ANKARA, Turkey — Turkish authorities are investigating people who allegedly insulted state officials or incited riots on social media, the deputy prime minister said Thursday, in a sign the government is intent on meting out punishment over the massive protests that swept the country in June.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has faced tough international criticism over his government's heavy-handed crackdown on the unprecedented demonstrations. But in a possible attempt to soften the blow to the country's democratic reputation, his deputy also said the government would propose further checks on the country's historically powerful military.

The Aksam newspaper said police had provided to Istanbul prosecutors a list of 35 names of people who had allegedly insulted Erdogan or other officials on Twitter or Facebook. Deputy Prime Minister Bekir Bozdag acknowledged the probe, but would not confirm the list. It was not clear exactly what the posts said.

Meanwhile, Facebook expressed concerned about Turkish proposals that would require Internet companies to provide user information to authorities.

Erdogan earlier this month branded Twitter a social "menace" for spreading lies after many people turned to the social networking site and Facebook for information. Many Turkish media outlets provided little coverage in the early stages of the demonstrations, likely intimidated into self-censorship by the government's previously tough approach to journalists.

Nearly three weeks of protests were sparked by a violent police crackdown on peaceful activists on May 31, with thousands expressing discontent over what they say are Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian ways. Erdogan who has shepherded Turkey to an economic boom and raised the country's international profile, rejects the charge and cites his broad support base.

The government has dismissed protesters' general calls for a more pluralistic society and has blamed the protests on a foreign-led conspiracy involving bankers and the media meant to stop Turkey on its tracks. It has also vowed to go after them.

Bozdag took aim at the social media users under investigation, claiming that there were many "profanities and insults conducted electronically" that were against the law. Turkish law bars insults to public figures.

"Crimes determined as such by the law don't change if they are carried out through Facebook, Twitter or through other electronic means," Bozdag said. "No one has the right to commit crimes under the rule of law."

On Wednesday, Turkey's transport and communications minister complained that Twitter was not cooperating with authorities and said the company has been asked to appoint a Turkey-based official to deal with requests.

Binali Yildirim suggested Facebook was more cooperative, but the company released a statement saying it had not provided user data to Turkish authorities in relation to the protests and was concerned about proposals that would require Internet companies to share information.

"We will be meeting with representatives of the Turkish government when they visit Silicon Valley this week, and we intend to communicate our strong concerns about these proposals directly at that time," Facebook said.

Human rights groups say dozens of people have been arrested and face trial for their involvement in the protests, which resulted in at least four deaths and thousands of injuries – including 11 who lost eyes or their eyesight from tear gas canisters fired by police.

But even as the government took a hard line on social media, it appeared to be trying to make some amends. Though the European Union decided to revive long-dormant EU membership talks with Turkey this week, it said it would delay them until later this year, citing the government's heavy-handed crackdown on the protests.

Bozdag said Parliament will consider a government-proposed proposal that would amend a regulation that the army has cited in the past as grounds for takeovers or interference in politics. It stipulates that it is the military's duty "to watch over and protect the Turkish Republic."

The Turkish military has frequently intervened in politics in the past, and has staged three coups.

Though new democratic proposal came out of the blue, Erdogan has been at odds with the military for much of his 10 years in office. He has enacted reforms over the years that have curbed the powers of the military, winning him praise for strengthening democracy.

Earlier, this week, the government had also said it was considering a set of measures that would grant greater religious rights to the country's Alevi Muslim community – who have faced discrimination in Turkey.

