BLACK VOICES

Black Voices Breakthrough Theater: 'Chains' (VIDEO, POLL)

06/28/2013 02:06 pm ET | Updated Jul 08, 2013

Black Voices Breakthrough Theater, part of our Screening Room experience, is a ten part series where our panel of curators present new, short films and web series created by emerging talent --both on screen and behind the camera.

Would you risk your life to grow a flower? Chain thirsts to find beauty in her barren underground community. With the support of her lover, Fric, she risks punishment of death and grows a flower.

SHARON LEWIS’ talent successfully criss-crosses the genre of television, film, digital, print and theatre in a variety of roles as an award winning director, actor, producer and writer. Sharon began work in the arts as an actor, she landed the title role in the Cannes nominated film, “RUDE,” the first all Black above the line Canadian feature film. She continued to work in film and television as an actor but also moved into directing theatre. She co-wrote, directed and produced the 1994 smash hit play, “Sistahs.” The play sold out for weeks, had two extensions and was the recipient of a NFB screenplay adaptation award and was published in 2000. Sharon married her political activist background with her on camera experience and garnered the highest ratings for hosting the CBC live political talk show, “counterSpin” in the history of that show. She is the first woman of color in Canada to host a national prime time talk show. She is a Leo and Gemini nominated television host for ZeD an interactive television and web CBC show. In 2005 Sharon decided to hone her skills behind the camera as a director and went on to win the best Sci-Fi short for Chains at the Eugene International Film Festival. Chains, which she directed, produced and wrote was then bought by HBO USA, CBC Reflections and then played at the prestigious Chicago Film Festival in 2010.

Check out “Chains” (above) and be sure to vote for your favorite Black Voices' Break Through theater film in the poll (below).

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