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Vintage Photo Of Early 1900s Dorm Room Shows Little Has Changed (PHOTOS)

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Have you ever wondered what the life of a college student looked like back in the day? You know, when kids got around in horse drawn carriages instead of used cars? Well Reddit user xarvox offers us a glimpse back with these remarkable vintage photographs of college dorm rooms, and we were surprised to discover that not much has changed.

vintage photo

Photo by Xarvox

According to the Reddit user, this 110-year-old photograph documents his great grandmother's living quarters in Lynchburg, Virginia's Randolph College. Prior to its transition to a coeducational school in 2007, the private liberal arts school was originally called the Randolph-Macon Woman's College, the first institution of its kind in the American south to formally educate women. With this knowledge of the time's social climate in mind, xarvox's image is truly remarkable.

But historical context aside, it's evident from the picture that, just like when we lived at school, students try to make their living quarters feel like home. And much of what we see here looks like the usual batch of everyday items we'd find in a current student's room: a study desk and walls plastered with photos, sports memorabilia and decor. What threw us for a loop were the unidentifiable patterned boxes in the corner of her room. Some of the comments guessed that they were lounge chairs, traveling trunks or storage units.

And it looks like dorm room interiors weren't the only things about college life that remain similar. Xarvox also posted a vintage photo of his great grandfather's room at Cornell University, which depicted the Ivy league student "and his buddies goofing off before graduation." Some things never change!

vintage photographs

Photo by Xarvox

And to bring us back into 2013, here's a list of the best college towns to live in.

10 Best College Towns - 2013
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