Huffpost Latino Voices

Spanish Speaking Declines Among Latinos, Rises Among Non-Hispanics

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Abhinav Tirath uses a tablet to follow along with his teacher in an eighth grade Spanish class at Autrey Mill Middle School in Johns Creek, Ga. on Thursday, May 9, 2013. The school is part of a pilot project launched this spring by Amplify, News Corp.'s education technology company, which has tablets in the hands of some 2,500 students at 12 schools across the country. (AP Photo/John Bazemore) | AP

It's no secret that more and more people are speaking español in the United States, but what you probably didn't know is that in the future more of those Spanish speakers will not be Hispanic.

That's right -- as immigrant families become more established here, future generations will follow the pattern of previous immigrants from Europe and Asia and stop using their native language.

But at the same time, non-Latinos will be learning Spanish and helping their kids to grow up bilingual because they want to pass on what they learned in school, take advantage of business opportunities or even because they have a Spanish-speaking spouse.

Read the whole story at CNN