Related on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Turkish protesters clash with Turkish riot policemen on Taksim square in Istanbul on June 22, 2013. Turkish police used water cannon today to disperse thousands of demonstrators who had gathered anew in Istanbul's Taksim Square, calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Protesters hold up their hands as they gather on Taksim square before clashes with Turkish riot police in Istanbul on June 22, 2013 during a wave of new protests. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Protesters hold up their hands as they gather on Taksim square before clashing with Turkish riot police in Istanbul on June 22, 2013. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A man bleeds from a head wound as Turkish police clash with anti-government protestors while they clear Taksim Square and push them down the Istikhlal shopping avenue on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • A man braces against a shield as Turkish police clash with anti-government protestors while they clear Taksim Square and push them down the Istikhlal shopping avenue on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • An anti goverment protestor waves a Turkish flag with a portrait of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of modern Turkey on Taksim square during the clash between riot Police and protestors in Istanbul on June 22, 2013. (OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Protesters raise their hands as they gather on Taksim square during the clash between riot police and protestors in Istanbul on June 22, 2013. (OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cyclists ride bikes during the silent protest at Taksim Square on June 23, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. Performance artist Erdem Gunduz, nicknamed 'The Standing Man,' became a new symbol of the anti-government protests after a eight-hour vigil in Taksim Square. (Photo by Burak Kara/Getty Images)

  • Turkish anti-government protestors gather in Taksim Square carrying carnations to mark the four people killed in weeks of protest on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • Turkish anti-government protestors push back on a police car, carnations sitting to mark the four people killed in weeks of protest, as police move into clear Taksim Square in Istanbul, on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • Turkish anti-government protestors gather in Taksim Square carrying carnations to mark the four people killed in weeks of protest on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • Turkish riot police argue with anti-government protestors as they begin moving in to clear Taksim Square, on June 22, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Scott Peterson/Getty Images)

  • People stand during a silent protest at Taksim Square on June 23, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. Performance artist Erdem Gunduz, nicknamed 'The Standing Man,' became a new symbol of the anti-government protests after a eight-hour vigil in Taksim Square. (Photo by Burak Kara/Getty Images)

  • People stand during a silent protest at Taksim Square on June 23, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. Performance artist Erdem Gunduz, nicknamed 'The Standing Man,' became a new symbol of the anti-government protests after a eight-hour vigil in Taksim Square. (Photo by Burak Kara/Getty Images)

  • A protester reacts in pain to a salvo of tear gas fired by Turkish riot police officers to chase out demonstrators and to dismantle the tent camp set up by demonstrators in Gezi Park in Istanbul on June 15, 2013. (MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • People light candles for the victims of the protests at Taksim square, in Istanbul, early Saturday, June 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

  • Protesters try to resist the advance of riot police in Gezi park in Istanbul, Turkey, Saturday, June 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

  • A protester reacts as police throw tear gas among tents during an operation to evacuate the Gezi Park of Taksim Square in Istanbul, Saturday, June 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

  • Police enter to evacuate the Gezi Park in Istanbul, Saturday, June 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

  • Protesters try to resist the advance of riot police in Gezi park in Istanbul, Turkey, Saturday, June 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

  • People march from Anatolian side to European side to Taksim square in Istanbul, on June 16, 2013. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Protesters take cover from a water cannon during clashes with riot police at a demonstration in Ankara on June 16, 2013. (ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A pretzel vendor walks in front of a line of Turkish police cordoning off Taksim Square, in Istanbul, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

  • A protester reacts as Turkish riot police spray water cannon at demonstrators who remained defiant after authorities evicted activists from an Istanbul park, making clear they are taking a hardline against attempts to rekindle protests that have shaken the country, in city's main Kizilay Square in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

  • As police vehicles rolled into Kizilay Square, one woman approached a lightly armored truck bearing the logo of the police anti-terrorism department and grabbed a side window to ask those inside: "What is this oppression? Have you no fear of God? I have no children, but all of these (demonstrators) are my children!" she said, motioning to the young protesters nearby, in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

  • A protester reacts as Turkish riot police spray water cannon at demonstrators who remained defiant after authorities evicted activists from an Istanbul park, making clear they are taking a hardline against attempts to rekindle protests that have shaken the country, in city's main Kizilay Square in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

  • In this Saturday, June 15, 2013, file photo, protesters try to resist the advance of riot police in Gezi park in Istanbul, Turkey. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)

