SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal judge rejected Apple Inc.'s demand to increase the $1.05 billion in damages a jury ordered Samsung Electronics Inc. to pay its fiercest rival in the smartphone market.

Late Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh also rejected demands from both companies to conduct another trial on different issues over claims that the South Korean company unfairly used technology controlled by Apple to build its iPads and iPhones to market knockoff products. She also upheld the validity of the Apple patents at the center of the dispute.

A jury in August found that Samsung "infringed" six Apple patents to create and market 26 models of smartphones and computer tablets and ordered the $1.05 billion award. The jury found several other older Samsung products didn't infringe any Apple patents.

Earlier, the judge refused to block sales of the infringing products in the United States after she said Apple failed to show consumer demand for the Samsung devices was driven by the purloined technology, including the "pinch-to-zoom" function. Apple is appealing that decision.

Samsung contends that only three of the 26 older-generation products are still offered for sale in the United Sates.

Apple has filed a new lawsuit contending that Samsung's current products are also using Apple technology. Koh scheduled trial for that matter in 2014.

In a series of four orders Tuesday night, the judge painstakingly considered each side's myriad claims that the nine-member jury wrongly considered evidence and misread complex patent law. With a few minor exceptions, the judge concluded that the jurors' got it right as far as the law goes.

"Accordingly, the trial was fairly conducted, with uniform time limits and rules of evidence applied to both sides," the judge said. "A new trial would be contrary to the interests of justice."

The judge is still considering Samsung's demands to reduce the $1.05 billion award. The jurors had filled out a verdict form listing the damages Samsung owed Apple for each of the 26 products it found to have used infringing technology. Samsung contends that many of the line-item calculations were done incorrectly and that it was due a big reduction in the award.

Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet declined to comment. A Samsung spokesperson didn't respond to emails late Tuesday.

At a hearing in December, the judge seemed inclined to rework at least a few of the jury's damages calculations, but gave no indication by what amount.

Apple and Samsung are the top two smartphone makers and are locked in a no-holds-barred, worldwide battle for supremacy of the $346 billion annual sales market, appearing in courtrooms around the globe accusing each other of stealing technology and trade infractions.

International Data Corp. on Friday released a report showing smartphone shipments soared 36 percent worldwide in the fourth quarter as the sleek devices supplanted personal computers and other gadgets on holiday shopping lists.

Samsung Electronics Co. retained its bragging rights as the smartphone leader, shipping nearly 64 million devices for a 29 percent share of the global market. Apple ranked second with nearly 48 million iPhones shipped during the fourth quarter, translating into a market share of 22 percent.

Earlier on HuffPost:


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  • 'Pouring' File Transfer

    The HP TouchPad's "<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqSm-pusG-g" target="_hplink">touch to share</a>" feature has nothing on this futuristic Apple patent, which illustrates Apple devices emmulating natural, real-world gestures. In the illustrated example above, an iPhone is tilted over an iPad in order to share files, the way you would do if you were "pouring" the data from one device into the other. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2011/0163944.html" target="_hplink">2010</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2011/07/apple-wants-to-beat-hps-webos-sharing-feature-with-something-cooler.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • Head-Mounted Display

    Back in 2006, Apple filed a patent for a laser-based binocular display unit, which could attach to glasses, helmets, or goggles. In theory, users could plug the device into their iPod and watch videos via the head-mounted apparatus instead of on the tiny iPod display. This wearable system would also let the user remain mobile while enjoying media entertainment. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2008/0088937.html" target="_hplink">2006</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2008/04/apple-preparing-a-cool-ipod-visual-head-display-system.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • Double-Sided iPhone

    This filing makes us wonder what it would be like to have an iPhone with separate displays on its front and back. If each display operated independently, then users could control navigation (or a table of contents) on one side while reading or watching video on the other. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2011/0175805.html" target="_hplink">2010</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2011/08/apple-thinks-that-youll-flip-over-a-future-generation-iphone.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • 3D Holographic Projector

    Many technology companies are betting that 3D is the next big thing, and fortunately for Apple, it already has a few patents to its name. One such example is a desktop display system that projects a 3D hologram, rather than projecting a 2D image onto a flat screen. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7843449.html" target="_hplink">2006</a> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2008/03/apple-working-on-3d-holographic-projection-displays.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • Solar-Powered MacBooks

    Using a reflector that captures light externally, future MacBook owners could enjoy using their laptops outside while harnessing the sun's natural energy to power the device. Apple's patent states that a "translucent surface may also serve to protect the rear face of the display screen from damage". <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2010/0073791.html" target="_hplink">2008</a></strong> <em>Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2010/03/solar-powered-macbooks-may-be-in-our-future.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a></em>

  • Inductive Chargers

    In one iteration of the system, users wrap earphone cables around a charging tower and place a conductive metal mesh on their device in order to power-up. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2011/0188677.html" target="_hplink">2010</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2011/08/apples-inductive-charging-patent-finally-surfaces.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • Shape-Shifting iPods

    Picture this: an iPod Classic whose touch wheel can morph into a television remote keypad. Currently, input devices use a specific set of operations (such as buttons, keys, touch screens) to command a computer; but, a shape shifting configuration that can physically change interface topography could be a complete game-changer in consumer electronics. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2010/0162109.html" target="_hplink">2009</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2010/06/apple-introduces-the-incredible-shape-shifting-device-interface.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>

  • Liquidmetal Battery Power

    This patent would let Apple use liquidmetal, or "<a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7862957.html" target="_hplink">amorphous alloy</a>" collector plates for internal component fuel cells. <a href="http://www.cultofmac.com/apple-is-granted-its-first-liquidmetal-patent-exclusive/75486" target="_hplink">According to Cult of Mac</a>, this technology "could power mobile phones for more than 30 days without recharging and notebooks for 20 hours or more." <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7862957.html" target="_hplink">2004</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.cultofmac.com/apple-is-granted-its-first-liquidmetal-patent-exclusive/75486" target="_hplink">Cult of Mac</a>

  • 3D Gestures

    3D gesturing allows users to rotate objects on the touch screen, gain different perspectives, control color and texture, and more. This technology could be a breakthrough in computer-aided design applications and games. <strong>Filed: <a href="http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2011/0164029.html" target="_hplink">2010</a></strong> Source: <a href="http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2011/07/apples-wild-new-3d-gesturing-is-aimed-at-cad-avatar-creation-more.html" target="_hplink">Patently Apple</a>