Most Americans would prefer that the U.S. Congress be evenly divided between male and female members, as opposed to the current male majority, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov poll.

According to the new poll, 58 percent of Americans say that, if they could choose, they would prefer a Congress made up of about the same number of men and women. Sixteen percent said they prefer a mostly male Congress, while 9 percent said they would prefer one composed of mostly women.

Among women, 61 percent said that they would prefer an even gender divide in Congress, while 12 percent said they would prefer a mostly female Congress and 11 percent would prefer a mostly male Congress. Men were somewhat more likely to prefer a mostly male to a mostly female Congress, 22 percent to 6 percent, though 55 percent of men said they'd prefer an even divide.

Democrats (67 percent) were more likely than either Independents (55 percent) or Republicans (51 percent) to want a Congress with gender equality. With respondents' gender and party identification taken into account, Republican men were the only group not to show a majority preference for an equal gender divide in Congress. They were about equally divided, 39 percent to 37 percent, between those who said they thought Congress should have about the same number of men and women and those who wanted a mostly male Congress.

By a 45 percent to 27 percent margin, poll respondents were more likely to say that the interests of women are not fairly represented in Congress. Women themselves were especially likely to say that women's interests are not fairly represented (by a 53 percent to 17 percent margin).

Men, on the other hand, were equally divided, with 38 percent saying that women's interests are fairly represented and 36 percent saying that they are not. By a 52 percent to 15 percent margin, Republican men said that women's interests are fairly represented.

Women were about as likely as men to say that Congress represents "the needs and interests of people like you" very or somewhat well -- those saying so constituted a minority of both groups. Overall, only 4 percent of respondents said that Congress represents the needs of "people like you" very well, while 13 percent said it represents them somewhat well, 38 percent said not very well, and 38 percent said not at all well.

Generally speaking, poll respondents were aware that the current Congress has few women. Fifty-three percent of respondents said that less than a quarter of current members of Congress are women, while another 25 percent said that it's less than half. Women make up 18.3 percent of the current Congress, with 20 percent of the Senate and 17.9 percent of the House of Representatives.

The poll was conducted May 28-29 among 1,000 adults using a sample selected from YouGov's opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population. Factors considered include age, race, gender, education, employment, income, marital status, number of children, voter registration, time and location of Internet access, interest in politics, religion and church attendance.

The Huffington Post has teamed up with YouGov to conduct daily opinion polls. You can learn more about this project and take part in YouGov's nationally representative opinion polling.

Clarification: Language has been changed in the headline to reflect that the present survey's results are not being compared to previous surveys.

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  • Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2013 to present (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)

  • Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2013 to present (AP Photo/LM Otero)

  • Deb Fischer (R-Neb.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2013 to present (AP Photo/Dave Weaver)

  • Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2013 to present (AP Photo/Oskar Garcia)

  • Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2013 to present (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

  • Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2011 to present Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) speaks during the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 28, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

  • Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2009 to present Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) attends the 25th annual Brooklyn tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. at BAM Howard Gilman Opera House on January 17, 2011. (Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images)

  • Kay Hagan (D-N.C.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2009 to present Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) speaks during the final day of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena on September 6, 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

  • Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2009 to present Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.) speaks at a luncheon to mark the 36th anniversary of Roe v. Wade on January 27, 2009 in Washington. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

  • Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2007 to present Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) appears at a U.S. Travel Association press conference on May 12, 2011 (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2007 to present Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) holds a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on March 1, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  • Elizabeth Dole (R-N.C.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2003-09 Sen. Elizabeth Dole (R-N.C.) attends hearings in Washington on Dec. 5, 2006. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2002 to present Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) questions witnesses during a hearing on March 29, 2011 in Washington. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  • Jean Carnahan (D-Mo.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2001-02 Sen. Jean Carnahan (D-Mo.) raises her right hand on January 3, 2001 during a swearing in ceremony in Washington. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Newsmakers)

  • Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2001 to present Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) attends the National Clean Energy Summit 2.0 on August 10, 2009 in Las Vegas. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

  • Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2001 to present Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) speaks at a news conference on June 10, 2008 in Washington. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

  • Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 2001-09 Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) speaks to reporters after casting her vote on November 4, 2008 in Chappaqua, New York. (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images)

  • Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1999-2011 Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.) participates in a news conference on Capitol Hill on April 20, 2010 in Washington. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

