MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The man who steered Indonesia to recovery after the 2004 tsunami has some cautionary words for the Philippines as it begins planning reconstruction after Typhoon Haiyan: Survivors will get angry about living in tents well before permanent houses are ready, and inflation will soon make those houses much more expensive to build.

His advice? Start working now and get survivors involved in the process.

"Please prepare warehouses now all over the region and fill them with construction materials," said Kuntoro Mangkusubroto, who headed a specially created, powerful government agency tasked with coordinating more than $7 billion in aid that flowed to the country after the disaster. "Fix the prices now."

The Indian Ocean tsunami killed about 230,000 people in a dozen countries. Indonesia's Aceh province was the worst-hit area, accounting for about half the deaths. Much of the provincial capital, Banda Aceh, was leveled.

Aceh's reconstruction didn't always run smoothly, especially during the first year, but it is now almost universally regarded as successful. Around 130,000 houses were built in less than three years, along with scores of airports, roads and schools. It was the biggest construction project in the developing world.

These days, the only sign that Banda Aceh was the epicenter of an appalling disaster are two ships carried miles inland by the giant waves. They are now popular and well-managed attractions on a "tsunami tourism" trail in the city.

There are lessons to draw from the 2004 tsunami, and from more recent — and more criticized — reconstruction efforts after disasters in Japan and Haiti. The Philippines also has much experience of its own recovering from typhoons and other disasters.

A full assessment of the damage caused by the typhoon has yet to be carried out. There were far more deaths in Aceh. The Philippines government said Wednesday that the typhoon killed more than 4,000 people and left 1,600 missing. But experts say the scale of the reconstruction needed in the Philippines looks broadly comparable with that in Aceh.

Like Indonesia in 2004, the Philippines has functioning national and local governments with committed, educated employees. Foreign countries are more likely to help if they can see efforts being made to spend money well.

Just under two weeks since the typhoon, saving lives and providing emergency aid are still the main focus. Corpses are still being collected from beneath the debris. But in a week or two, authorities will start transitioning into an "early recovery phase" and planning how best to rebuild the estimated 320,000 destroyed houses.

"It's never too early to start talking about it," said Nancy Lindborg, the assistant administrator of the U.S. government's aid arm. "What's very important is to move as quickly as possible, so you enable people to start thinking about the future."

Philippine Interior Minster Mar Roxas said authorities were already considering whether to put people in tents or bunkhouses. In Aceh, authorities built 24 wooden barrack-style complexes for survivors, but they were not popular, often located far from the original villages of the residents or their workplaces.

Aceh managed to build just 16,000 permanent houses in the first year after the tsunami. Spiking construction costs were one problem: Inflation hit 41 percent at one point as massive amounts of money chased limited supplies. Another complicating factor likely to be seen in the Philippines was that land titles and government records were destroyed.

"It was almost impossible," said Mangkusubroto via telephone from Jakarta. "People shouldn't have to live in tents for more than six months. It causes social tension."

It will likely take months to even decide where to build, or what safety standards to use, because the government and affected communities will need to work together to come up with the right answers. In Aceh, authorities initially banned construction close to the sea, but this was shelved as impractical because the province relies on fishing.

"We have to make sure that these buildings are not built in unsafe areas," said Nathaniel Von Einsiedel, the chairman of an urban development consultancy firm. "We don't want to commit the same mistake that may have contributed to the severity of the destruction in the first place."

The Philippine government said about $320 million in foreign aid has been pledged to the relief effort.

That's far less than the $7 billion Indonesia received after the tsunami — the most generous response ever to a natural disaster — but that massive amount of money created its own complications.

Some of the more than 180 aid agencies that flocked to Aceh took on projects they were not qualified for or duplicated other schemes. Some families got a house they didn't need, or in a place where didn't want to move to. Others got more than one. Today, empty, rotting houses aren't hard to find.

Another lesson from Aceh: Giving cash to disaster survivors, either in a grant or in exchange for projects such as cleaning debris, is effective and popular. Expect to see those schemes used widely in the Philippines. Old-school development thinking shied away from handing out money, partly out of fears it would be "squandered." Studies by aid agencies and academics have shown that is not the case.

Success in Aceh contrasted with stuttered reconstruction efforts in Japan following the 2011 earthquake and disaster, where more than half of the 470,000 people who either lost their homes or were evacuated from close to the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant have yet to be permanently resettled. Ample funds have gone unspent due to legal and bureaucratic obstacles to rebuilding and shortages of construction workers.

The aftermath of the Haiti earthquake in 2010 has also been troubled. The capital is awash in new construction, but the International Organization for Migration says nearly 200,000 people are still living in makeshift settlements. The international community pledged $5.4 billion to help Haiti, but only about half has been delivered to date.

The Philippines is poor, but its governance structures are stronger than those in Haiti. Aid groups will have less money to spend than after the 2004 tsunami, but coupled with Philippine government funds and loans from agencies like the World Bank, many experts and aid workers are optimistic that the region will recover.

"I think it would be disappointing if we come back in four years' time and people are worse off than what they were coming into this," said Michael Delaney, who leads Oxfam America's humanitarian response to emergencies.

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AP writers Fakhrurradzie Gade in Banda Aceh, Teresa Cerojano in Tacloban and Elaine Kurtenbach in Tokyo contributed to this report.

