a subject on the floor of the bathroom bleeding profusely," police said. Six other photos, time-stamped that same day, allegedly showed Arias on Alexander's bed. According to police, "all were nude pictures," and in some she was in "provocative sexual poses." On June 26, 2008, investigators were notified that hair and a bloody print found inside Alexander's home belonged to Arias. DNA typing results also indicated that the bloody print was a mixture of Arias' and Alexander's DNA. A grand jury indicted Arias on first-degree murder charges in the death of Travis Alexander. Four months later, the Maricopa County Attorney's Office announced they would seek the death penalty against Arias. Arias, who claims she killed Alexander in self-defense, finally went to trial on January 2. The hearing is ongoing today. If convicted, Arias could face the death penalty.

Once the jury was escorted out of the courtroom, Nurmi filed a motion asking for dismissal of the premeditation charge. According to Nurmi, prosecutors had failed to present evidence of premeditation and therefore a reasonable jury could not convict Arias on a charge of premeditation.

Martinez voiced his disapproval of the motion, arguing that Arias had gone to great lengths to plan Alexander's murder. Martinez said Arias staged a burglary of her own home, rented a car, and brought a gun and a knife to Alexander's home.

Judge Sherry Stephens said she would review the motion.

While there will likely be some criticism of the prosecution's decision to pull up stakes on day nine, without presenting additional evidence or witnesses, Seattle lawyer and legal analyst Anne Bremner said she feels the state did an excellent job presenting the case to the jury.

"I think that the state has done well," Bremner told The Huffington Post. "They built their case step by step. They showed Jodi's lies and depravity. They showed her obsession. They showed her lack of remorse. She confessed. They have a dead body."

Bremner added, "In the Casey Anthony and O.J. Simpson trials, the DAs took far too long. They overtried their cases trying to anticipate any criticism or defense. As a result of that, they bored the jurors, obfuscated the issues, diluted their own powerful evidence and ultimately lost."

If the defense motion for dismissal is denied, Arias' lawyers will begin presenting their case at 10:30 a.m. on Jan. 29, according to a Maricopa County Superior Court spokesperson. If convicted, Arias could face the death penalty.

Related on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Jodi Arias Drivers License

    The drivers license Jodi Arias presented when she rented a car prior to Travis Alexander's murder.

  • WARNING

    Some photos in this slideshow are graphic and may be disturbing to some viewers.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Jodi Arias taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at Travis Alexander's home. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken on the same day of Alexander's murder.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his home. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken on the same day of Alexander's murder.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Jodi Arias taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at Travis Alexander's home. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken on the same day of Alexander's murder.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken on the same day of Alexander's murder.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Evidence

    The last photo ever taken of Travis Alexander, directly before his murder. The photo was recovered from the camera card.

  • Camera Photo's

    A photo of Travis Alexander taken from the camera card found in the washing machine at his. Prosecutors allege this photo was taken minutes before he was murdered.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    A photo of Travis Alexander's body in the shower of his apartment.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    A photo of Travis Alexander's body in the shower of his apartment.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    A photo of Travis Alexander's body in the shower of his apartment.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    The prosecution contends this photo, shown in court on Jan. 8, 2013, shows Travis Alexander had multiple self-defense wounds to his palms and fingers that indicate he had fought for his life during the knife attack.

  • Autopsy Photo

    Autopsy photo of Travis Alexander's legs.

  • Autopsy Photo

    Autopsy photo of Travis Alexander's foot.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    A photo of Travis Alexander's body in the shower of his apartment.

  • Autopsy

    X-ray image of Travis Alexander's skull that was shown in court.

  • Autopsy

    X-ray image of Travis Alexander's skull that was shown in court.

  • Autopsy

    X-ray image of Travis Alexander's back that was shown in court.

  • Jodi Arias

    According to Jodi Arias' defense attorney, Travis Alexander had this shirt made for her to show his ownership of her.

  • Jodi Arias And Travis Alexander

    A photo presented in court by the defense that shows Jodi Arias and Travis Alexander when they first met in September 2006.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Ryan Burns And Jodi Arias Messages

    Excerpts of messages shown in court that were exchanged, according to prosecutors, by Jodi Arias and her former love interest, Ryan Burns.

  • Jodi Arias And Travis Alexander

    Another photo shown in court, of Travis Alexander baptizing Jodi Arias as a Mormon.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    Bathroom sink.

  • Travis Alexander Crime Scene

    Bathroom sink.

  • Sketch

    The medical examiner's remarks on Travis Alexander's injuries.

  • Sketch

    The medical examiner's remarks on Travis Alexander's injuries.

  • Sketch

    The medical examiner's remarks on Travis Alexander's injuries.

  • Sketch

    The medical examiner's remarks on Travis Alexander's injuries.