Huffpost TV

Lots Of Fox News Viewers Watch (GASP!) MSNBC Too

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MSNBC hosts Rachel Maddow, left, Lawrence O'Donnell, center, and Chris Matthews take part in a panel discussion at the NBC Universal summer press tour, Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, in Beverly Hills, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello) | AP

Cable news is the real king of television--and a lot of people watch more than one network, according to a new Pew Study.

TV remains the dominant way that people get their news, the study, which was reported Friday, said. Though broadcast networks get more viewers, it's cable that attracts the most passionate audiences:

On average, the cable news audience devotes twice as much time to that news source as local and network news viewers spend on those platforms. And the heaviest cable users are far more immersed in that coverage--watching for more than an hour a day--than the most loyal viewers of broadcast television news. Even those adults who are the heaviest viewers of local and network news spend more time watching cable than those broadcast outlets.

What's more, a sizable chunk of viewers switch between supposedly antagonistic networks:

In one finding that may seem counterintuitive in an era of profound political polarization, significant portions of the Fox News and MSNBC audiences spend time watching both channels. More than a third (34%) of those who watch the liberal MSNBC in their homes also tune in to the conservative Fox News Channel. The reverse is true for roughly a quarter (28%) of Fox News viewers. Even larger proportions of Fox News and MSNBC viewers, roughly half, also spend time watching CNN, which tends to be more ideologically balanced in prime time.

Read the full report here.

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