  • Turkish protesters hold a massive rally on John F. Kennedy street near the U.S. Embassy, shouting slogans such as "government, resign!" in Ankara, Turkey, early Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

  • In this Tuesday, June 11, 2013, file photo, a protester tries to remain standing as a police water cannon fires water during clashes in Taksim square in Istanbul. (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis, File)

  • In this Tuesday, June 11, 2013, file photo, a protester tries protect from water projected by a water canon from police during clashes in Taksim square in Istanbul. (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis)

  • People carry the coffin of Ethem Sarisuluk, one of five people killed during the recent protests in Turkey, as Turkish riot police spray water cannon at demonstrators who remained defiant after authorities evicted activists from an Istanbul park, making clear they are taking a hardline against attempts to rekindle protests that have shaken the country, in city's main Kizilay Square in Ankara, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013. (AP Photo )

  • Police fire tear gas as riot police spray water cannon at demonstrators who remained defiant after authorities evicted activists from an Istanbul park, making clear they are taking a hardline against attempts to rekindle protests that have shaken the country, near city's main Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, Sunday, June 16, 2013.(AP Photo )

  • Anti-government protesters demonstrate in central Ankara on June 17, 2013. (ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Anti-government protesters demonstrate in central Ankara on June 17, 2013. (ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • People walk during a rally by the labor unions in Istanbul, Turkey, Monday, June 17, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • People shout anti-government slogans during a rally by the labor unions in Istanbul, Turkey, Monday, June 17, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • Erdem Gunduz, right, stands silently on Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, early Tuesday, June 18, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • A protester stands in a silent protest at Taksim Square in, Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday, June 18, 2013. After weeks of sometimes-violent confrontation with police, Turkish protesters have found a new form of resistance: standing still and silent. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

  • Mert Solkiran, centre, stands in a silent protest at Taksim Square in, Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday, June 18, 2013. After weeks of sometimes-violent confrontation with police, Turkish protesters have found a new form of resistance: standing still and silent. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

  • Erdem Gunduz, left, and dozens of people stand silently on Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, early Tuesday, June 18, 2013. After weeks of confrontation with police, sometimes violent, Turkish protesters are using a new form of resistance: standing silently. The development started late Monday when a solitary man began standing in passive defiance against Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan's authority at Istanbul's central Taksim Square. The square has been sealed off from mass protests since police cleared it over the weekend. The man has identified himself as Erdem Gunduz, a performance artist. His act has sparked imitation by others in Istanbul and other cities. It has provoked widespread comment on social media. (AP Photo)

  • Protestors stand in a silent protest at Taksim Square in, Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday, June 18, 2013. After weeks of sometimes-violent confrontation with police, Turkish protesters have found a new form of resistance: standing still and silent. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

  • A man sleeps at Taksim's Gezi Park early on June 12, 2013 in Istanbul, hours after riot police invated the square. (ANGELOS TZORTZINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Demonstrators wait at the entrance of Taksim Gezi park on June 12, 2013. (GURCAN OZTURK/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Turkish lawyers march in support of anti-government protests in Ankara, on June 12, 2013. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Demonstrators wait at the entrance of the Taksim Gezi park on June 12, 2013 after a night of running battles with riot police as Turkish Prime Minister moved to crush mass demos against his Islamic-rooted government. (GURCAN OZTURK/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Lawyers and members of the Turkish bar association shout slogans as they march in support of anti-government protests in Ankara, on June 12, 2013. (STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Turkish lawyers march in support of anti-government protests in Ankara, on June 12, 2013. (AFP/Getty Images)

  • Riot police fire tear gas to disperse the crowd during a demonstration near Taksim Square on June 11, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images)

  • Protesters clash with riot police at Taksim square in Istanbul on June 11, 2013. (ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Riot police fire tear gas to disperse the crowd during a demonstration near Taksim Square on June 11, 2013 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Photo by Lam Yik Fei/Getty Images)

  • An injured person is helped by fellow protesters during clashes with police on Taksim square in Istanbul, on June 11, 2013. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)