WASHINGTON -- There are now three Republicans who publicly support a comprehensive immigration reform bill introduced by Democrats, after Rep. David Valadao (R-Calif.) announced Wednesday he has signed on to the bill.

He follows Reps. Jeff Denham (R-Calif.) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), both of whom also announced their support this week for the bill, HR 15. There are currently 190 co-sponsors, short of the 218 needed to get a majority of the House.

"By supporting H.R. 15 I am strengthening my message: Addressing immigration reform in the House cannot wait," Valadao said in a statement. "I am serious about making real progress and will remain committed to doing whatever it takes to repair our broken immigration system."

A majority of House Democrats are co-sponsoring the legislation, and supporters argue that more Republicans should sign on to pressure leadership to bring it for a vote. So far, GOP leaders have declined to allow a vote on the comprehensive immigration reform bill that passed the Senate in June, and have indicated that HR 15 won't get a vote either, unless a majority of Republicans support it.

The bill is the only comprehensive immigration legislation currently in the House, where leaders say they plan to consider separate bills but have yet to schedule votes. The Democrat-led legislation is based on the Senate-passed bill and a border security measure approved earlier this year by the House Homeland Security Committee, both of which passed with bipartisan support. It includes a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants, along with changes to border security, enforcement and the legal immigration system.

Valadao has indicated support for a pathway to citizenship in the past, and comes from a district with a large Latino population. Still, adding Republicans strengthens the Democrats' message that immigration reform is a bipartisan priority.

Rep. Joe Garcia (D-Fla.), the bill's chief sponsor, applauded Valadao's decision to sign on to the bill.

"I appreciate Congressman Valadao’s willingness to work with both sides of the aisle on comprehensive immigration reform," Garcia said in a statement. "With his support and help, I look forward to strengthening our nation’s immigration system."

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  • Reform Would Help Curb The Deficit

    Immigration reform would <a href="http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-04-08/business/38371503_1_previous-immigration-bills-immigration-reform-immigration-laws" target="_blank">reduce the federal deficit by $2.5 trillion</a> over the next 10 years, according to an April analysis by the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank.

  • Expelling Immigrants Is Expensive

    Expelling the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants currently in the United States would cost $2.6 trillion over the next 10 years, <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/100449802" target="_blank">according to CNBC</a>. That's because it costs the government more than $8,000 to deport each person.

  • Reform Would Help Fix The Social Security Problem

    Immigration reform would help bolster Social Security because more legal workers would mean more people contributing payroll taxes to its trust fund, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-wires/20130508/us-immigration/?utm_hp_ref=arts&ir=arts" target="_blank">according to an analysis from the Social Security administration</a>. Undocumented workers <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/18/immigration-reform-social-security_n_3103500.html" target="_blank">already contribute $15 billion per year</a> to Social Security.

  • Immigrants Start Successful Businesses

    More than <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/31/worried-about-the-economy-then-pass-immigration-reform/" target="_blank">a quarter of technology and engineering firms</a> started between 1995 and 2005 had a foreign-born owner, according to the Washington Post. One <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/22/american-companies-founded-by-immigrants_n_3116172.html#slide=2357880" target="_blank">of the founders of Yahoo!</a>, Jerry Yang, is an immigrant from Taiwan.

  • Reform Would Save $410 Billion Over The Next 10 Years

    The immigration reform bill proposed by the "gang of eight" senators would save <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/15/immigration-reform-save-billions_n_3280145.html?utm_hp_ref=business" target="_blank"> $410 billion over the next decade</a>, according to an analysis from Gordon Gray, the director of fiscal policy at the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank. The savings would come largely from a boost in GDP resulting from undocumented immigrants gaining citizenship and in turn likely making more money.

  • High-Tech Companies Say Reform Would Boost Their Bottom Line

    Companies like Microsoft and Google have said that immigration reform would help them by <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2013/01/29/facebook-microsoft-back-senate.html" target="_blank">allowing for more H1B visas</a>, a special kind of visa geared toward highly-skilled immigrants. The tech giants say they can't find enough qualified people in the U.S. to fill their staffing needs.

  • Reform Would Boost The Wages Of Native-Born Workers

    U.S.-born workers see between a 0.1 and 0.6 percent boost in wages on average with an increase in immigration, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/30/immigration-reform-workers_n_2583576.html" target="_blank">according to a January report from the Hamilton Project</a>, an economic policy initiative of the nonpartisan Brookings Institution. That's because immigrant workers bring skills with them that complement those of native-born workers, leading to new jobs.

  • Immigrants Are Entrepreneurial

    Immigrants are <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/13/economic-case-commonsense-immigration-reform" target="_blank">more than twice as likely</a> than native-born Americans to start new businesses, according to a White House report on immigration reform.

  • Reform Would Boost GDP By More Than $1 Trillion Over 10 Years

    Immigration reform <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/id/100449802" target="_blank">would boost GDP by $1.5 trillion</a> -- or about 1 percent -- over 10 years, according to an estimate from UCLA professor Raul Hinojosa-Ojeda cited by CNBC.

  • Immigrants Create Jobs

    Businesses owned by immigrants <a href="http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/13/economic-case-commonsense-immigration-reform" target="_blank">created 4.7 million jobs</a> in the U.S. in 2007, according to a White House report on immigration reform.

  • Reform Would Bring In More Money Than It Costs In Benefits

    Though many critics of immigration reform argue against the cost of providing increased public benefits, analysts say higher spending is not a likely consequence. A Congressional Budget Analysis of George W. Bush's 2007 immigration reform proposal found that it would cost the government $23 billion in more public services, but bring in $48 billion in revenue, <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/31/worried-about-the-economy-then-pass-immigration-reform/" target="_blank">according to the Washington Post</a>.