WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration says now-discredited talking points about the deadly attacks in Libya are being taken out of context – as are emails seeking to revise the talking points.

State Department spokesman Patrick Ventrell told reporters Friday that ties to terrorism in the Benghazi attack were clear early on, but that information was sketchy.

The talking points were originally written for Congress. But before Congress got them, references were deleted to terrorism by the intelligence community, and to prior warnings of a possible attack.

The emails suggest there were political factors involved in deleting the material from the talking points, which were given to U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice for TV Sunday news-show appearances five days after the deadly attack last September.

Ventrell says critics are, quote, "cherry picking" those emails.

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  • A burnt out vehicle sits smoldering in flames after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A broken window after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • The U.S. Consulate after an attack by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A burnt car is seen after an attack on the U.S. Consulate by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Soot and debris spills out of the U.S. Consulate after an attack by protesters in Benghazi, Libya, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man looks at documents at the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. The graffiti reads, "no God but God," " God is great," and "Muhammad is the Prophet." (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man walks on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Glass, debris and overturned furniture are strewn inside a room in the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A man walks through a room in the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Libyans walk on the grounds of the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • Libyans walk on the grounds of the gutted U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, after an attack that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. (AP Photo/Ibrahim Alaguri)

  • A vehicle and the surrounding area are engulfed in flames after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • An armed man waves his rifle as buildings and cars are engulfed in flames after being set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle burns after it was set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle sits smoldering in flames after being set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A vehicle and surrounding buildings smolder after they were set on fire inside the US consulate compound in Benghazi, late on September 11, 2012. (STR/AFP/GettyImages)

  • LIBYA CONSULATE

    Map locates Benghazi, Libya, where the U.S. ambassador to Libya and three other Americans were killed in an attack