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  • New Mexico: 46.3 percent

    New Mexico will likely become the first Latino-majority state in modern U.S. history. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Texas: 37.6 percent

    Political analysts wonder whether the booming Hispanic population may turn the state purple in coming years. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • California: 37.6 percent

    As of July, both the Latino and non-Hispanic white populations will account for 39 percent of California's people. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Arizona: 29.6 percent

    The state that pioneered using local government to crack down on illegal immigration is the fourth-most Latino state in the union. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Nevada: 26.5 percent

    With a name like "Nevada" (Spanish for "snowfall" or "snow-covered") and a capital called "Las Vegas" (Spanish for "meadows"), it isn't surprising that more than a quarter of the state is Latino. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Florida: 22.5 percent

    Best known as the home of the politically powerful Cuban exile community, Florida is <a href="http://www.npr.org/2012/06/27/155855497/influx-of-puerto-ricans-changes-fla-s-voter-calculus">home to an almost equally large Puerto Rican population</a>. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Colorado: 20.7 percent

    Coloradans have <a href="12 Latinos, four in the Senate and eight in the House of Representatives, the highest number in the last 25 years. Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/lifestyle/2013/01/07/after-50-yrs-struggle-latinos-in-colorado-still-face-serious-difficulties/#ixzz2IpYScWYU">elected 12 Latinos to the state legislature</a>. Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/lifestyle/2013/01/07/after-50-yrs-struggle-latinos-in-colorado-still-face-serious-difficulties/#ixzz2IpYScWYU Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • New Jersey: 17.7 percent

    The population of <a href="http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=bkmk">Union City, New Jersey is 85 percent Latino</a>, according to the 2010 Census. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • New York: 17.6 percent

    Historically a magnet for migrants Puerto Ricans, Dominicans and South Americans, <a href="http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2012/05/10/new-york-changing-latino-population/">New York has seen its Mexican population surge in recent years</a>. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Illinois: 15.8 percent

    Were it not for the <a href="http://www.naleo.org/downloads/ILLINOISCENSUSRELEASEFINAL.pdf">Latino population in Illinois</a>, the state's population would be declining. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

  • Connecticut: 13.4 percent

    The Northeastern state is home to a large Ecuadoran community, as the country found out when <a href="http://yaledailynews.com/crosscampus/2012/03/18/ecuadorian-ambassador-visits-new-haven-east-haven/">East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo, Jr.</a> made culturally insensitive comments about eating tacos last year. Source: <a href="http://www.pewhispanic.org/2011/03/24/appendix-additional-charts-and-tables/">Pew Hispanic Center</a>. All numbers based on 2010 estimates.

California will cross a historic threshold this year, when the Latino population will begin to outnumber the Anglo population.

Although California has the largest Latino population in the country, with more than 14 million according to the Pew Hispanic Center, it isn’t the most Latino state in the union. That honor belongs to New Mexico, where nearly half of the population identifies as Hispanic, compared to roughly 39 percent in California.

Analysts expect Latinos to become the majority population in the southwestern state by 2020. This would reverse the pattern established when the first Anglo settlers made their way to New Mexico in the late 19th century.

History may be, in a sense, repeating itself. The seven states with the highest Latino populations were all once Spanish colonies. With the exception of Florida, they all also once belonged to Mexico, in whole or in part.

The list doesn't include the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico, with a population of 3.7 million people, nearly all of whom consider themselves Hispanic.

Check out the 11 most Latino U.S. states in the slideshow above.

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  • Mexico

    The nation's highest Latino population comprises 31,798,000 immigrants. The Los Angeles-Long Beach area has the nation's highest number of Mexican immigrants, with 4,569,000, although other large concentrations are found in the Chicago metro area and throughout Texas.

  • Puerto Rico

    The second-largest Hispanic group in the country, Puerto Ricans make up a population of 4,624,000. The nation's largest concentration (1,192,000 people) is situated in the New York-northeastern New Jersey area.

  • Cuba

    The U.S. is home to approximately 1,786,000 Cuban immigrants. Many are concentrated in Miami (784,000, to be exact) as well as the Fort Lauderdale (84,000) and Tampa-St. Petersburg areas (81,000), although the New York/New Jersey area's population (130,000) is considerable, too.

  • El Salvador

    Pockets of the nation's considerable Salvadorian population (1,649,000) exist on both coasts. Los Angeles and Long Beach are home to 414,000 Salvadorians; 240,000 live in Washington, D.C., and 187,000 call the New York metro area home.

  • Dominican Republic

    Nearly half of the nation's Dominican population (1,415,000) happen to like New York -- 799,000 call it home. Other sizable pockets include the Boston/New Hampshire region (86,000) and Miami (59,000).

  • Guatemala

    The U.S. is home to 1,044,000 Guatemalans, with 249,000 of those residing in the Los Angeles metro area. Meanwhile, 85,000 live in the New York metro area, with another 53,000 residing near Washington, D.C.

  • Colombia

    Colombian immigrants account for 909,000 U.S. citizens. Of that, 119,000 live in Miami, and another 65,000 call Fort Lauderdale home.

  • Honduras

    Some 633,000 U.S. residents identify as being of Honduran origin. Of that, 66,000 reside in the Houston-Brazoria, Texas, area.

  • Ecuador

    A total of 565,000 people in the U.S. are of Ecuadorian origin. According to 2009 statistics, two thirds of the population (or 64 percent) live in the Northeast, with 41 percent living in New York.

  • Peru

    Compared to other Hispanic groups, the Peruvian population (533,000) is considerably more geographically dispersed. About 19 percent of the population lives in Florida, while 12 percent resides in New York. Another 16 percent reside either in California or New Jersey.