  • Susan Collins (R-Maine)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1997-present Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill February 1, 2011 in Washington. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

  • Mary Landrieu (D-La.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1997-present Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) holds a list of jobs while talking with reporters at the U.S. Capitol on September 20, 2011 in Washington. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  • Sheila Frahm (R-Kan.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1996 Kansas Republican Senator-designate Sheila Frahm gestures during an interview on Capitol Hill Monday June 10, 1996. (AP Photo/John Duricka)

  • Olympia Snowe (R-Maine)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1995-present Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) speaks at the 32nd Annual Women's Campaign Fund Parties of Your Choice Gala on April 2, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for Women's Campaign Fund)

  • Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1993-present Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) speaks to reporters on November 30, 2011 at Capitol Hill in Washington. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Patty Murray (D-Wash.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1993-present Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) speaks during day two of the Democratic National Convention on September 5, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

  • Carol Moseley Braun (D-Ill.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1993-99 Carol Mosley Braun (D-Ill.), the first African-American woman U.S. senator, listens on Jan. 19, 1993 to Zoe Baird, U.S. President-elect Bill Clinton's nominee for U.S. Attorney General. (LUKE FRAZZA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1993-present Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) speaks during a September 28, 2010 hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

  • Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1992-present Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) takes the stage during day two of the Democratic National Convention on September 5, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

  • Jocelyn Burdick (D-N.D.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1992 Sen. Jocelyn Burdick (D-N.D., far left), looks on as Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., re-enacts taking the Senatorial oath on Dec. 15, 1992. (AP Photo/John Duricka)

  • Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1987-present Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) speaks on day two of the Democratic National Convention on Sept. 5, 2012 in Charlotte, N.C. (STAN HONDA/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Paula Hawkins (R-Fla.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1981-87 Florida Gov. Bob Graham, the Democratic challenger for the state's U.S. Senate seat, listens as incumbent Republican Sen. Paula Hawkins makes a point during their Oct. 20, 1986 debate. (AP Photo/Ray Fairall)

  • Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1978-97 Sen. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.) photographed in her office in Wichita, Kansas on Dec. 18, 1978. (AP PhotoJohn P. Filo)

  • Maryon Allen (D-Ala.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1978 Sen. Maryon Allen (D-Ala.) pictured on June 23, 1978. (AP Photo/Croft)

  • Muriel Humphrey (D-Minn.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1978 Muriel Humphrey sits at a desk in the Senate Office Building, vacated by the death of her husband, Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey. She was named by Minnesota Gov. Rudy Perpich to fill his seat and sworn in February 1978. (AP Photo/Peter Bregg)

  • Elaine S. Edwards (D-La.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1972

  • Maurine Brown Neuberger (D-Ore.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1960-67 Sen. Maurine Neuberger (D-Ore.) poses on March 19, 1963 in Washington. (AP Photo/hlg)

  • Hazel Hempel Abel (R-Neb.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1954 A portrait of Sen. Hazel Hempel Abel (1888 - 1966). (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

  • Eva Kelley Bowring (R-Neb.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1954

  • Margaret Chase Smith (R-Maine)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1949-73 Sen. Margaret Chase Smith (R-Maine) smiles on Jan., 5, 1949 in her Washington office. (AP Photo)

  • Vera Cahalan Bushfield (R-S.D.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1948

  • Gladys Pyle (R-S.D.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1938-39

  • Dixie Bibb Graves (D-Ala.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1937-1938

  • Rose McConnell Long (D-La.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1936-37 Rose McConnell Long walks to work with Sen. Hattie Caraway, right, in Washington, April 20, 1936. She filled the unexpired term of her late husband, Huey P. Long. (AP Photo)

  • Hattie Wyatt Caraway (D-Ark.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1931-45 Sen. Hattie Wyatt Caraway (D-Ark.), photographed in her Washington office on Oct. 22, 1942. She became the first female U.S. senator in 1933. (AP Photo/William J. Smith)

  • Rebecca Latimer Felton (D-Ga.)

    <a href="http://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/women_senators.htm"><strong>Served from:</strong></a> 1922 Rebecca Latimer Felton was the first woman to ever serve in the U.S. Senate. She was appointed by the state of Georgia to fill Sen. Tom Watson's place after his death. (AP Photo)