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  • Stuffed toys are placed on a clothes line for drying along a road in Quinapundan town, Eastern Samar province, central Philippines on November 19, 2013. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A boy plays amongst the rubble in Tolosa District on November 19, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

  • A man throws debris onto a fire as he cleans up his home in Tanauan on November 19, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

  • Market stall holders trade goods in Tacloban on November 19, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

  • Two broken palm trees stand snapped in half on the beach near Tananau on November 19, 2013 in Leyte, Philippines. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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    A man sits among uprooted oconut trees and houses destroyed during the typhoon in a small settlement on the outskirts of Tacloban on November 19, 2013. (ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A crewman watches out the back hatch of a US Marines Osprey aircraft as it returns to Tacloban Airport on November 19, 2013. (MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mary Joy Ducusin holds his picture after finding her missing six year old son, British citizen Jairo Ben among the bodies brought to one of three mass burial sites where they so far have received more than one thousand typhoon victims in Tacloban on November 19, 2013. (ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Two boys on a bicycle covers their nose and mouths as they pass body bags with 170 dead collected from the rubble at the 'Cemetery of the hills', one of three mass burial sites where they so far have received one thousand typhoon victims in Tacloban on November 19, 2013. (ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Children walk at the site of a bunker fuel spill in an area devastated by Super Typhoon Haiyan on the coast of Estancia in the province of Iloilo on November 18, 2013. (JAY DIRECTO/AFP/Getty Images)

  • An aerial view of the devastated district of Palo in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban, Philippines. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

  • An elderly man stands near fires used for light and to burn refuse in an area destroyed in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban, Philippines. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

  • Residents grab for aid dropped by helicopter in an area destroyed in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban, Philippines. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

  • Residents play basketball with a makeshift net in an area destroyed in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan on November 18, 2013 in Tacloban, Philippines. (Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)

  • The ECHO team first on the ground in rural Leyte province.

  • Devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.

  • A house destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan, which ripped through the Philippines Nov 8, 2013.

  • Aftermath of the destruction caused by Typhoon Haiyan.

  • Debris washed up clogs the coastline near the pier in the town of Guiuan in Eastern Samar province, central Philippines on November 11, 2013, four days after Typhoon Haiyan hit the country. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents take a bath and wash their belongings next to debris along a road in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A resident covering his face with a mask rides past dead bodies littered along a road in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A resident cries as she related her ordeal at the height of Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban City, Leyte province, central Philippines on November 10, 2013, three days after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents walk through debris and victim's bodies in Tacloban City, Leyte province, central Philippines on November 10, 2013, three days after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on November 8.(TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Children cycles past a dead body on a street at Tacloban, eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Bodies wrapped in blankets are placed inside a damaged chapel Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, a day after powerful Typhoon Haiyan slammed Tacloban city, in Leyte province, central Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • Residents walk by debris after powerful Typhoon Haiyan slammed into Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

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    Tacloban Airport is covered by debris after powerful Typhoon Haiyan hit Tacloban city, in Leyte province in central Philippines, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • Residents look at bodies brought inside a damaged chapel Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013, a day after powerful Typhoon Haiyan slammed Tacloban city, in Leyte province in central Philippines. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • Residents watch as others throw looted goods from a warehouse in the town of Guiuan, Eastern Samar province in the central Philippines on November 11, 2013, only days after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the town on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents watch as others throw looted goods from a warehouse in the town of Guiuan, Eastern Samar province in the central Philippines on November 11, 2013, only days after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the town on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents carry water-damaged sacks of rice from a rice warehouse in Tacloban in the eastern Philippine island of Leyte on November 11, 2013. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A military helicopter delivering relief food prepares to land at the airport next to broken coconut trees in the town of Guiuan in Eastern Samar province in the central Philippines on November 11, 2013 only days after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the town on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A young survivor rests on a pedicab surrounded by debris caused by Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban in the eastern Philippine island of Leyte on November 11, 2013. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • People walk amongst debris next to a ship washed ashore in the aftermath of Super Typhoon Haiyan at Anibong in Tacloban, eastern island of Leyte on November 11, 2013. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A resident who survived Typhoon Haiyan cries inside a stadium used as an evacuation centre in Tacloban, Leyte province, central Philippines on November 10, 2013, three days after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents push an improvised trolley loaded with an injured relative as they head for a medical station in Tacloban City, Leyte province,central Philippines on November 10, 2013, three days after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on November 8. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Residents carry a mattres taken from a hotel in Palo, eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013, three days after devastating Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the area on November 8. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Children peek out from their makeshift shelter in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013. (NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Typhoon Haiyan survivor burns debris in front of the ruins of his home in the village of Marabut, Samar Island, Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • A Typhoon Haiyan survivor carries a child wrapped in a towel as he watches a helicopter landing to bring aid to the destroyed town of Guiuan, Samar Island, Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)

  • A Filipino woman embraces her good luck dwarf statue salvaged from her destroyed home in an area devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • As the sun sets, it lights the sky over the area devastated by Typhoon Haiyan, in Tacloban, central Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • U.S. military personnel carry relief supplies to a waiting U.S. Navy Seahawk helicopter from the USS George Washington at the airport landing zone in Tacloban, central Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • Despite living in the massive typhoon aftermath, young girls get to play in a dog house in Tacloban, central Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • A Filipino pedicab driver pedals past damaged homes at typhoon hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

  • American military personnel load relief aid on to a US Navy Seahawk helicopter from the USS George Washington carrier at a landing zone a the airport in Tacloban, central Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Wally Santana)

  • A box of noodles donated by Filipino workers is packed to ship to the survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines at an express company in a Hong Kong shopping mall Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

  • Typhoon survivors charge their mobile phones, flash lights at a street in Tacloban, central Philippines, Friday Nov. 15. 2013. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

  • Typhoon survivors who have been waiting to be evacuated for days at the airport in Tacloban, reach out for biscuits distributed by Philippines soldiers, in Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines, Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

  • A Filipino trooper distributes water to survivors waiting for a military flight to Manila as they flee typhoon hit Tacloban city, Leyte province, central Philippines on Friday, Nov. 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)