Recent studies have shown that the number of women taking their husbands' last name after marriage is on the rise. A new survey of Facebook users hints at just how many women are choosing to give up their maiden names.

In partnership with The Daily Beast, Facebook looked at the names of 14 million married females, ranging in age from 20 to 79 who are currently active on Facebook and married in the United States, according to a report on The Daily Beast Thursday. Facebook determined that of that group, 65 percent of women in their 20s and 30s changed their names.

Even more women in their their 40s, 50s, and 60s changed their names -- 68 percent, 75 percent and 80 percent, respectively.

The study did not account for women who changed their names on Facebook but not legally, and vice versa.

A longitudinal study published in 2009 found a decline in women keeping their maiden names, starting in the 1990s. In a recent survey by HuffPost Weddings and YouGov, 61 percent of people surveyed said that women should take their husbands' name.

Read more results from the YouGov survey in the slideshow below.

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  • Of all respondents surveyed, 61 percent said a woman should take her husband's last name after marriage.<br>

  • Of Republicans surveyed, 81 percent said a woman should take her husband's last name after marriage.<br> Of Democrats surveyed, 60 percent agreed.<br> Fifty-one percent of independents surveyed agreed.

  • Among Caucasians, 60 percent said a woman should take her husband's last name; 58 percent of Hispanics agreed; and of African Americans surveyed, 71 percent agreed.

  • Of all respondents surveyed, less than half said a man should be <em>allowed</em> to take his wife's last name after marriage. Thirty-four percent said he <em>should not</em> be allowed, with 18 percent undecided

  • Fifty-three percent of Republicans said that a man <em>should not be allowed</em> to take his wife's last name after marriage; just 30 percent said a man should be allowed. Of Democrats surveyed, 56 percent said a man should be allowed to take his wife's last name.

  • Thirty-nine percent of respondents said hyphenation is "a good way [for couples] to show they respect each other", while 38 percent said hyphenation is "a silly piece of political correctness."

  • By a 46 percent to 30 percent margin, women said hyphenation is "a good way [for couples] to show they respect each other. Conversely, a 47 percent to 32 percent margin of men said hyphenation is a "silly piece of political correctness."

  • Of Democrats surveyed, 53 percent said hyphenation is a good way to show respect. Of Republicans surveyed, 58 percent said it's a silly piece of political correctness (just 22 percent said it's a good way to show respect).

  • Of Caucasians surveyed, 34 percent said hyphenation is a good way to show respect, while 41 percent said it's a silly piece of political correctness.<br> Of African Americans surveyed, 60 percent said it's a good way to show respect, while just 21 percent said it's a silly piece of political correctness.

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