Local activists in Boulder held a rally on the Boulder County Courthouse lawn Monday in honor of Mother's Day urging commissioners to extend a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing.

Boulder mothers, children and activists sent out a press release that they were rallying because they are "concerned that if fracking is allowed, increased emissions, spills and leaks from operations will negatively impact public health."

The current moratorium on new oil and gas leases is set to expire on June 10. County commissioners have set a public hearing for this Thursday to discuss applying transportation impact fees on oil and gas companies operating in the county.

Boulder County's new "Oil and Gas Road Deterioration and Roadway Safety Fee" schedule will be incorporated into the Boulder County Land Use Code regulations if they are approved and would take effect on the same day the moratorium is set to expire.

"Our children are among those most impacted," Micah Parkin, a mother and organizer from 350 Boulder, a local environmental group, told The Boulder Daily Camera.

The Boulder City Council is set to consider a fracking moratorium within city limits and on city-owned lands on June 4.

"I think our lands could well be at risk, and we need to protect them," councilwoman Suzanne Jones, who supports the moratorium has said.

Voters in the city's neighboring Longmont have already approved a fracking ban, but the state has also sued Londmont over that ban and until the case steers its own course through the courts it's unknown what limits local governments can set on fracking.

According to activists though, the University of Colorado is working on a study of the health impacts of fracking and local environmentalists would like for the moratorium to be extended at least until that study is completed.

A study completed by the University of Denver last year already has linked a concentration of air pollutants five times higher than the federal hazard standard to within a half-mile of oil- and gas-well fracking operations.

“Our data show that it is important to include air pollution in the national dialogue on natural gas development that has focused largely on water exposures to hydraulic fracturing,” said Lisa McKenzie, Ph.D., MPH, lead author of the study and research associate at the Colorado School of Public Health.

Boulder County currently has 21 approved drilling permits, all for Encana Oil and Gas.

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  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker helps monitor water pumping pressure and temperature, at the site of a natural gas hydraulic fracturing and extraction operation run by Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Proponents of hydraulic fracturing point to the economic benefits from vast amounts of formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons the process can extract. Opponents point to potential environmental impacts, with some critics acknowledging that some fracking operations are far cleaner than others. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a rig drills for natural gas which will eventually be released using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on leased private property outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Once drilling is completed, wells are fractured to allow the flow of gas from deposits typically more than a mile underground. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, technicians inside a trailer direct the pressure and mix of water and chemicals pumped into an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. well during hydraulic fracturing, outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” raises concern among some that the chemicals used and hydrocarbons released can contaminate groundwater. Industry officials say an absence of documented, widespread problems with fracking proves the process is safe. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013, photo, a worker uses a dipstick to check water levels and temperatures in a series of tanks for a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. gas drilling site outside Rifle, Colo. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” can greatly increase the productivity of an oil or gas well by splitting open rock with water pumped underground at high pressure. The process typically requires several million gallons of water per well. In western Colorado, Encana says it goes to great lenghts to recycle over 95 percent of the water it uses for fracking to save money and limit use of local water supplies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013, photo, workers adjust piping during a short pause in water pumping during a natural gas hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. drilling site outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The first experimental use of hydraulic fracturing was in 1947, and more than 1 million U.S. oil and gas wells have been fracked since, according to the American Petroleum Institute. The National Petroleum Council estimates up to 80 percent of natural gas wells drilled in the next decade will require hydraulic fracturing. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker uses a headset and microphone to communicate with coworkers over the din of pump trucks, at the site of a natural gas hydraulic fracturing and extraction operation run by the Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The technique of hydraulic fracturing is used to increase or restore the rate at which fluids, such as petroleum, water, or natural gas can be recovered from subterranean natural reservoirs. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, workers tend to a well head during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. gas well outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The first experimental hydraulic fracturing occurred in 1947. More than 1 million U.S. oil and gas wells have been fracked since, according to the American Petroleum Institute. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • This March 29, 2013 photo shows a typical hydraulic fracturing operation at a site outside Rifle, in western Colorado. In the background, a battery of yellow tanks hold water for the job at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. gas well. Pump trucks are parked in front of the tanks. Workers control the flow of water, sand and chemicals into the well heads, left, from an operations trailer, center far right. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” raises concern among some that the chemicals used and hydrocarbons released can contaminate groundwater. Industry officials say an absence of documented, widespread problems with fracking proves the process is safe. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, workers stand atop water tanks while they help keep an eye on water pressure and temperature at a hydraulic fracturing operation run by Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. The first experimental use of hydraulic fracturing was in 1947 followed by the first commercially successful applications in 1949. More than 1 million U.S. oil and gas wells have been fracked since, according to the American Petroleum Institute. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker switches well heads during a short pause in the water pumping phase, at the site of a natural gas hydraulic fracturing and extraction operation run by Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc., outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Proponents of hydraulic fracturing point to the economic benefits from vast amounts of formerly inaccessible hydrocarbons the process can extract. Opponents point to potential environmental impacts, with some critics acknowledging that some fracking operations are far cleaner than others. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker helps monitor water pumping pressure and temperature, at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. hydraulic fracturing and extraction site, outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," occurs after oil and gas wells are drilled and frequently in between drilling phases. The process uses millions of gallons of water mixed with smaller amounts of fine sand and chemicals to split open oil- and gas-bearing rock often located more than a mile underground. Fracking typically occurs in conjunction with other modern drilling techniques, such as directional drilling. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013, photo, a worker uses hand signals to communicate with a co-worker over the sound of massive pumps at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. hydraulic fracturing and extraction site, outside Rifle, in western Colorado. Millions of gallons of water are pumped down well holes to split open oil- and gas-bearing formations in the hydraulic fracturing process. Much of the water used at this site was being recycled to save money and avoid wasting precious local water supplies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • In this March 29, 2013 photo, a worker checks a dipstick to check water levels and temperatures in a series of tanks at an Encana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. hydraulic fracturing operation at a gas drilling site outside Rifle, Colorado. Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” can greatly increase the productivity of an oil or gas well by splitting open rock with water, fine sand and lubricants pumped underground at high pressure. Companies typically need several million gallons of water to frack a single well. In western Colorado, Encana says it recycles over 95 percent of the water it uses for fracking to save money and limit use of local water supplies. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)