POLITICS

Antonin Scalia: Holocaust Was Partially Brought About By Judicial Activism (REPORT)

07/21/2013 03:43 pm ET | Updated Jul 22, 2013

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's warnings on judicial activism appear to have gained a new chapter at the Utah Bar Association's 2013 summer convention.

The Aspen Times reported Sunday that Scalia drew upon the Holocaust as an example of how judicial activism can lead to problems. According to the Utah Bar Association's website, Scalia was slated to be the keynote speaker for the 2013 Summer Convention event, which was held from July 17-20 in Snowmass, Colo.

Scalia opened his talk with a reference to the Holocaust, which happened to occur in a society that was, at the time, “the most advanced country in the world.” One of the many mistakes that Germany made in the 1930s was that judges began to interpret the law in ways that reflected “the spirit of the age.” When judges accept this sort of moral authority, as Scalia claims they’re doing now in the U.S., they get themselves and society into trouble.

About a month ago, Scalia delivered a speech to the North Carolina Bar Association, stressing his concern about how moralist judges are growing more prevalent. He classifies the Constitution as a legal document -- not a living document -- that has laws of the land serve as a guide to interpreting changing circumstances.

"We have become addicted to abstract moralizing," Scalia said last month. "I am questioning the sanity of having value-laden judgments made by judges."

Were you at the Utah Bar Association event? Have more information on Scalia's speech? Email us at offthebus@huffingtonpost.com.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated that Scalia views the Constitution as a living document.

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