MOSCOW (AP) — Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev hinted Friday that members of the punk band Pussy Riot, former tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky and others widely referred to as political prisoners will not be freed in Russia's upcoming amnesty.

The bill granting long-awaited amnesty for thousands of Russian prisoners is expected to be sent to parliament in the coming days. But the lawmakers and President Vladimir Putin have yet to fine-tune its details, determining who will be covered by the biggest amnesty in 20 years.

Rights organizations describe Pussy Riot, Khodorkovsky and dozens of people charged with violent rioting at last year's opposition protest in Moscow's Bolotnaya Square as political prisoners.

Khodorkovsky, once Russia's richest man, has already spent 10 years in prison on charges of tax evasion and embezzlement. Two of the three members of Pussy Riot convicted of hooliganism for an impromptu protest in Russia's main cathedral are now serving two-year prison terms.

Medvedev said in a television interview Friday that the government should take into account public opinion when deciding who will be covered by the amnesty.

"Our people are not inclined to provide amnesty to those who committed violent crimes, those who committed crimes against society, including hooliganism," Medvedev said. "People are not inclined to grant amnesty to people who committed state crimes, major embezzlement."

Russian rights advocates have urged the Kremlin to free political prisoners, but Medvedev denied that Russia has any. He said those often called political prisoners are "lucky enough to get in the limelight," but insisted that "they are not serving time for their political views." ''They are in prison or in jail because they violated public order," he declared.

A senior prosecutor told the Interfax news agency in an interview published Friday that Khodorkovsky may face a third trial. Alexander Zvyagintsev, deputy prosecutor general, said there are "several criminal cases" being investigated which "have good chances for court proceedings."

Those also not expected to receive amnesty include 12 people now on trial on charges of rioting and assaulting police officers during an anti-government protest in Moscow last year. They have been in jail for a year now and face eight years in prison, even though the evidence against them is scarce. One man is accused of throwing a lemon at a policeman.

At least a dozen more people face similar charges as part of a separate inquiry.

Late Friday afternoon, protesters gathered outside the State Duma, the lower house of Russia's parliament, to urge legislators to grant amnesty to the Bolotnaya Square defendants. Several of the demonstrators were detained, Russian news agencies reported.

In 1994, the State Duma granted amnesty to dozens of then-President Boris Yeltsin's opponents who had been jailed after the 1993 political standoff that ended in a military takeover of parliament.

Related on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, a member of the feminist punk band, Pussy Riot, listens from behind bars at a district court in Saransk on Friday, July 26, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • Jailed feminist punk band Pussy Riot member Maria Alekhina appears on a TV screen during a live session with the court during a hearing of her appeal in a courtroom in Perm, 1200 kms (750 miles) east of Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Alexander Agafonov)

  • A Russian punk band Pussy Riot member, who gave only her stage name of Grelka, wearing a blue balaclava, speaks to the media in Moscow, Tuesday, July 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

  • An Amnesty International member holds a hand knitted Pussy Riot fan scarf to support the members of the Russian punk band, in Brussels on Sunday Feb. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 file photo, feminist punk group Pussy Riot member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova sits in a glass enclosure at a court in Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze, File)

  • Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, a member of the feminist punk band, Pussy Riot, listens from behind bars at a district court in Saransk on Friday, July 26, 2013. (AP Photo)

  • Member of the Pussy Riot punk band Yekaterina Samutsevich, in front of the Christ the Savior Cathedral, a year after their performance, in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 21, 2013. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)

  • In this Friday, April 26, 2013 file photo, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, a member of the feminist punk band Pussy Riot, listens from behind bars at a district court in Zubova Polyana, 440 kilometers (273 miles) southeast of Moscow, in Russia's province of Mordovia. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel, file)

  • Headlights (L) and Puck (R) from 'Pussy Riot' speak at 'Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer' at Landmark's Sunshine Cinema on June 5, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images)

  • Amnesty International members hold their hand knitted Pussy Riot fan scarfs to support the members of the Russian punk band, in Brussels on Sunday Feb. 17, 2013. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

  • In this Feb. 21, 2012 file photo, members of the Russian radical feminist group Pussy Riot try to perform at the Christ the Saviour Cathedral in Moscow. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev, File)

  • Member of the Pussy Riot punk band Yekaterina Samutsevich smiles as she attends a session at the Moscow City Court where she is appealing to overturn a court's decision to ban the video of the band's "punk prayer" in Moscow's main cathedral as "extremist", Russia, Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013 file photo, jailed feminist punk band Pussy Riot member Maria Alekhina in a court room in the town of Berezniki, some 1500 km (940 miles) north-east of Moscow, Russia. (AP Photo/Alexander Agafonov, File)

  • Jailed feminist punk band Pussy Riot member Maria Alekhina is seen in a cell at a court room in the town of Berezniki, some 1500 km (940 miles) north-east of Moscow, Russia, on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Alexander Agafonov)

  • Jailed feminist punk band Pussy Riot member Maria Alekhina, center, is escorted to a court room in the town of Berezniki, some 1500 km (940 miles) north-east of Moscow, Russia, on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Alexander Agafonov)

  • Headlights from 'Pussy Riot' speaks at the Q & A of 'Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer' at Landmark's Sunshine Cinema on June 5, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images)