John B. Sparks' 1931 Histomap charting 4,000 years of human history has been making the rounds on the Internet for the last couple days, providing an overview of human civilization since 2,000 BC in a colorful and impressively-designed chart by Rand McNally.

Sparks also created histomaps of the history of religion and evolution, and "The Histomap of Religion: The Story of Man's Search For Spiritual Unity," can be yours for $275 on Ebay. But what's $275 when you can hold 100,000 years of religious history in your hands?

mark basseley youssef

The design of the map depicts the tidal nature of religious belief as the bands narrow and widen in response to the times. Though by no means perfectly accurate, the chart's historical simplification is nonetheless compelling as it allows readers to track the rise, fall, assimilation, and genesis of faith groups.

The foreword to the chart begins with the interfaith quote:

"All Faith is false, all Faith is true:

Truth is the shattered mirror strown

In myriad bits; while each believes

his little bit the whole to own."

from The Kasiday of Haji Abdu el-Yezdi
by Sir Richard Francis Burton

Published in 1947 and originally sold for a mere $1.50, the kitschy chart could probably use an update, as religious movements that have sprung up since 1950 include Scientology, the Church of Satan, Kopimism, and the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.

Bidding ends on August 19th, folks.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Nash Papyrus

    The Nash Papyrus is a second-century B.C.E. fragment containing the text of the Ten Commandments followed by the <em>Shema</em> prayer. Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls it was the oldest known manuscript containing a text from the Hebrew Bible. The manuscript was originally identified as a lectionary used in liturgical contexts, due to the juxtaposition of the Decalogue (probably reflecting a mixed tradition, a composite of Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5) with the Shema (Deuteronomy 6:4-5), and it has been suggested that it is, in fact, from a phylactery (<em>tefillin</em>, used in daily prayer). <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Part of prayer book according to the Ashkenazi rite, containing prayers for weekdays, Sabbaths, High Holy days and Pilgrim Festivals. This page depicts Moses presenting the Two Tablets to the people of Israel at Mount Sinai. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Abraham is depicted in the Book of Deer, a Gospel Book written in a hand that was current in the period c. 850-1000 and generally dated to the first half of the 10th century. The manuscript belongs to the category of "Irish pocket Gospel Books," produced for private use rather than for church services. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/christian">Christian Works</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • This "elaborately-painted picture of a Buddha holding a flower in a vase on his clasped hands" is part of a sutra containing a dialogue between the Buddha and Mañjuśrī. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/sanskrit">Sanskrit Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Medical Tract

    This beautifully-illuminated page is part of a medical tract, in five parts, dealing mainly with medicine and pharmacology, but with excurses on astronomy (astrology) and divination. The handwriting is Italian, of the 15th century. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Part of an illuminated Quran presented to the University of Cambridge in 1806. The text of the Quran is followed by some prayers, and a Fal-nāmah. The manuscript is not dated, but dates of ownership of 1028 A.H./1618 C.E. and 1066 A.H./1655 C.E. occur at the beginning. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/islamic">Islamic Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Part of the final redaction (1249-50) of the commentary on Apocalypse by Franciscan Alexander of Bremen, who composed this commentary in the light of eschatological beliefs associated with Joachim of Fiore, resulting in imagery where Roman emperors ride Apocalyptic horses, heresiarchs blow trumpets, two-headed angels stand for popes or kings, and the Beast personifies various historical figures. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/christian">Christian Works</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Part of prayer book according to the Ashkenazi rite, containing prayers for weekdays, Sabbaths, High Holy days and Pilgrim Festivals. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Illuminated Hebrew Bible (Pentateuch and Hagiographa) with full Tiberian vocalisation and cantillation. Shown here is a micrographic lion at the end of the book of Daniel. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Part of an illuminated Quran presented to the University of Cambridge in 1806. This is a prayer that follows the Quranic text. The manuscript is not dated, but dates of ownership of 1028 A.H./1618 C.E. and 1066 A.H./1655 C.E. occur at the beginning. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/islamic">Islamic Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • Mishnah

    Part of one of only three complete manuscripts of the Mishnah, and considered to be "an outstanding witness of the western type of Mishnaic Hebrew." <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/hebrew">Hebrew Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • A "Guardian of the Kingdom of God" from a richly illuminated 16th century copy of the Persian version of Qazwini's "The marvels of creation and the oddities of existence," commonly known as "The cosmography of Qazwini." <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/islamic">Islamic Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>

  • A representation of the goddess Mantrānusāraṇī with terrifying figures of yoginīs. <em>From the <a href="http://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/collections/sanskrit">Sanskrit Manuscripts</a> collection of the Cambridge Digital Library.</em>