LONDON (Reuters) - Two microscope slides bearing the blood of former Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi are to go on sale in London on Tuesday and are expected to fetch from 10,000 pounds to 15,000 pounds ($15,200-$22,800).

The slides were obtained in 1924 when the father of the Indian independence movement was recovering from an appendectomy near Mumbai. He was thought to have donated the blood to the family he was staying with at the time.

"To Gandhi devotees, it has the same status as a sacred relic to a Christian," said Richard Westwood-Brookes, a historical documents expert at Mullock's auctioneers which is selling the item.

"It is an artefact which is revered by disciples of Gandhi, particularly in India and therefore that is the sort of person who would go for it," he added.

The slides are part of a larger collection of items obtained by Mullock's, which include the former leader's sandals, shawl and bed linen.

Demand for Gandhi memorabilia has been steadily growing since Mullock's sold soil samples and blades of bloody grass purportedly from the spot where Gandhi was assassinated in 1948, for 10,000 pounds ($15,200) last year.

($1 = 0.6582 British pounds)

(Reporting by Li-mei Hoang, editing by Paul Casciato)

UPDATE: AP is reporting that Gandhi's blood did not sell at auction as it did not reach the 10,000 pound minimum.

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  • In this combination of ten photos taken Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, Hindu holy men are seen before, top, and after , bottom, they had their heads and faces shaved as part of an initiation ritual where they were to become Naga Sadhus, or naked holy men, at the Maha Kumbh Festival at Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, India. The initiation of new Naga Sadhus can only be performed at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, which occurs once every twelve years and sees millions of devotees converging on the northern Indian city. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)

  • An Indian child dressed as Hindu goddess Parvaty watches a religious procession of sadhus, or Hindu holy men, arriving to participate in the Maha Kumbh Mela at the Sangam, the confluence of rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, india, Friday, Feb. 1, 2013. Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to attend the Maha Kumbh festival, which is one of the world's largest religious gatherings that lasts 55 days and falls every 12 years. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Hindu holy men cheer as they take dips in River Ganges during the Kumbh Mela festival in Haridwar, India, Tuesday, March 30, 2010. Devout Hindus bathe in the Ganges during the months long festival, with the belief that it will cleanse them of their sins and free them from the cycle of life and rebirth. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Hindu devotees seen on the banks of River Ganges for evening rituals, during the Kumbh Mela festival in Haridwar, India, Tuesday, March 30, 2010. Devout Hindus bathe in the Ganges during the months long festival, with the belief that it will cleanse them of their sins and free them from the cycle of life and rebirth. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Indian Hindu priests and devotees perform evening rituals at Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges and Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India,Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to attend the Maha Kumbh festival, which is one of the world's largest religious gatherings that lasts 55 days and falls every 12 years. During the festival pilgrims bathe in the holy Ganges River in a ritual they believe can wash away their sins. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • An Indian Sadhu, or hindu holy man, performs evening rituals at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati River, during the Maha Kumbh Mela, in Allahabad, India, Friday, Jan. 18, 2013. Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to attend the Maha Kumbh festival, which is one of the world's largest religious gatherings that lasts 55 days and falls every 12 years. During the festival pilgrims bathe in the holy Ganges River in a ritual they believe can wash away their sins. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • A Hindu holy man is silhouetted against the setting sun as he performs yoga at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, and Yamuna during the Maha Kumbh Mela, in Allahabad, India, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to attend the Maha Kumbh festival, which is one of the world's largest religious gatherings that lasts 55 days and falls every 12 years. During the festival pilgrims bathe in the holy Ganges River in a ritual they believe can wash away their sins. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • A Hindu holy man performs yoga at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, and Yamuna during the Maha Kumbh Mela, in Allahabad, India, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013. Millions of Hindu pilgrims are expected to attend the Maha Kumbh festival, which is one of the world's largest religious gatherings that lasts 55 days and falls every 12 years. During the festival pilgrims bathe in the holy Ganges River in a ritual they believe can wash away their sins. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Hindu devotees take a holy dip at 'Sangam', the confluence of Hindu holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh festival at Allahabad, India, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Led by heads of monasteries arriving on chariots and ash-smeared naked ascetics, millions of devout Hindus plunged into the frigid waters of the holy Ganges River in India on Sunday in a ritual that they believe will wash away their sins. Sunday was the third of six auspicious bathing days during the Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher Festival, which lasts 55 days and is one of the world's largest religious gatherings. (AP Photo /Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Hindu devotees pray against a setting sun, after a holy dip at 'Sangam', the confluence of Hindu holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh festival at Allahabad, India, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Led by heads of monasteries arriving on chariots and ash-smeared naked ascetics, millions of devout Hindus plunged into the frigid waters of the holy Ganges River in India on Sunday in a ritual that they believe will wash away their sins. Sunday was the third of six auspicious bathing days during the Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher Festival, which lasts 55 days and is one of the world's largest religious gatherings. (AP Photo /Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Hindu devotees walk across pontoon bridges as they leave after a holy dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati River, during the Maha Kumbh festival, in Allahabad, India , Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Led by heads of monasteries arriving on chariots and ash-smeared naked ascetics, millions of devout Hindus plunged into the frigid waters of the holy Ganges River in India on Sunday in a ritual that they believe will wash away their sins. Sunday was the third of six auspicious bathing days during the Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher Festival, which lasts 55 days and is one of the world's largest religious gatherings. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

