POLITICS
10/30/2013 02:09 pm ET Updated Nov 11, 2013

The Fact That Democratic Women Senators Like Hillary Clinton Was A Super-Duper Secret, Apparently

Apparently, the women who serve in Congress as senators from the Democratic Party are quite fond of another woman who once served as a Democratic senator -- one who might run for president in 2016. And so these women of the Senate sent their former colleague a letter, urging her to run. But the letter was supposed to be a secret! Because ... why? I have no idea. But now the cat's out of the bag!

Here's ABC News' Rick Klein:

All of the female Democratic senators signed a secret letter to Hillary Rodham Clinton early this year encouraging her to run for president in 2016 -- a letter that includes the signature of Sen. Elizabeth Warren and other senators who are mentioned as potential candidates, two high-ranking Democratic Senate aides told ABC News.

The letter, organized at the urging of Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., was meant to be a private show of support from a group of 16 high-profile former colleagues and fans who are now senators, urging Clinton to do what much of the Democratic Party assumes she will, the aides said.

Okay, so, the newsy bit here is apparently the fact that if every female senator signs a letter urging Hillary Clinton to run, it means that a couple of people who at various times over the past year have figured into 2016 prognosticating (why are we doing that in 2013, again?) maybe shouldn't figure as prominently in 2016 prognostications.

As near as I can tell, that description only applies to Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), as she is the only person who has done things that suggest she wants to run for president. These things include:

1. Going to Iowa.

2. Saying that it's "always nice when people talk about" her running for president.

The full quote, by the way, is: “I love being a senator from Minnesota. It’s always nice when people talk about it, but right now I’m focused on this job and I think a lot of the work I’m doing in the Senate has national implications."

So that's that. Now, other political reporters have talked about Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Sen. Kirstin Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) running for president, but that's only because it is a long, long road from here to 2016 and everyone needs to have something to talk about. The only reason people put Warren in the 2016 mix is because she is shiny and new and popular and she just won an election.

Klein here says that Warren, "has been widely mentioned as a possible liberal alternative to Clinton in Democratic primaries," but that means essentially nothing. Other reporters and pundits have said that, and they are the source for this "widely mentioning." "Political people get up to all sorts of idle talk at cocktail parties," is the news here.

And Gillibrand? Well, she said this: "I am personally urging Secretary Clinton to run ... I've told her I plan to support her in any way I can.”

Anyway, no one was supposed to know about this letter containing the most unsurprising information in the universe, until Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.) accidentally copped to its existence "at an event in New York City on Monday." And now everybody knows that these women really like Hillary Clinton and there's no taking it back!

Since then, Kagan has had to send "a round of apologetic e-mails from her Senate office to other offices on Capitol Hill," because this whole "Democratic women being fond of Hillary Clinton and wanting her to maybe run for president" thing is so scandalous! I can see the passage from "GAME CHANGE 3: THE GAMECHANGENING" now -- "Everything was going great for Hillary Clinton until Kay Hagan let slip the fact that Clinton was well-liked by her colleagues."

"The actual letter has still not emerged publicly," Klein writes. "But its existence adds momentum to the growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016."

If the letter's existence was still unknown, there would still be a "growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016." If the letter's existence was announced publicly as soon as it was signed, there would still be a "growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016." If there was no letter, or if the female Democratic senators didn't know how to write a letter, or if they tried to write a letter but couldn't print it because they were out of toner or something, there would still be a "growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016." There will continue to be a "growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016," until Clinton says she's not running, and even then there will still be a "growing sense of inevitability around a Clinton candidacy in 2016."

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