Huffpost New York

Bloomberg's Education Plan For New York City Schools Is Working

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BLOOMBERG EDUCATION
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, talks about standardized test scores during a news conference, in New York, Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013. Less than a third of New York students in grades three through eight scored well enough on statewide tests to be considered proficient in math and English last spring. New York is only the second state to test students based on the more rigorous Common Core learning standards adopted by most states as a way to improve student readiness for college. | AP

Bill de Blasio, the likely next New York City mayor, has made a lot of promises about public education. No additional charter schools; no free space for many charter schools educating city kids; less reliance on student test performance to judge schools; and a moratorium on the closure of low-performing schools. Though these pledges have come piecemeal, together they would dismantle the reforms Michael Bloomberg implemented during his 12 years as mayor. Before this happens, it’s worth looking at what Bloomberg’s policies have accomplished and what is at risk if they are tossed out.

This essay will show what has been accomplished—how children have benefited from Bloomberg’s education policies and how the system has changed in positive ways. Then in later sections it discusses, first, how the positive results came about; and second, how the next can mayor make sure those gains are not lost.

Read the whole story at The Atlantic