From the strange to the creepy to the gross, cities around the world have some bizarre tourist attractions.

Whether you have a love of all things odd or are looking for a break from everyday museums and monuments, these weird attractions are a must-see.

Check out some of the world's most bizarre tourist attractions below!

Yunessun Spa Resort
yunessun spa resort
If you've always wanted to soak in your favorite beverage, a visit to Japan's Hakone Kowakien Yunessun Hot Springs Amusement Park & Spa Resort is in order. Not only can you take a relaxing dip in your run-of-the-mill jacuzzis, but you can bathe in spas filled with sake, green tea, coffee or red wine.

Island Of The Dolls
xochimilco dolls

Mexico's Isla de las Munecas is the perfect combination of creepy and flat-out weird. Dedicated to the lost soul of a young girl (creepy), the island is populated by hundreds of old, decomposing baby dolls hanging from trees (weird) -- the dolls are believed to possess the soul of the dead girl. Go for the frights, and for the story.

Bubblegum Alley
bubblegum alley

Bubblegum Alley is an attraction you can be a part of. The wall of chewed bubblegum in San Luis Obispo, Calif., has been growing since the 1970s. The sticky, colorful wall is a must-see for gum chewers and those who want to ick out their germaphobe travel companions.

Avanos Hair Museum
avanos hair museum

There are some bizarre museums out there, and the Avanos Hair Museum is maybe one of the strangest in the world. A dark cavern that sits below a pottery shop, the "museum" features thousands of locks of hair.

Capuchin Catacombs
capuchin catacombs

Located in Palermo, Italy, the Capuchin Catacombs are bone-chillingly creepy. Eight thousand incredibly well-preserved mummies dressed in their finest garb line the walls of these tombs, which tourists can today stroll through. Many of the bodies are posed -- making them even eerier. Avoid in the event of a zombie apocalypse.

Karni Mata Temple
karni mata temple

Deshnok, India's Karni Mata Temple -- also known as the Temple of Rats -- lives up to its name. The temple is named for the Goddess Karni, who believed her family members would never die, but rather be reincarnated as rats. The temple's rat population is treated as sacred, giving protection to the temple. If you're not a fan of rodents, don't fear -- they're apparently very friendly.

Paris Sewer Museum
paris sewer museum

"Paris has another Paris under herself; a Paris of sewers..." said Victor Hugo in his 1862 novel, Les Miserables, and now you, too, can hang out where the vagrants of yore passed their time. The Paris Sewer Museum takes you beneath the city and is dedicated to exploring the significance of the sewer system. History buffs will enjoy the educational experience, and everyone else will be just slightly weirded out.

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  • Longyearbyen, Norway

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> There is no dying allowed in this remote Arctic town—well, you can die, but you can’t be buried here. You heard that right: no body has been buried in the local cemetery in almost a hundred years. Why? The perpetually frigid temperatures prohibit corpses from properly decomposing. Following the influenza epidemic of 1917, Longyearbyen banned burials in the town’s graveyard. The local polar bear population rivals the human one, and it’s not abnormal for the townspeople to shoot a bear in self-defense (hunting is illegal). Even after a polar bear takes its last breath in this mining town, it must also be sent away for its final resting spot.<br><br> <em>Photo © Marina Gotovchits</em><br>

  • Monowi, NE

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> Everyone in town knows the name Elsie Eiler, and it’s not just because she’s the mayor—she’s the sole resident. The population had been diminishing since the 1930s, when this northern Nebraskan town had 150 residents, and by 2000, it was down to one couple: Elsie and her husband, Rudy, who has since passed away. Now in her mid-70s, Eiler serves beer at the Monowi Tavern (with an official liquor license) and turned her late husband’s collection of 5,000 books into a one-room public library.<br><br> <em>Photo &copy; Tom McLaughlin</em><br>

  • Elista, Russia

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> The king is threatened daily in this Russian town because here, it’s all about chess. Play a game on the enormous chessboard painted on the ground in the Town Square or head to Chess City, a domed complex that hosted the 1998 Chess Olympiad. Indeed, some of the world’s finest chess players have paid a visit to Elista, which is the capital of the Republic of Kalmykia. Its other strange claim to fame is being the only Buddhist region in Europe; Elista’s chess complex includes a museum of Buddhist art.<br><br> <em>Photo &copy; Ray Nayler</em><br>

  • Gibsonton, FL

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> For decades Gibsonton (a.k.a. Showtown) was the spot where carnival and circus folks spent the winter and where many chose to retire. The statue of a giant boot pays tribute to a past resident, Al Tomaini, a circus giant with size 27 shoes. For stories of more colorful local characters, stop by Showtown Bar and Grill. Still catering to the circus community, the town allows folks to leave circus trailers and elephants on the lawn. Just a short drive from Tampa, Gibsonton is also home to the International Independent Showmen’s Association, which runs the Museum of the American Carnival.<br><br> <em>Photo &copy; Bob Snead</em><br>

  • Thames Town, China

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> The Chinese reputation for knockoffs and enthusiasm for European products has spawned this full-on replica of an English town in a suburb of Shanghai, complete with cobblestoned streets and red phone booths. You can have a pint at the pub and a snack at the local chip shop and—rather less authentically—pose by statues of James Bond and Harry Potter. The faux-English backdrop is popular with couples taking wedding photos. <br><br> <em>Photo &copy; Marc van der Chijs</em><br>

  • Lily Dale, NY

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> If watching <em>Long Island Medium</em> is your guilty pleasure, you must visit Lily Dale, a town of noted psychics in upstate New York. The town hosts lectures and was also the focus of a HBO documentary. Make an appointment with one of the many mediums in the town or attend a service at the Healing Temple. Either way, you will find yourself connecting with spiritual forces in this unique village of enlightened folks. Many find themselves drawn to meditate at the town’s Forest Temple. (Note that Lily Dale is a gated community; registered medium services are available year round, but most events are held exclusively in summer, when there is a gate fee of $5­–10 per person; <a href="http://lilydaleassembly.com" target="_hplink">lilydaleassembly.com</a>.)<br><br> <em>Photo &copy; Frank Kasperek</em><br>

  • Slab City, CA

    <a href="http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/worlds-strangest-towns/9" title="World's Strangest Towns" target="_hplink">See More of the World's Strangest Towns</a><br><br> There are no laws in this California town on the site of an old World War II Marine barracks in the desert near the Salton Sea. You know you’ve arrived when you see Salvation Mountain, a large installation by artist Leonard Knight. While there’s no running water, the town does have an open-air nightclub called the Range, run by a resident and with performances by local musicians on Saturday nights. The town attracts a mixed crowd of snowbird RV owners and folks really trying to live off the grid.<br><br> <em>Photo &copy;<a href="http://www.mediajewell.com/" target="_hplink"> Jessica Jewell</a></em><br>