Huffpost Technology

The 3D-Printed Rifle, Grizzly 2.0, Is Getting Stronger By The Week

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So far, the Grizzly's growl is worse than its bite, but that may soon change.

The second version of the 3D-printed rifle, the Grizzly 2.0, was fired for the first time in a video released Friday, and this time it lasted 14 rounds before a crack formed. Even though the rifle is made almost entirely of 3D-printed plastic, the updated Grizzly shoots regular Winchester bullets.

The rifle was made by a Canadian man who goes by "Matthew," The Verge reported. He's the same person behind the last 3D-printed rifle, which broke after just one firing two weeks ago.

"Matthew" used a string to fire the original Grizzly from afar as a safety precaution, but eventually fired the Grizzly 2.0 by hand like a normal rifle.

Even though the Grizzly doesn't look too threatening right now, it's impressive and terrifying how quickly these improvements have been made. 3D-printed guns can be built entirely in one's home without a license, and the more advanced the guns get, the more dangerous 3D printing becomes. Many of the guns contain little to no metal, so they may be able to get through metal detectors without being discovered.

The 3D-printing enthusiast behind this YouTube account has certainly gone in a different direction since one of his first projects: a 3D-printed ukulele. Maybe he should stick to musical instruments and relieve us of the stress these guns are causing.

[ThreeD Ukulele via The Verge]

Earlier on HuffPost:

Creative Uses For 3D Printing
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