  • A Hindu devotee prays after a holy dip at 'Sangam', the confluence of Hindu holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh festival at Allahabad, India, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Led by heads of monasteries arriving on chariots and ash-smeared naked ascetics, millions of devout Hindus plunged into the frigid waters of the holy Ganges River in India on Sunday in a ritual that they believe will wash away their sins. Sunday was the third of six auspicious bathing days during the Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher Festival, which lasts 55 days and is one of the world's largest religious gatherings. (AP Photo /Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Thousands of people throng a platform waiting for trains to take them back home after visiting the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. At least ten Hindu pilgrims attending the Kumbh Mela were killed and more then thirty were injured in a stampede on an overcrowded staircase of the Allahabad railway station, according to Railway Ministry sources. (AP Photo/Saurabh Das)

  • Hindu devotees walk across a pontoon bridge as they leave after a holy dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati River, during the Maha Kumbh festival, in Allahabad, India , Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. Millions of devout Hindus plunged into the frigid waters of the holy Ganges River in India on Sunday in a ritual that they believe will wash away their sins. Sunday was the third of six auspicious bathing days during the Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher Festival, which lasts 55 days and is one of the world's largest religious gatherings. (AP Photo /Manish Swarup)

  • In this combination of two photos taken Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, Hindu holy man Baba Vinod poses before, left, and after, right, he had his head and face shaved as part of an initiation ritual where he was to become Naga Sadhu, or naked holy man, at the Maha Kumbh Festival at Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, India. The initiation of new Naga Sadhus can only be performed at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, which occurs once every 12 years and sees millions of devotees converging on the northern Indian city. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • In this combination of two photos taken Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, Hindu holy man Baba Giri poses before, left, and after, right, he had his head and face shaved as part of an initiation ritual where he was to become a Naga Sadhu, or naked holy man, at the Maha Kumbh Festival at Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, India. The initiation of new Naga Sadhus can only be performed at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, which occurs once every twelve years and sees millions of devotees converging on the northern Indian city. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • In this combination of two photos taken Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, Hindu holy man Baba Sanjay poses before, left, and after, right, he had his head and face shaved as part of an initiation ritual where he was to become a Naga Sadhu, or naked holy man, at the Maha Kumbh Festival at Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, India. The initiation of new Naga Sadhus can only be performed at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, which occurs once every 12 years and sees millions of devotees converging on the northern Indian city. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • In this Jan. 14, 2013 file photo, an Indian Hindu child reacts after being taken for a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati River, during the royal bath on Makar Sankranti at the start of the Maha Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)

  • In this combination of two photos taken Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2013, Hindu holy man Baba Ramshwal poses before, left, and after, right, he had his head and face shaved as part of an initiation ritual where he was to become a Naga Sadhu, or naked holy man, at the Maha Kumbh Festival at Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati, in Allahabad, India. The initiation of new Naga Sadhus can only be performed at the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, which occurs once every 12 years and sees millions of devotees converging on the northern Indian city. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • In this Jan. 14, 2013 file photo, an Indian Hindu man jumps up and down in the water as he takes a dip at Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati River, during the royal bath on Makar Sankranti at the start of the Maha Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, India. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer, File)

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