Are you one of those people who absolutely love the idea of Google Glass -- those far-out, futuristic glasses that Google has been taunting us with for almost a year now?

Well, you might be able to snatch up a pair earlier than expected. All you have to do is impress a few Google employees, and you could be one of the first 8,000 folks in America with your very own Google Glass.

In conjunction with the release of a video of Google Glass in action, Google also announced Wednesday morning a sweepstakes of sorts that will award several lucky entrants with one of the first sets of Glass. Google has set up a website for an #ifihadglass contest and says that it is "looking for bold, creative individuals" to be among the first "Explorers" to beta test the smart spectacles before they go on sale for the general public.

In order to win, all you have to do is tell Google, on either Twitter or Google+, what you would do if you had your own Google Glass hardware. Past that, here are the (quite minimal) rules:

- Your application must be 50 words or less - You must include #ifihadglass in your application - You can include up to 5 photos with your application - You can include a short video (15 secs max) - Be sure to follow us on Google+ (+ProjectGlass) or Twitter (@projectglass) so that we can contact you directly - You must be at least 18 years old and live in the U.S. to apply

Your application also must be in English, and contestants are limited to three submissions, per the Terms and Conditions. Google will be awarding Explorer Edition Google Glass hardware to up to 8,000 participants in its #ifihadglass contest.

Google will be taking applications through Google+ or Twitter through Feb. 27. The "winners" still have to pay $1,500 for Glass should they win, and pick up the product in person in New York, Los Angeles or San Francisco. It's less of a giveaway, in other words, and more of an application process to prove that you're worthy of being an early adopter.

Indeed, Google has said that the price of Google Glass will be significantly lower than the $1500 price tag it's making developers shell out for an early model; it's been reported that the final price, when Google Glass is made available to the public, will be closer to what a premium smartphone costs.

You can read more about the contest here; and if you have absolutely no idea what we're talking about, here's a video of Google Glass in action that Google posted Wednesday morning:


Earlier on HuffPost:

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  • Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin

    On April 7, Google co-founder Sergey Brin was the first Googler to be spotted in the wild wearing Google Glasses. He wore the futuristic specs to a charity event in San Francisco. Somewhat ironically, the charity at the event was a foundation fighting against blindness, and the event centered around a dinner eaten in total darkness.<br> <br> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/7050489913/in/photostream/lightbox/" target="_hplink">Via Flickr of Photographer Thomas Hawk</a>.

  • Google Co-Founder Sergey Brin

    Here's Brin with technology journalist Robert Scoble at the same event. You can <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/06/sergey-brin-google-glasses_n_1408488.html" target="_hplink">read more about Brin's outing here</a>. <br> <br> <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/7050487947/in/photostream" target="_hplink">Via Flickr of photographer Thomas Hawk</a>.

  • A Prototype Of How Google Glasses Might Work With Prescription Glasses

    On April 12, about a week after Brin's public appearance, Google designer Isabelle Olsson allayed the fears of many a prescription glasses-wearing folk <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/1/110625673290805573805/posts/Nmc8LuwFw5M" target="_hplink">with this photo on her Google+ page</a>. The photo depicts "an early mock-up to show how the device might work with prescription glasses," confirming that those who already wear glasses won't miss out on the fun when Google's augmented reality glasses do emerge.

  • Sebastian Thrun On Charlie Rose

    Most of what we know about Google's Glasses experiment has come from engineer Sebastian Thrun, a Project Glass lead engineer and the head engineer in the secretive Google[x] laboratory. On April 25, Thrun talked to the venerable Charlie Rose about the state of Google Glasses, as well as his Google's self-driving car and his disruptive online education startup <a href="http://Udacity.com" target="_hplink">Udacity</a>. <br> <br> The interview contains multitudes of information about possible futures for technology, but if you just want the dirt on Google Glasses, the first three-and-a-half minutes of this video are for you.

  • Sebastian Thrun Takes A Photo of Charlie Rosen While On The Charlie Rose Show

    During the Charlie Rose interview, Thrun snapped this picture of Rose and posted it to his Google+ page -- all while talking, and without lifting a finger. It was the first indication we had that Google's glasses, in their early stages, actually worked.

  • Sebastian Thrun Takes A Photo Of His Son Using His Glasses

    Thrun <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/1/101416274833608453021/posts" target="_hplink">posted this photo</a>, snapped hands-free (obviously) with Google Glasses, to his Google+ page on May 8th.

  • Google+ Head Vic Gundotra

    The same day Thrun posted his whirl-around photo of his son, a couple of Google guys made this photo public: The man in the picture is Vic Gundotra, VP of Social at Google, and the photo was taken by Bradley Horowitz, VP of Product at Google, and <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/1/113116318008017777871/posts/MNBUpT7z3hn" target="_hplink">posted to his Google+ account</a>.

  • Google CEO Larry Page

    Finally, on Tuesday, May 22, <a href="https://plus.google.com/u/1/110804953626559077511/posts" target="_hplink">Google employee Jason Mayes</a> uploaded a few photos of CEO Larry Page to his Google+ profile. Page was speaking at the Google Zeitgeist event in England. Mayes has since taken the photos down, but not before our <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/22/larry-page-google-glasse/?grcc=33333Z98ZtrendingZ0" target="_hplink">buddies at TechCrunch saved the photos themselves</a>. <br> <br> <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/22/larry-page-google-glasse/?grcc=33333Z98ZtrendingZ0" target="_hplink">Via TechCrunch</a>.

  • Google CEO Larry Page

    Another image of Page from Jason Mayes. <br> <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/22/larry-page-google-glasse/?grcc=33333Z98ZtrendingZ0" target="_hplink">Via TechCrunch</a>.

  • Google CEO Larry Page

    One last look at Larry Page in his company's AR glasses prototype. <br> <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/22/larry-page-google-glasse/?grcc=33333Z98ZtrendingZ0" target="_hplink">Via TechCrunch</a>.

  • The Original Google Glasses "Project Glass" Video

    Here's the Google concept video that started it all. Google has said that the video was meant to create excitement about the device and to solicit ideas from commenters about what they would like a pair of augmented reality glasses to do. <br> <br> What you see in the video will not necessarily ship with the final product, in other words. Vic Gundotra <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57434191-94/no-terminator-style-overlays-in-first-batch-of-google-glasses/" target="_hplink">recently reiterated that point in an interview with CNET</a>. <br> <br> Along with that first video, Google also posted a bunch of prototype designs for its Glasses. These aren't the real deal, but we've included them hereafter for your perusal.

  • Google Glasses Prototype Images

    <a href="https://plus.google.com/111626127367496192147/posts" target="_hplink">Via Project Glass</a>.

  • Google Glasses Prototype Images

    <a href="https://plus.google.com/111626127367496192147/posts" target="_hplink">Via Project Glass</a>.

  • Google Glasses Prototype Images

    <a href="https://plus.google.com/111626127367496192147/posts" target="_hplink">Via Project Glass</a>.

  • Google Glasses Prototype Images

    <a href="https://plus.google.com/111626127367496192147/posts" target="_hplink">Via Project Glass</a>.

  • Google Glasses Prototype Images

    <a href="https://plus.google.com/111626127367496192147/posts" target="_hplink">Via Project Glass</a>.