Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the most famous reporters in the history of the Washington Post, weighed in on the paper's sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos on Monday.

The two, along with editor Ben Bradlee and publisher Katharine Graham, are synonymous with the glory days of the Post for their storied Watergate reporting.

Both men said they were sad that the Graham family dynasty has come to an end at the paper.

"It's very sad," Woodward told the Daily Beast.

"On a very personal level, there is obviously a lot of sentiment at this moment--appropriate sadness, for sure," Bernstein said in a statement sent to the Wall Street Journal.

But Woodward and Bernstein also professed optimism about the Post's future in the hands of the tech billionaire.

"If there's somebody who can succeed, it's Bezos," Woodward said. "He's the innovator, he's got the money and the patience, so we'll see. I think in some ways, this may be the Post's last chance to survive, at least in some form of what it was."

Bernstein said he had "high hopes" about Bezos.

"Jeff Bezos seems to me exactly the kind of inventive and innovative choice needed to bring about a recommitment to great journalism on the scale many of us have been hoping for--while employing all the applicable tools and best sensibilities of a new era and the old," he wrote.

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  • FILE - In this May 7, 1973, file photo, reporters Bob Woodward, right, and Carl Bernstein, whose reporting of the Watergate case won them a Pulitzer Prize, sit in the newsroom of the Washington Post in Washington. On Monday, Aug. 5, 2013, the Washington Post announced the paper has been sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. One of key dates in the history of The Washington Post was when the Post began reporting on the break-in at the Democratic National Committee's offices at Washington's Watergate hotel. (AP Photo)

  • Amazon's Jeff Bezos To Buy The Washington Post For 250 Million

    WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 05: A woman leaves the Washington Post building after the announced sale of the newspaper August 5, 2013 in Washington, DC. The Graham family has agreed to sell the flagship newspaper for $250 million to Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 28, 1966, file photo, writer Truman Capote,left, and guest of honor Katharine Graham arrive at Capote's Black and White Ball at the Plaza Hotel in New York. Graham is president of the Washington Post Company and Newsweek magazine. On Monday, Aug. 5, 2013, the Washington Post announced the paper has been sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. One of key dates in the history of The Washington Post was when Katharine Graham succeed Phillip Graham as publisher after his suicide in 1963. (AP Photo/David Pickoff, File)

  • WASHINGTON POST

    Chart shows the stock price of the Washington Post Company; 1c x 3 inches; 46.5 mm x 76 mm;

  • Katharine Graham of the Washington Post

    WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 31: Katharine Graham in front of a montage in the Washington Post's lobby. (Photo by Ken Feil/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • The National Portrait Gallery honors Washington Post's Katharine Graham in their new exhibition in Washington, DC.

    WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 30: The National Portrait Gallery honors the Washington Post's Katharine Graham with personal photos such as this shot of her wearing a mask with Truman Capote, right, in their new exhibition September, 30, 2010 in Washington, DC. -- original photo courtesy Estate of Katharine Graham (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • Katharine Graham addresses the staff in The Washington Post Newsroom.

    WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 1975: FILE - Katharine Graham speaks to newsroom employees shortly after the beginning of the pressman's strike against the newspaper in October, 1975. (Photo by Linda Wheeler/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • Ben Bradlee and Katharine Graham of the Washington Post

    WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 30: Katharine Graham, publisher of the Washington Post, and Executive Editor Benjamin C. Bradlee look over reports of the 6 to 3 Supreme Court decision which permitted the paper to publish stories based on the secret Pentagon study of the Vietnam War. (Photo by Charles del Vecchio/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • Ben Bradlee and Meg Greenfield listen to a statement read by Katharine Graham

    WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 10: Listening to a statement being read by Katharine Graham on the situation with the striking Washington Post pressmen are Ben Bradlee, executive executive editor, and Meg Greenfield, deputy editorial page editor of TWP. (File Photo/The Washington Post via Getty Images

  • GRAHAM JOHNSON BRADLEE

    FILE - In this May 22, 2001, file photo, CNN chairman and CEO Tom Johnson, left, joined at right by retired Washington Post Executive Editor Ben Bradlee talk with Katharine Graham, chairman of the Washington Post Company at a Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press dinner in New York. On Monday, Aug. 5, 2013, the Washington Post announced the paper has been sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. One of key dates in the history of The Washington Post was when Graham died at age 84 in 2001. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

  • FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2008, file photo, The Washington Post sign is seen on its building in Washington. On Monday, Aug. 5, 2013, the Washington Post announced the paper has been sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

  • DIANA CLINTON LAUREN GRAHAM

    FILE - In this Sept. 24, 1996 file photo, First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, second from left, hosts, from left, designer Ralph Lauren, Katharine Graham, chairman of the board, The Washington Post Company, and Princess Diana during a breakfast at the White House in recognition of the Nina Hyde Center for Breast Cancer Research. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)

  • GRAHAM CHIRAC SULZBERGER

    FILE - In this May 26, 1992 file photo, Paris Mayor Jacques Chirac, poses for a photo while flanked by Washington Post Company President Katharine Graham, left, and New York Times Company President Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, after awarding them the Paris City Medal, in Paris. Sulzberger has died at age 86. The newspaper reports that his family says Sulzberger died Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, at his home in Southampton, N.Y., after a long illness. He had retired in 1992 after three decades at the paper's helm and was succeeded by his son, Arthur Jr. (AP Photo/Jose Goita)

  • Ben Bradlee (R), former executive editor of the Wa

    WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 23: Ben Bradlee (R), former executive editor of the Washington Post wipes his eyes as his wife, Post writer Sally Quinn stands by during funeral services 23 July, 2001 for Washington Post publisher and CEO Katharine Graham at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. Katharine Graham died 17 July from head injuries suffered in a fall outside a condominium in Sun Valley, Idaho. (Photo credit should read BILL O'LEARY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Donald Graham and Elizabeth (Lally) Weymouth

    WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 23: Donald Graham and Elizabeth (Lally) Weymouth during the funeral service for their mother Katharine Graham at Washington's National Cathedral. (Photo by Rich Lipski/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • Newspaper Production At The Washington Post Co. Printing Facility

    Unused newspaper boxes sit near the Washington Post newspaper production facility in Springfield, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, July 12, 2013. The Washington Post began publishing on Thursday, Dec. 6, 1877, and had a circulation of 10,000. The newspaper contained four pages and cost three cents a copy. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

  • Newspaper Production At The Washington Post Co. Printing Facility

    The arts section of the Washington Post travels on a conveyor inside the control room of the Post's newspaper production facility in Springfield, Virginia, U.S., on Friday, July 12, 2013. The Washington Post began publishing on Thursday, Dec. 6, 1877, and had a circulation of 10,000. The newspaper contained four pages and cost three cents a copy. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images