BOSTON — When the members of the Harvard Business School class of 2013 gathered in May to celebrate the end of their studies, there was little visible evidence of the experiment they had undergone for the last two years. As they stood amid the brick buildings named after businessmen from Morgan to Bloomberg, black-and-crimson caps and gowns united the 905 graduates into one genderless mass.

But during that week’s festivities, the Class Day speaker, a standout female student, alluded to “the frustrations of a group of people who feel ignored.” Others grumbled that another speechmaker, a former chief executive of a company in steep decline, was invited only because she was a woman. At a reception, a male student in tennis whites blurted out, as his friends laughed, that much of what had occurred at the school had “been a painful experience.”

He and his classmates had been unwitting guinea pigs in what would have once sounded like a far-fetched feminist fantasy: What if Harvard Business School gave itself a gender makeover, changing its curriculum, rules and social rituals to foster female success?

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  • 8. Columbia University

    New York, N.Y.

  • 7. University Of California–​Berkeley (Haas)

    Berkeley, Calif.

  • 6. University of Chicago (Booth)

    Chicago, Ill.

  • 4. Northwestern University (Kellogg)

    Evanston, Ill.

  • 4. Massachusetts Institute Of Technology (Sloan)

    Cambridge, Mass.

  • 3. University Of Pennsylvania

    Philadelphia, Penn.

  • 1. Stanford University

    Stanford, Calif.

  • 1. Harvard University

    Cambridge, Mass.