Saturday marks the 45th anniversary of the My Lai massacre, the mass murder of hundreds of unarmed South Vietnamese civilians at the hands of U.S. soldiers. The incident marked a turning point in the Vietnam War, sparking worldwide outrage at the atrocities committed by American troops.

LIFE Magazine is commemorating the anniversary by republishing its original coverage of that fateful day in 1968. The Dec. 5, 1969 issue featured stunning photographs by Army photographer Ron Haeberle, whose images captured the stark horror of the acts committed in My Lai.

Check out this screenshot of the magazine's original page spread:

my lai massacre

From LIFE:

Two simple syllables, My Lai (pronounced "me lie"), are today a reminder of what America lost in the jungles of Vietnam: namely, any claim to moral high ground in a war often defined by those back home as a battle between right and wrong. For the Vietnamese, meanwhile, the March 1968 massacre in the tiny village of My Lai is just one among numerous instances of rape, torture and murder committed by troops — Americans, South Vietnamese, Viet Cong and others — in the course of that long, divisive war.

To see photos of My Lai and read LIFE Magazine's original coverage of the massacre, click here.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • John Lennon (1940 - 1980) and Yoko Ono pose on the steps of the Apple building in London, holding one of the posters that they distributed to the world's major cities as part of a peace campaign protesting against the Vietnam War. 'War Is Over, If You Want It'. (Photo by Frank Barratt/Getty Images)

  • NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: Dr. Benjamin Spock (2nd-L), child-care expert, Martin Luther King (C), clergyman and black civil rights campaigner, Father Frederick Reed and Cleveland Robinson, unionist leader, lead 16 March 1967 in New York a huge pacifist rally protesting United States involvement in the Vietnam war. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN: (FILES) This 20 December, 1972, file photo shows actress Jane Fonda addressing the media in Stockholm during a press conference protesting United States military involvement in the Vietnam war. Speaking about her upcoming autobiography 'Jane Fonda: My Life So Far,' during a television interview, Fonda described her visit to a North Vietnamese anti-aircraft gun site during the Vietnam War as one of the biggest mistakes of her life, according to media reports 31 March, 2005. The interview is scheduled to be broadcast 03 April on the CBS network. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • FILE - In a May 4, 1970 file photo, Ohio National Guard moves in on rioting students at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. Four persons were killed and eleven wounded when National Guardsmen opened fire. The U.S. Justice Department, citing "insurmountable legal and evidentiary barriers," won't reopen its investigation into the deadly 1970 shootings by Ohio National Guardsmen during a Vietnam War protest at Kent State University. Assistant Attorney General Thomas Perez discussed the obstacles in a letter to Alan Canfora, a wounded student who requested that the investigation be reopened. The Justice Department said Tuesday, April 24, 2012 it would not comment beyond the letter. (AP Photo, File)

  • HANOI, VIET NAM: US actress and peace activist Jane Fonda, holding a camera, visits 25 July 1972 a Hanoi site bombed by US airplanes. Fonda's trip to North Vietnam was part of her protest campaign against the US involvement in the Vietnam war. US bombers, including B-52 strato-fortresses, started to bomb the North Vietnamese capital and its port Haiphong in April 1972. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 6: A angry demonstrator is arrested by a policeman in Washington 6 May 1971 during a protest against the Vietnam war. // Une jeune manifestante semble furieuse lors de son arrestation par un policier, a Washington le 6 mai 1971, lors d'une manifestation contre l'intervention des Etats-Unis au Vietnam. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • WASHINGTON, : American youths waving Vietcong flag and portrait of Chinese leader Mao Zedong stage a rally 25 April 1971 in front of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. protesting United States military involvement in the Vietnam war. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 26: An American youth waving a Vietcong flag sits on the head of a statue, in Washington 26 April 1971, during a protest against the Vietnam war. // Un jeune manifestant tenant un drapeau du vietcong est perchT sur la tOte d'une statue, a Washington le 26 avril 1971, pendant une manifestation contre la guerre du Vietnam. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 26: Veterans of the war in Vietnam take part in the protest by piling their medals, decorations and awards in a trash set down for the purpose in front of the Capitol during a demonstration against the Vietnam war in Washington 26 April 1971. A veteran places his army helmet on the pile of decorations. // Des anciens combattants de la guerre au Vietnam participant a une manifestation contre la guerre du Vietnam ont dTposT leurs decorations, mTdailles et insignes dans la dTcharge installTe a cet effet par les manifestants devant le Capitol a Washington le 26 avril 1971. L'un d'entre eux dTpose son casque sur la pile de dTcorations. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Anti-war demonstrators march outside the White House, on November 15, 1969 in Washington DC, for the second Moratorium Day, to protest against the continuing war in Vietnam. Millions of Americans took part in peace initiatives across the United States during the Moratorium Day, which is believed to have been the largest demonstration in US history with an estimated two million people involved. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Anti-war demonstrators march outside the White House, on November 15, 1969 in Washington DC, for the second Moratorium Day, to protest against the continuing war in Vietnam. Millions of Americans took part in peace initiatives across the United States during the Moratorium Day, which is believed to have been the largest demonstration in US history with an estimated two million people involved. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Anti-war demonstrators fill the steps of the United States Capitol Building on the day of the National Moratorium, on October 15, 1969 in Washington DC, to protest against the continuing war in Vietnam. Millions of Americans took part in peace initiatives across the United States during the Moratorium Day, which is believed to have been the largest demonstration in US history with an estimated two million people involved. (AFP/Getty Images)