TOKYO (AP) — A government panel is proposing additional measures to lessen the contaminated water crisis at Japan's crippled nuclear power plant.

The panel said Tuesday the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant could run out of water storage within two years if current plans are not fully workable. A draft report proposed covering the ground with asphalt to reduce rain inflow, building giant tanks and other steps. A final report is expected later this month.

The proposal is part of the government effort to step up leadership and funding of the plant's cleanup, after criticism that the repeated problems are getting out of the plant operator's capacity. Experts say contaminated water is hampering decommissioning of the plant, where three reactors melted after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

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  • In this Monday, Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Fumio Suzuki stands on his boat Ebisu Maru before the start of fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Monday, Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Choji Suzuki stands on the Ebisu Maru before the start of fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Monday, Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Fumio Suzuki cleans the deck of his boat Ebisu Maru before the start of fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fishermen Choji Suzuki, left, and his son Fumio sort out fish they caught aboard their boat Ebisu Maru in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Fumio Suzuki watches the sunrise aboard his boat Ebisu Maru before the star of fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Fumio Suzuki sorts out fish he caught aboard his boat Ebisu Maru in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • In this Aug. 26, 2013 photo, fisherman Choji Suzuki navigates the Ebisu Maru before fishing in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Japan. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)

  • Fisherman Choji Suzuki sorts out fish he caught aboard his boat Ebisu Maru in the waters off Iwaki, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, Monday, Aug. 26, 2013. (AP Photo/Koji Ueda)